Catalog 2016-2017

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The College reserves the right to make changes in the program requirements as well as procedures described in this catalog.

Table of Contents
General Information

The College

Getting Started at DCC

Student Services

Academic Policies

Academic Policies (cont.)

Academic Programs

Curriculum Transfer Plans

Course Listing/Descriptions

Academic Calendar

Personnel

General Information

A Message from President Mickelsen

Thank you for choosing Dawson Community College (DCC) and over the next few years please take time to discover all that we have to offer. For over 75 years, we have promoted student success through access to quality programming and a commitment to affordability for our learners. We have many career and pre-professional programs along with the first two years of a degree that will allow you to transfer to the four-year institution of your choice. When you receive your education with us, you will be prepared to succeed anywhere – Learn today…Lead tomorrow.

We prepare students to be leaders of tomorrow who will enrich themselves, their communities, their families and their future employers. Our college is small and friendly and welcomes our students as they begin their educational journey. DCC is located in Glendive, MT – a small supportive community. We treat students, faculty, staff, and other members of our college with caring regard.

Students express their satisfaction with their education at DCC. Of the students completing the 2016 graduate survey, they reported:

  • Ninety-eight percent (98%) of DCC graduates are satisfied with the educational training.
  • Twenty-seven percent (27%) of DCC graduates are going to work after graduation while 73% are transferring to another institutions.
  • Ninety-eight percent (98%) of DCC graduates are satisfied to very satisfied with advising at DCC.
  • Ninety-six percent (96%) of graduates are satisfied to very satisfied with DCC’s core curriculum.
  • Ninety-three percent (93%) of DCC students receive financial aid. Forty-one percent (41%) receive pell grants, while 60% receive other scholarships and grants – DCC is affordable!

At Dawson Community College we have highly qualified and caring faculty along with wonderful and dedicated staff. These people are here to serve and assist you on your educational journey. You will find the support services you need to succeed.

You’ll fin excellent opportunities with us. You’ll have leadership development choices along with extracurricular activities which allow you to participate in everything from clubs and sports to student government.

At DCC, a brighter future is just ahead. Join us on your road to success.

Sincerely,

Scott R. Mickelsen, Ph.D.,
President

Mission 

Dawson Community College provides affordable and open access to quality teaching and learning.
Core Themes

  • College Transfer Education: Provide programs and services that prepare learners for transition to and success in further degree programs.
  • Career and Technical Education: Provide programs and services that prepare learners for vocational and technical career entry, transition, and advancement.
  • College Readiness Education: Provide pre-college programs and services that prepare learners for successful transition to college.
  • Continuing Education and Community Services: Provide programs and services that help address the professional, social, and personal enrichment needs of the region.

Philosophy
Dawson Community College is committed to quality, comprehensive programs. The College has an obligation to serve as an intellectual and cultural center for the community and its surrounding area. DCC is concerned with the development of the human potential and resources in the area; therefore, the institution strives to create sensitive and responsible citizens. This institution stresses social values and intellectual traditions.

Dawson Community College believes in equality of opportunity for all students. Consequently, opportunities for admission, employment and financial assistance are freely offered to students without regard to age, race, color, religion, gender, physical ability or national origin.

Non-Discrimination
Dawson Community College does not discriminate on the basis of creed, race, religion, gender, national origin, age, disability, veteran status, genetic information, pregnancy status, marital status, gender identity or expression, or sexual orientation with respect to access, employment, programs, or services. The College is in compliance with Executive Order 11246; Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, as amended by the Equal Employment Opportunity Act of 1972; Title IX regulation Implementing Educational Amendments of 1972; Section 504, Rehabilitation Act of 1973; the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990; the 1991 Civil Rights Act; the Age Discrimination in Employment Act of 1967, as amended; the Vietnam Era Veterans’ Readjustment Assistance Act of 1974; Title 49, the Montana Human Rights Act; and all other federal, state, and college rules, laws, regulations, and policies. Inquiries or complaints concerning these matters should be brought to the attention of John Bole, Director of Academic Support Services, Title IX Coordinator. Telephone: 406.377.9416. Email: [email protected] Office: 131A. Mailing Address: John Bole, Title IX Coordinator, Dawson Community College, Box 421, Glendive, MT 59330.

Accreditation
Dawson Community College is accredited by the Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities (NWCCU), an institutional accrediting body recognized by the Council for Higher Education Accreditation and/or the Secretary of the U.S. Department of Education.
Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities
8060 165th Avenue N.E., Suite 100
Redmond, WA 98052-3981

Campus Schedule

Dawson Community College’s academic year consists of two semesters, fall and spring, each approximately 15 weeks in length. A condensed summer session is also offered affording students the opportunity to complete courses within a shorter time frame. The academic calendar is accessible on the DCC website, www.dawson.edu.

The College

Location and History

Dawson Community College is located in Glendive, Montana. Within a mile of Glendive, and at the back door of DCC, one can experience Makoshika, Montana’s largest state park, a popular scenic and geological attraction for thousands of tourists each year. Fossils in the area are as plentiful as wild roses and prickly pear cactus.

The city has a fine park system and public swimming pool, one of the best football and track stadiums in the state, an excellent city library, and a local history museum. One can also enjoy hunting, fishing, golfing, hiking, tennis, mountain biking, skateboarding, and cross country skiing. The Yellowstone River, the nation’s longest untamed river, flows through the middle of Glendive, and is a source of agate hunting, fishing, and a variety of other recreational activities. Glendive’s medical center is staffed with outstanding health care professionals. Glendive has churches of numerous denominations, and an airport which offers daily connections to transportation hubs. The entire area welcomes community college students.

The climate is moderate with very low humidity. Glendive averages over 220 days of sunshine and 24 inches of snow per year.

Dawson Community College was established in 1940 as a public junior college. During the next several decades the junior college underwent several changes, including a separation from the Dawson County High School, a move to the present location, a name change, and an expansion of its mission to become a full service community college.

Dawson Community College offers a wide range of transfer programs and career-technical degrees along with one year certificates to meet the educational needs of eastern Montana. The college also offers workshops, short courses, adult education opportunities, and workforce development. Courses are available on campus and online.

campus map

Main Building
The main building (e) currently houses the administration, faculty and staff offices, classrooms, laboratories, library, Academic Support Center, computer classrooms, student center and lounge, and community room.

Ullman Center
The Ullman Center (f) is located west of the main building. It houses additional faculty offices, classrooms, agricultural lab, art room, lecture hall, and welding lab.

Toepke Center
The Toepke Center (d) is located east of the main building. It is home to Dawson Community College’s performing arts and physical education activities. It has 54,420 square feet of space and is the largest and newest building on campus. The Toepke Center includes a 2000 seat gymnasium, weight room, cardio room, 300 seat auditorium, recording studio, keyboard lab, band room, choir room, stage craft workshop, numerous practice rooms, Campus Store, Buc’s Brew, and athletic offices.

Residence Halls
Located on campus are three apartment-style student residence halls, Gibson (b), Brueberg (c) and Kettner (a), which can house a total of 160 students. A commons area, adjoining the on-campus living complex, provides a great place for students to gather and socialize.

Getting Started at DCC

Campus Visits and Buccaneer Days

Campus tours are available through the Office of Admissions. To assure the availability of staff, please contact the office at 406.377.9400 in advance to set up your campus visit. DCC Buccaneer Days give prospective students and their families a chance to meet with faculty and students, explore academic facilities, sit in on a class session, and tour the campus. You may register online at https://www.dawson.edu/future/visit/

Entrance Requirements/Procedures

Admissions
Dawson Community College maintains an “open door” policy for those who are 16 years or older. DCC does not discriminate on the basis of age, color, religion, creed, disability, marital status, veteran status, national origin, gender or sexual orientation in the education programs and activities which it operates. The college encourages students to seek admission if its programs and services will meet their educational needs. The admissions process is based on self-selection, and students may enroll at any time throughout the year. Any person with a disability, who is concerned about accessibility and/or accommodation issues, should contact the Director of Student Support Services at 406.377.9416.

Degree Seeking Student Admission
For degree students, a complete admission file includes:

  • A completed DCC Application for Admission form or if transferring from a Montana College/University there is the option of completing the MUS Request for Transmittal;
  • An application fee of $30 (non-refundable);
  • A complete high school transcript sent from the accredited high school after the student has graduated (home schooled graduates should contact the Admissions Office regarding specific requirements), a recognized high school equivalency certificate issued by a state department of public instruction (GED, HiSET, TASC);
  • Recent (within one year) high school graduates must complete either the American College Test (preferred) or the Scholastic Achievement Test. Scores must be sent to DCC by the testing company;
  • MMR immunization records.

Transfer Student Admission
DCC accepts transfer students under the degree seeking student admissions standards. An official transcript is required from each previously attended institution of higher education. Students who have been suspended from other institutions for disciplinary reasons will be admitted at the discretion of the administration.

Non-Degree Student Admission
For non-degree students, a complete admission file consists of the following (non-degree students are not eligible for financial aid):

  • A completed DCC Application for Admission Non-Degree/Enrollment Form;
  • MMR immunization records.

Dual Enrollment Admission
Dawson Community College offers courses by dual enrollment. Dual enrollment is defined as a program that permits high school students to earn college credits while still enrolled in high school. Courses may be taken for college credit only or may be offered for credit both at the high school and at the college. Students receive a tuition discount (early start tuition/fees) and services that are comparable to those of regularly enrolled college students.

High school students who are interested in dual enrollment opportunities should contact their school administrators. Participation is open to high school juniors and seniors who qualify for college classes. For more information please contact the Vice President of Academic Affairs or your local high school officials.

Early Start Admission
Area high school students, at least 16 years of age, may enroll in any course under the Early Start Program. Tuition for these courses is one half of the regular per credit hour cost for a maximum of ten (10) credits per semester; this rate does not apply to online, ED2GO; self-paced, workshops, or non-credit courses.

For Early Start Students, a complete admission file consists of the following:

  • Completed Early Start Application
  • MMR immunization records;
  • Approval from High School Principal if enrolling in a day course.

International Student Admission
In addition to the degree seeking admissions standards, nonresident alien students are required to certify their proficiency in English by having an official copy of their TOEFL scores sent to the college.

For International Students, a complete admission file includes:

  • A completed DCC Application for Admission form;
  • An application fee of $30 (non-refundable);
  • A complete high school transcript sent from the accredited high school after the student has graduated; if not in English must be accompanied by an official translation;
  • Applicants whose native language is not English are required to submit official results on the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) exam. The minimum score accepted is 500 on the paper test; 173 on the computerized test; and 61 on the internet-based test;
  • Students born after December 31, 1956, must submit a physician-validated record of TWO MMR vaccinations, diphtheria, tetanus, and skin testing for tuberculosis; if not in English must be accompanied by an official translation.
  • A completed ‘DCC Source of Support Form’ with accompanying financial documentation, which certifies that funding, is available to cover all estimated expenses for one calendar year.

Evidence of Immunization
Students who were born after December 31, 1956 and who plan to register for six (6) credits or more must, as required by Montana state law, show proof of immunization against measles and rubella on or after their first birthday and after December 31, 1967. Immunizations that were administered after June 11, 1993 must be measles/mumps/rubella (MMR). The record must be signed by a physician, health agency, or school official. The date (day/month/year) of the immunizations must be included. International Students must also show a physician validated immunization record for diphtheria, tetanus, and skin testing for tuberculosis; if not in English must be accompanied by an official translation.

The Registration Process

Registration is the official process of enrolling in classes and is accomplished by meeting with an advisor, registering for classes and paying tuition and fees. The published academic calendar has information regarding application and registration dates. Anyone who has been admitted is eligible to enroll, please refer to the pages in this section for information regarding the admissions process. Students may not enroll in more than 21 credit hours in a semester without approval from the Vice President of Academic Services office.

Students must be in good standing (academic, financial and/or other) to register for classes. Students with outstanding tuition and fees, school fines, or other holds on their account cannot register until such holds have been cleared.

Orientation
DCC provides a formal orientation to acquaint new and transfer students with the policies and organization of the college. Orientation days are scheduled prior to the beginning of each semester for this process. Placement tests, campus information sessions, library orientation, and group advising are some of the activities that take place during orientation. All new and transfer students who have not previously completed their English and mathematics core requirements must take the COMPASS placement tests. These tests are given by Academic Support Center personnel during orientation and by special arrangement. Scores on the COMPASS tests help advisors and students select appropriate course-work.

Placement Testing
Placement testing is conducted at the beginning of each term to help advisors assess any reading, mathematics, writing or other support needs that students may require. Advanced placement recommendations may also be made if the student is ready to enter higher-level coursework. All students entering DCC for the first time must complete the COMPASS placement tests provided by the Academic Support Center. Testing may be performed during advance registration or during orientation at Dawson Community College.

Advising
Students meet with an advisor during orientation to arrange a class schedule and to enroll in courses for the semester, via Banner MyInfo. Thereafter, the student and advisor work throughout the term to plan the student’s course of study for program completion and/or to meet the requirements of an institution to which the student may be planning to transfer. The student is responsible for contacting the transfer institution. For more information about admissions, please contact 406.377.9410.

Changes in Registration
Students can make changes to their class schedules after they have registered for classes. They should meet with their academic adviser to discuss the ramifications of the changes as they pertain to graduation requirements and potential transfer issues. Changes to class schedules may be completed within the time frames published in the academic calendar. Please refer to the Academic Affairs section for information regarding the College’s Drop/Add Policy.

Expenses

Residency Requirements
In-District students are those:

  • Who pay or whose parents pay taxes on real property located within the Dawson Community College District and who have resided in the district for one continuous year or more or whose parents have had permanent residence for one full year or more in the Dawson Community College District.
  • Who are real property taxpayers or whose parents are real property taxpayers in the Dawson Community College District and who have lived in the Dawson Community College District for a continuous year, and have taken all reasonable steps to establish residency, and who have not enrolled in seven or more DCC credits per term during that continuous year.

Out-of-District students are those:

  • Residents of Montana who do not qualify as “In-District” residents; those whose parents are not real property taxpayers in the Dawson Community College District.

Out-of-State students are those:

  • Who are neither residents of the state or whose parents are not Montana real property taxpayers.

Western Undergraduate Exchange
Dawson Community College participates in the Western Undergraduate Exchange (WUE), a program of the Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education and other Western states. Through WUE, students from Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Commonwealth of the Northern Marianas Islands, Hawaii, Idaho, Nevada, New Mexico, North Dakota, Oregon, South Dakota, Utah, Washington, Wyoming may enroll at Dawson Community College in any program, paying resident tuition plus 50 percent of that amount (plus other fees that are paid by all students).

Because Dawson Community College participates in this program, residents of Montana may apply for admission at institutions in participating states. Each state and institution reserves the right to set its own limitations within the WUE program. Information about WUE may be obtained from the Admissions Office.

Canadian Cultural Exchange Scholarship
DCC offers a special tuition rate for residents of the Canadian provinces Alberta, British Columbia, Manitoba, and Saskatchewan, each year for two consecutive years.

Student selection is made on a first-come, first-serve basis for those who apply to and are accepted by the college for full-time enrollment. The student must also meet all other foreign student admission requirements of DCC.

These students would be eligible for continuation of this rate for up to four consecutive terms. They must remain full-time students (12 or more credits) and maintain a minimal 2.00 grade point average (GPA) per term. All fees are the responsibility of the student.

Tuition & Fees

Payment of Tuition and Fees
All tuition and fees must be paid or adjusted at the time of registration. Registration is not completed until this is done. Payments should be directed to the Student Services Office and may be made in the form of cash, check, money order or bank credit card (MasterCard, Visa, American Express or Discover). Please contact the Student Services Office for information regarding third-party billing and deferments.

A nonrefundable late fee of $40.00 is paid by all students who are taking more than six credits and who do not pay tuition and fees during the period designated for registration, unless their late registration was the fault of Dawson Community College. The late registration fee applies to students enrolled for six credit hours or less after the second week of classes.

If a bank declines payment on a personal check and returns it to Dawson Community College, the late registration fee and non-sufficient fund fee will be charged to the student who has offered the check for the payment of fees.

Course Fees
Some courses, especially those in lab sciences, music, art, and the physical education and recreation departments, may require additional fees. Students registering for courses can refer to the course description section of the catalog for courses with additional fees. A list of those fees is available in the Vice-President’s office.

Application Fee (non-refundable) $30.00
Audit Fee On Tuition/Fee Schedule (same as taking course for credit)
CCCOnline Handling Fee (per course – non-refundable) $35.00
CCCOnline Per Credit Hour Fee $175.00
Course Challenge Handling Fee (per course – non-refundable) $30.00
Course Challenge Per Credit Hour Fee On Tuition/Fee Schedule
Early Start Per Credit Hour Fee (10 credit maximum) 1/2 of Tuition
Experiential Learning Per Credit Hour Fee On Tuition Schedule
Graduation Fee $60.00
Meal Card Replacement $20.00
Non-sufficient Funds Check Fee $30.00
Off-campus Site Per Credit Hour Fee On Tuition/Fee Schedule
Placement Test Re-testing Fee $15.00
Self Paced Handling Fee (per course – non-refundable) $30.00
Self Paced Per Credit Hour Fee (non-refundable) $136.40
Senior Citizen Gold Card Tuition Waived, Payment of Fees is Required
Student ID Card Replacement $20.00
Summer Semester Internship Per Credit Hour Fee
Maximum Number of Internship Credits Allowed per Summer Session is five (5)
On Tuition/Fee Schedule
Other fees may apply to specific courses Contact Instructional Services for courses with additional fees.

Senior Citizen Gold Card
The Senior Citizen Gold Card is intended to provide opportunities for senior citizens to participate in College activities and events. Senior citizens who are at least 60 years of age and reside in the Dawson Community College service area are eligible for the following:

  • tuition waivers for college courses (fees apply and minimum class enrollment and space available must be met before the College will honor Gold Card registrations)
  • free admittance to regular athletic functions

Gold Card registrations exclude:

  • Workshops/Courses with 194/294/191/291/192/292 rubrics
  • Enterprise and/or self-supporting activities/events
  • CCCOnline courses
  • Course fees, Lab fees, and additional material/course fees

Once an application has been submitted, a lifetime Gold Card will be issued. Senior citizens who want to be Gold Card holders are encouraged to contact the President’s Office at 406.377.9401 for an application.

Deferred Payment Plan
The following deferred payment plan for tuition and fees is available*:

  • Prior approval must be made before the day of registration.
  • A non-refundable administrative charge of $25.00 per semester will be levied.
  • One third of total amount due must be paid at the time of registration.
  • Another third of total amount due must be paid within 30 days.
  • Final third of total amount due must be paid within 60 days.

Payment must be made even though the student withdraws from school. Any refund that is owed to the student because of withdrawal (either voluntary or involuntary) will be applied toward the payment of the deferred fee obligation. Should the refund be larger than the amount that is outstanding, the excess will be returned to the student. Any unpaid balance of the deferred obligation must be paid before the student may re-enroll, graduate, or receive transcripts.

Students who do not pay in accordance with the terms of the deferred payment contract may have their enrollment canceled. Students may be denied the right to initiate another deferred payment. Deferred payment contracts must be signed at the Student Services Office. * this plan is subject to change.

Refunds – Institutional Policy/Procedure
For students withdrawing from all classes, the official withdrawal process must be completed. For withdrawals completed after the tenth (10th) class day, the student will be responsible for the full cost of tuition and fees. The withdrawal form may be obtained at the Student Services Office. Tuition and fees will be adjusted according to the following schedule.

Refunds for Fall and Spring Semesters
Through the fifth (5th) day of classes – No tuition and fees charged.
Between the sixth (6th) and tenth (10th) day of classes – 50% of tuition and fess charged.
After the tenth (10th) day of classes – Student is responsible for full cost of tuition and fees.

Refunds for Summer Term
For any summer class full refunds will be made IF withdrawal occurs at least two (2) business days before the class begins. If the withdrawal does not occur at least two (2) business days prior to the beginning of class no refund will be issued.

Refund Policy for Continuing Education, Non-credit Courses, and Workshops
A 100 percent refund will be made whenever students cancel their registration at least two (2) business days prior to the first class meeting or if the class is canceled by the College.

The following rules apply:

  • The admission fee is nonrefundable.
  • Refunds for CCCOnline courses follow the same guidelines as refunds for on-campus classes.
  • Dorm security deposit ($150) will be refunded up to 25 days before the beginning of the semester for which housing has been reserved. No refunds are given if cancellations are made after that date.
  • Students receiving Title IV financial assistance will be subject to both this policy and the “Return of Title IV Funds” that is stated below.

Return of Title IV Funds
If a student withdraws or ceases attendance on or before the 60% point in time of the payment period, which is calculated using school calendar days, a portion of the total of Title IV funds that have been awarded that student must be returned, according to the provisions of the Higher Education Amendments of 1998. The following funds are returned: Federal Direct Unsubsidized Loan, Federal Direct Subsidized Loan, Federal Perkins Loan, Federal Direct PLUS Loan, Federal Pell Grant, Federal Supplemental Education Opportunity Grant, and Federal Iraq and Afghanistan Service Grant. The calculation of the return of these funds may result in the student owing a balance to the College and/or the Federal Government. Examples are available upon request in the Financial Aid Office. A hold will be placed on the student account until this College bill is paid in full with the Student Services Office at DCC.

Financial Aid

Financial aid is available to eligible students who, without such help, would be unable to attend Dawson Community College. The primary responsibility for financing a college education rests with the student and his/her family. Dawson Community College financial aid is viewed only as a supplement to student/family support.

All aid applicants must complete and submit the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) form which may be completed on-line at www.fafsa.gov (a paper copy is available from the U.S. Department of Education by calling 1-800-433-3243). When applying for financial aid, a student should use tax information from the prior tax year and list the school code of 002529 for Dawson Community College. Students attending DCC for the first time must apply for admission as degree seeking to be considered for financial aid. Students who apply early, usually before December 1 for fall enrollment, and who complete all other documentation requirements, are given priority for limited funds. Those who complete requirements later are considered only for Federal Direct Loan programs, Federal Pell Grants, and Federal Iraq and Afghanistan Services Grants. For more information contact the DCC Office of Financial Aid.

Verification
Some students will be selected for the “Verification Process” which requires the Financial Aid Office to evaluate the accuracy of a student’s financial aid application. These students may be required to submit IRS Tax Return Transcripts and other documents to verify the information on their application. If a student is selected, he/she will be advised concerning the documentation that is required. Failure to provide requested documentation will stop further processing of the financial aid application.

Determination of Eligibility
Most student aid is awarded on the basis of need. “Need” is defined as the difference between cost of education, (tuition, fees, room, board, books, supplies, transportation and personal expenses), and the Expected Family Contribution, which is the amount the student and his/her family contribute as determined by the FAFSA.

If educational cost exceeds the family’s ability to contribute, need will exist, and every effort will be made to provide adequate financial aid. To offer maximum assistance, awards often are made in the form of a financial aid “package” combining two or more different types of aid (grants, scholarships, employment, and/or loans).

Applications are processed in the order in which they are received. The Financial Aid Office reserves the right to make the final determination regarding the type(s) and amount of aid awarded, based upon an evaluation of the applicant’s eligibility for a particular type of aid and upon the availability of funds under the various aid programs.

Financial Aid Eligibility Requirements
To receive Title IV financial aid each recipient must meet the following eligibility requirements:

  • Be enrolled/accepted for enrollment in a degree or certificate program.
  • Not be enrolled in elementary or secondary school.
  • Have a high school diploma or recognized equivalent.
  • Be a citizen of the United States or be an eligible non-citizen.
  • Maintain satisfactory academic progress.
  • Not be in default on a Title IV loan.
  • Not owe a repayment of any Title IV grant.
  • Be registered with the Selective Service Administration, if required.
  • Not have borrowed in excess of loan limits.
  • Have need, as defined by individual program requirements (except for Direct Unsubsidized and PLUS Loans).
  • Meet any other program-specific criteria.

Payment to Student
All financial aid is awarded and will be applied toward the student’s direct college costs of attendance (i.e., tuition, fees, and residence hall room and board charges). Aid is disbursed prior to the seventh (7th) classroom day of each semester to students who have:

  • accepted their aid
  • submitted all required documents and documents have been processed
  • have finalized their schedule bill via their “My Info” student account.

If there is a balance due on these direct charges after scholarships, grants, and loan assistance have been applied, the student will be responsible to pay the amount due to the College or set up the necessary deferred payment plan, should the student be eligible. All federal/state financial assistance and most scholarships will be disbursed in equal installments for each semester. Work study students are paid monthly, based on the time sheet submitted by the student and the work supervisor. Loans may be canceled under certain conditions if the student no longer desires the debt.

Grants
The Federal Pell Grant program is designed to provide undergraduate students with a foundation of financial aid. The financial need of the student is determined by a formula that has been developed by the U.S. Congress and is applied consistently to all applicants using the information reported on the FAFSA. The award is to be used for education expenses, which include tuition, fees, room and board, books and supplies. The amount of Pell Grant a student receives depends on his/her enrollment status.

Federal Supplemental Education Opportunity Grant (FSEOG) is available on a limited basis to undergraduate students with exceptional need for assistance (Pell Grant recipients must be given priority).

Federal Iraq and Afghanistan Service Grant. Students who are not eligible for a Pell Grant but whose parent or guardian was a member of the U.S. Armed Forces and died as a result of service performed in Iraq or Afghanistan after September 11, 2001 may be able to receive this grant. Student must be under 24 years of age OR enrolled in college at least part-time at the time of the parent’s or guardian’s death.

Work Study Employment
Federal and State Work Study are financial aid programs that are funded by Federal and State governments and awarded based on student financial need. These programs are awarded as a part of the total aid package to students who will be enrolled at least half-time for Federal and full-time for State. Eligible students may work up to 10 hours per week in an on-campus or off-campus job. Off-campus work study jobs are limited to community service employment.

Loans
Federal Perkins Loan provides loans to eligible students who have demonstrated financial need. The college is the lender for this low interest (5 percent) loan and the maximum a student may borrow in an academic year is $5,000. Repayment of the Perkins Loan is deferred while the borrower is enrolled at least half-time in the approved institution of higher education. Interest begins to accrue and repayment starts nine months after the borrower ceases to be enrolled at least half-time. Repayment may be extended over a maximum of 10 years; minimum monthly payments are established at $40 plus accrued interest. Under certain circumstances the loan can be canceled. Information regarding loan cancellation and deferment is available in the Financial Aid Office.

Federal Direct Loan is a low interest loan made by the United States Department of Education to students attending college at least half-time. Federal Direct Loan applicants must show financial need in order to qualify and this requires completion of a financial aid application. A maximum of $3,500 for freshman and $4,500 for sophomore year may be borrowed and must be repaid within 10 years of leaving school.

Unsubsidized Federal Direct Loan is a low interest loan that is made by the United States Department of Education to students attending school at least half-time. Students who may not be eligible for any or all of the Federal Direct Loan may apply for assistance through the Unsubsidized Federal Direct Loan. Interest will not be deferred while the student is attending college; therefore, the student must pay that interest while in college. Students must apply for financial aid and meet all other general financial aid eligibility criteria.

Additional Unsubsidized Federal Direct Loans are available for students whose full cost of attendance has not been met with other financial aid. The Ensuring Continued Access to Student Loan Act (ECASLA) of 2008 allows eligible dependent students to borrow up to $2,000 per year. Independent undergraduates and dependent undergraduates whose parents are unable to borrow PLUS are allowed to borrow up to $6,000 per year.

Federal Direct PLUS Loan is a fixed interest, unsubsidized loan made to parents of dependent students. Parents may borrow the cost of college attendance minus other financial aid. Federal Direct PLUS borrowers generally must begin repaying both principal and interest within 60 days after the loan is fully disbursed or delayed at borrower’s option. Interested parents should contact the Financial Aid Office.

All student borrowers of Perkins or Direct loans are required, by law, to participate in entrance counseling prior to receiving their first disbursement from a loan. They are also required to participate in exit counseling upon leaving the institution or dropping below half time enrollment. Information is available in the Financial Aid Office.

Other Financial Aid Programs
Scholarships: Dawson Community College makes many scholarships available to students. The duration of assistance, scholarship amounts, requirements and criteria for each scholarship varies. Any prospective or currently enrolled student may obtain applications from the Financial Aid Office or download the application.

Short Term Emergency Loans: The Dawson College Foundation provides a special fund to assist students who have unanticipated needs. Loans are for up to three months and a nominal service charge is assessed.

State Vocational Rehabilitation Service: Students with certain disabilities may qualify for educational assistance through the Montana Department of Social and Rehabilitation Service. Contact that office for more information.

Tribal Grants: These funds are available to many Native American students who are enrolled in a full-time course of study. The award limits are based on the student’s need and the availability of funds. Further information may be obtained by contacting the student’s tribal office or the tribal higher education office.

Veterans Benefits: Subsistence payments from the Veterans Administration are based on the number of credit hours for which the student is registered. A minimum of 12 credit hours is required for full payment of benefits. An “Application for Education Benefits” should be filed with the VA well before the beginning of the college semester. Certificates of Eligibility must be submitted to the Registrar’s Office.
Veterans Policy: For veterans with outstanding service, policy states that all tuition and fees will be waived for any veteran who has been awarded either the Medal of Honor of the Army or the Navy’s Distinguished Service Cross, or the U.S. Air Force’s Distinguished Flying Cross.

Waivers of Tuition: Tuition waivers are available for eligible veterans, senior citizens, faculty and staff, high school honor students, athletes, art, and music students who display great talent.

Satisfactory Academic Progress Requirements for Federal Financial Aid
Federal regulations require all students who receive financial aid to maintain satisfactory academic progress toward an eligible degree or certificate by meeting GPA and completion requirements. Students who wish to be considered for financial aid at DCC must maintain satisfactory progress in their selected course of study by meeting the following requirements:

  • 2.0 Cumulative GPA
  • 67% Cumulative Pace
  • Timely progression toward degree completion; the number of credits attempted are within 150% of the number of credits required for program completion.

Each student receiving financial assistance is directed to the DCC website at www.dawson.edu/future/ financial-aid/satisfactory-academic-progress for a detailed explanation of the satisfactory Academic Progress Standards. This information is also available in the Financial Aid Office and in the Student Handbook.

The Financial Aid Office evaluates student academic progress at the end of each semester.

The preceding does not reflect the entire policy and is intended to provide a brief overview only. Students receiving financial aid should understand the provisions of this policy; it is assumed that the student will fulfill all responsibilities in this regard.

Student Services

The division of Student Services exists to create and sustain a healthy, safe living and learning environment that: promotes learning; supports a residential community in which students are involved and have a sense of belonging; provides support for students in need; encourages students to become leaders; offers a wide range of social options; and fosters respect for the dignity and worth of all persons. In short, we seek to challenge and support our students to become responsible, engaged citizens of the campus and general Dawson County community.

Student Services staff are trained to give students support in a variety of ways to enhance their personal and professional preparation for a successful future. Information about services and programs is available in the Student Services Office 101. Any student who has questions relative to college policies/procedures should feel free to discuss the matter with staff.

Buc’s Brew Coffee Shop

Dawson Community College added a new gathering area for our students in the fall of 2016. Students are now able to purchase gourmet coffees, teas, smoothies, and protein drinks in the new Buc’s Brew Coffee Shop. Muffins, scones, and cupcakes can also be found amidst the delicious scents wafting out of the Coffee Shop. Located in the Toepke Center, students are encouraged to use the additional seating for studying, board game nights, Open Mic sessions, etc. Gift certificates and punch cards are available for purchase. 

Hours of Operation: M-F, 8A-7P.
Location: DCC Campus, Toepke Center Lobby
Contact Information: 406.377.9439; www.facebook.com/Buc’sBrewCoffeeShop

Buc’s Brew Employment Opportunities: The Buc’s Brew is staffed by one full-time manager, 2-4 work study students, and other part-time help. Please contact Buc’s Brew or DCC Human Resources department for available openings. 

Campus Store

The Dawson Community College Campus Store is an information hub which serves our campus and community by providing a friendly atmosphere with excellent customer service while offering textbooks and supplies that cater to the educational needs of the student along with quality at affordable prices. In addition, customers will find Made in Montana products, art supplies, and gifts. 

Parents and loved ones should keep in mind the Campus Store when looking for care packages for their students. The Campus Store can put together goodie bags and baskets for birthdays, finals week, or whenever your son/daughter may be needing a little pick-me-up. 

Hours of Operation: M-F, 10A-5P
Location: DCC Campus, Toepke Center, Room 102
Contact Information: 406.377.9457; www.facebook.com/Dawson.Bookstore

Campus Store Employment Opportunities: The Campus Store is staffed by one full-time manager, 2-4 work study students, and other part-time help. Please contact the Campus Store or DCC Human Resources department for available openings.

Refunds
Books will be refunded at 100% of the purchase price if the following criterion is met:

  • To receive a refund or to exchange or sell back a book, the student must have a receipt.
  • Full refunds only given during the first week of the semester.
  • New books must be in absolutely new condition, free from all marks or writing, for a full refund. If shrink-wrapped books have been opened they are no longer considered new. Digital books/pass-codes that have been opened cannot be returned.
  • A new book that is marked is considered to be a used book and will be refunded at 50% of retail value.
  • Refunds cannot be issued for workbooks or lab books that have been written in. Your name in a book automatically makes it a used book.

Food Service

Dawson Community College offers a wide variety of food options, great service, and a quality dining experience to students, employees, and visitors. The Jolly Roger Galley, located in the Student Center serves daily specials, salad bar, made-to-order sandwiches and grilled items, hot entrees, grab-and-go salads, and a wide selection of snacks and desserts. The Jolly Roger also offers a wide variety of bottled beverages, fountain pop, and fresh hot coffee. For information regarding food service options or prices call the Student Services office at 406.377.9400.

Catering Services: For information regarding catering options please contact the Jolly Roger Galley.
Hours: The Jolly Roger Galley is open Monday-Friday, 7A-7 P, when classes are in session.
Meal Plans: Dawson Community College offers two meal plans to meet the varied needs of our students. Students living in campus housing are required to purchase a meal plan.

Campus Housing

Student housing is available in two-bedroom apartments located east of the main college buildings. Each apartment provides up to six students with two carpeted bedrooms, a kitchen/dining area, living room, bathroom, and storage space.

The housing complex facilities include laundry rooms, study area, computer/printer, TV lounge, mail service, vending machines, a pool table, and a foosball table.

The housing complex is staffed with residence life staff and resident who are trained to assist in problem situations and plan social, cultural and educational programming for the residents.

Campus housing students must pay apartment rent in full at the time of registration. Campus housing students must also pay for a food plan in full at the time of registration.

Housing Residency Requirement
All students who have completed fewer than 30 total credit hours of coursework or receiving scholarship directly from DCC (i.e., tuition waivers, books), are required to live in the residence halls. Exceptions are made for students who meet one of the following circumstances:

  • Reside with their parent(s)
  • Are married
  • Are single parents
  • Registered for eleven or fewer credit hours
  • Are at least 21 years of age
  • Have a particular hardship or other extenuating circumstance that compels an exemption

Requests for housing residency exemption must be written and accompanied by supporting documentation and submitted to the Admissions Office. Students are not released from the residency requirement until they receive official notification from the Director of Residence Life.

All full-time students who have completed 30 or more credits may voluntarily apply for housing in the Student Living Complex on a semester basis.

Campus Housing Application
Rent is to be paid in full at the time of registration. Once a student has claimed the reservation by checking into the unit, he/she is financially obligated for the remainder of the semester. No deduction is made for late arrival at the beginning of the semester or for early departure at the end of the semester. Charges are subject to change with reasonable notice.

Prospective students are urged to submit an application at the earliest possible date. Assignments are made in the order in which completed housing applications are received at the Admissions Office.

Students who will be residing in campus housing must submit the completed application for housing and a $150 security deposit before an apartment can be assigned. If a student decides not to claim his/her apartment reservation, the deposit will be refunded up to 25 days before the beginning of the semester for which housing has been reserved. No refunds are given if cancellations are made after that date.

Occupancy of Campus Housing
Occupancy of campus housing is a privilege that is extended to full-time students of DCC. Continuation of this privilege is dependent upon reasonable and satisfactory personal conduct and proper care of the unit to which the student is assigned. The college reserves the right to refuse housing to anyone in order to ensure the health and safety of all residents.

Each unit will have these minimum furnishings: telephone, TV cable services, computer internet access, four extra-length (36 x 80 inch) single beds with mattresses, mattress covers, window blinds, shower curtain, four desks with chairs, four wardrobes, a mirror, dining table and four chairs, stove, refrigerator, couch, living room chair, end table, vacuum cleaner, and wastebasket. Furnishings and fixtures belonging to the Student Living Complex are not permitted to leave the unit.

The residents of the complex may provide other furnishings, except water beds, if they wish additional furniture. Bedding, bath linen, kitchen utensils, dishes and personal items must be provided by the residents. Roommates are urged to avoid duplication of small appliances, stereos, etc., when possible. Pets are not allowed in the complex.

Campus Housing Schedule
The specific opening and closing dates for residence halls will be sent to the students with their room assignments. All conditions of the housing rental agreement are stated in the Student Housing Handbook. The residence halls will be closed during Thanksgiving, Christmas, and spring break. Room charges do not include these vacation periods.

College personnel enter rooms only when it is in compliance with state laws. The college reserves the right to perform maintenance functions, to determine the condition of college property, to determine when emergency conditions are thought to exist and to determine when State and Federal laws are being violated.

When residents check out of the unit at the end of the term, the deposit will be refunded, less deduction for any damages provided all conditions of the rental agreement are met and the unit is in as-issued condition. A complete list of rules is in the Student Housing Handbook.

Disability – Housing Accommodation Statement
DCC does not discriminate against any student in the terms, conditions and privileges of residency due to physical or mental disability. When DCC becomes aware of any physical or mental disability which prevents an otherwise qualified student for residency from fulfilling their role as a qualified resident, prior to denying admission or refusing an accommodation, DCC will assess the request for disability accommodation to allow the person to be a qualified resident. An accommodation which creates an undue financial hardship on DCC or which endangers health or safety is not a reasonable accommodation. DCC will make any reasonable accommodation necessary to allow an otherwise qualified resident to fulfill the role of a qualified resident.

Other Housing
Students who are unable to obtain housing on campus, may find accommodations by contacting local Realtors, the Glendive Chamber of Commerce, or by checking the local newspaper.

Health Insurance
Student health insurance is available to students through area banks and insurance agents.

Library

The Jane Carey Memorial Library is located in the northeast wing of the main campus building. The library offers an inviting view of the Yellowstone River valley, while its study tables, casual seating, group study rooms, and computer availability provide an excellent study environment.

The college library supports the DCC curriculum by providing access to a wide variety of information resources. The library staff works closely with college faculty to provide materials needed for classes. The library collection includes approximately 20,000 book volumes, 100 periodicals subscriptions and through inter-library loan, the library has access to over one billion other titles. Computerized resources include online databases, indexes, periodicals, reference resources, and e-books. In addition, the library also has state documents, microfilm, microfiche, and a collection of audiovisual materials.

Access to the library’s electronic resources and the online library catalog is available (on- and off-campus) through the DCC Library web page. The online catalog provides quick and efficient access to library materials, not only at DCC, but also at a number of other Montana college libraries. In addition, the library has access to WorldCat allowing a patron to search more than 12,000 libraries worldwide. Services available to library patrons include inter-library loan, reference help, instruction in library usage, computer access, photocopying, scanning, and faculty reserve materials.

During the academic year, the library has regularly scheduled hours, Monday through Friday , including scheduled evening and weekend hours. Summer and holiday hours vary and are posted. Cooperation with other Glendive libraries is emphasized in order to offer a wide variety of materials and services to area library users.

Academic Support Services

Adult Basic Education
The Adult Career and Education Center on the Dawson Community College campus offers free individualized instruction in reading, English, and mathematics at the pre-college level. Tutors meet the varied needs of clients as the: attain their HiSET/GED; transition to college or technical programs; improve their employment prospects with career coaching using the Montana Career Information System (MCIS).

To become involved in tutoring and career coaching with Adult Career and Education Center staff, clients must commit to a minimum of four hours of class per week. The commitment begins with a mandatory orientation that helps in five important ways:

  • Evaluation: Pre-testing administered during the orientation helps clients discover subjects they need to study. 
  • Instruction: Based on the pre-test score the HiSET tutor creates a study plan and guides clients in preparation for the five HiSET test batteries.
  • Practice: The Adult Career and Education Center purchases the most current practice tests similar to the HiSET. These help clients obtain a better idea of what to expect during the HiSET tests. 
  • Readiness for the HiSET testing: Tutors help determine client readiness to take and pass the official HiSET tests.
  • Preparation for Career Training: The fundamental skills and contextualized instruction delivered by HiSET tutors will grow abilities needed to continue career training after earning a HiSET. 

This is an open enrollment program and is in session throughout the academic year. An online study option is available. HiSET study guides can be purchased in the Campus Store. To schedule an appointment contact: Jane Wynne, Coordinator/Instructor Adult Education and Institutional Testing, 406.377.9448 or 1.800.821.8320.

High School Equivalency (HiSET Testing)
Dawson Community College is authorized by the Montana Department of Public Instruction to administer the High School Equivalency Test (HiSET). Testing policies for the state of Montana enable adults 19 years and older and who are a resident of Montana to take the HiSET exam. Contact your state office for information about proof of residency. Before testing all documentation of eligibility must be presented at the testing site. A waiver of minimum age requirement, 16-18 years, may be obtained under special and warranted circumstances and must be reviewed and approved by the state administrator’s office before testing. For additional information contact the Adult Career and Education Center at 406.377.9448. 

Mid-Rivers Academic Support Center (tutoring services)
The Academic Support Center is open to all students who may need help with their academic subjects. Professional tutors are available, at no charge, to meet the needs of students. Other areas of need are handled through peer tutoring. Students may make appointments or drop-in for services. The Academic Support Center facilities are located adjacent to the library and include study areas and private testing rooms.

Co-curricular Activities

Dawson Community College welcomes students of all ages, backgrounds and needs. The College facilities and organizations offer a wide range of student opportunities for a full college experience. Students may participate in intercollegiate athletics, intramural activities, theater, art, and student organizations.

Intercollegiate Athletics
Dawson Community College athletic program provides student athletes opportunities to excel with both athletic and academic achievements. The intercollegiate level of competition is affiliated with the National Junior College Athletic Association with success in men and women’s basketball, women’s fast-pitch softball, and men’s baseball. The regional conference consists of colleges from Montana, North Dakota, Minnesota, and Wisconsin. Dawson Community College is also a member of the Mon-Dak Conference.

Under the governing body of the National Intercollegiate Rodeo Association, DCC men and women’s rodeo program competes in the Big Sky Region consisting of Montana and Wyoming two- and four-year colleges and universities. Through the strength of the program, DCC has produced regional and national champions.

Intramural Program
The Dawson Community College Intramural Program aims to provide students with the opportunity to participate in a wide range of recreational activities. Through participation, the individual will develop an appreciation of the worthy use of leisure time with a positive attitude toward physical activity and social interaction. Activities are organized on a team or individual basis enabling everyone from the interested beginner to the serious athlete to participate. 

Performing Arts
Students may participate in band, choir, and/or theatrical productions. These activities provide opportunities for the development of performance skills and appreciation. These groups participate in many college and community functions.

Student Organizations and Clubs

Associated Student Body (ASB) of DCC
All regularly enrolled full-time students of the College are members of the Associated Student Body of Dawson Community College. A Student Senate, elected as representatives of the freshman and sophomore classes, acts as a governing board for the ASB. The Senate plans recreation and social activities for students and participates with the faculty and the community in planning other college and community events. The Senate also participates in DCC governance via appointments to college committees. A portion of student fees paid each semester is routed to ASB to finance activities.

As the number of students at Dawson grows and as their interests diversify, new clubs and societies are formed on campus. Students or groups wishing to discuss the possibility of organizing a club or society should contact the Vice President of Student Affairs. Such new organizations will be subject to the approval of the student governing body.

Art Club
The goal of the Art Club is to support and enrich the artistic life of its members and the community at large through creativity and initiative, with art related activities and events such as workshops, exhibits, fund-raisers, and community service. All DCC students interested in art are welcome to participate.

Collegiate FFA/Ag Club
The National FFA Organization exists to provide agriculture-related programs and activities which will develop pride, responsibility, leadership, character, scholarship, citizenship, patriotism, career choices, and thrift, and which will improve the economic, environmental, recreational, and human resources of the community. The Collegiate FFA is open to all students interested in agriculture. High school participation in FFA is not a prerequisite. The Ag Club helps with many local agriculture organizations.

Criminal Justice Law Enforcement Club
Membership in this organization is encouraged for criminal justice law enforcement majors and students employed in the criminal justice field. The main objective of this organization is to promote professional standards in criminal justice and to develop understanding of the problems and objectives of those agencies that are devoted to the administration of criminal justice.

Dawson Intervarsity Christian Fellowship
A part of a nationwide international student organization of college and university campuses, this group is concerned with presenting Christianity as an important part of college and university life. Meetings are informal, infused with music and interaction. Dawson Intervaristy Christian Fellowship is open to all students with any or no religious background.

Music Club
The goal of the Music Club is to make a notable difference in the programs and social and extracurricular activities throughout DCC. Participation is open to all students involved in any aspect of the Music Department. The Dawson Community College Chapter of National Association for Music Education (NAfME) promotes the advancement of music education. It is a voluntary, nonprofit organization representing all phases of music education in schools, colleges, universities and teacher education institutions. Students involved in music and wishing to promote music are encouraged to join.

Phi Theta Kappa
Phi Theta Kappa, International Honor Society of the Two-Year College, is recognized by the American Association of Community Colleges as the official honor society for two-year colleges. Its purpose is to recognize and encourage scholarship among associate degree students having at least a 3.50 GPA. To achieve this purpose, Phi Theta Kappa provides opportunities for the development of leadership and service for an intellectual climate to exchange ideas and ideals, for lively fellowship for scholars, and for stimulation of interest in continuing academic excellence. Alpha Xi Epsilon, the DCC chapter of Phi Theta Kappa, was chartered in 1988.

Rodeo Club
Membership in this organization is open to all DCC students who are interested in promoting the sport of rodeo on campus. Its primary objective is to sponsor an annual rodeo for intercollegiate competition in the Big Sky Region.

W.R.I.T.E. Club (Writers Reaching for Intellectual and Textual Excellence)
The WRITE Club is a group of students who are interested in writing. The group participates in fund-raising activities to support the club’s literary publication: A.N.G.S.T. (A Novel of Gripping, Student Testimonies) which features student literary works, including poetry, short stories, novellas, as well as student art work. The main goal of the club is to publish the annual ANGST. Anyone with an interest in art, writing, or publishing is encouraged to join.

Standards of Student Conduct

With enrollment, the student accepts both the rights and responsibilities of DCC students. Accordingly, the College expects that each student will abide by civil laws and college policies/regulations. Students neither surrender their civil rights as citizens nor are they given immunity or special consideration with reference to civil or criminal law.

As members of the DCC community, students have the responsibility to study, to learn, and to conduct themselves with academic integrity in relation to the college, its mission, and its processes and functions as an institution of higher learning. Students, as citizens, are expected to be familiar with and comply with existing federal, state and city laws governing civil and criminal behavior both on- and off-campus and during all DCC functions.

Violations may result in disciplinary action by the college in addition to any civil or criminal action. A student may be dropped from enrollment whenever, in the opinion of the administration, his/her presence is not in harmony with the spirit of the college.

It is assumed that any student who enrolls at DCC is aware of the following expectations and responsibilities and that he/she will always abide by those realistic standards of achievement and citizenship that are conducive to self-growth and to the well-being of the college community.

Student conduct regulations are published in the student handbook which is available on the DCC website.

Alcohol/Drug Policy
Dawson Community College requires standards of conduct that prohibit the unlawful possession, use, and/or distribution of illegal and prescription drugs or alcohol by students and employees on institutional property. No alcohol/illegal drugs will be allowed in any of the rooms at the DCC Living Complex or in any area of the DCC Campus. Any violation will be subject to report to law enforcement authorities. For more information contact the Vice President of Student Affairs.

Loss of Personal Articles
The College does not accept responsibility for loss of or damage to personal articles in the event of theft or natural disasters such as flood, fire, or wind. The College shall not be liable for damages if the college’s performance of its obligation is necessarily curtailed or suspended due to storm, flood, or other acts of nature; fire, war, rebellion, scarcity of water, insurrection, riots, strikes or any other cause beyond the control of DCC.

Weapons/Ammunition
Ammunition or weapons are not allowed on campus or in campus housing. It is the student’s responsibility to make arrangements to store weapons off campus. If a student has a weapon for classroom use, it is his/her responsibility to make arrangements to store weapons off campus. The college provides class related weapons for classroom instruction and use when applicable.

Annual Crime Report
In November of 1990 the Student Right to Know Act was signed into law. The Act mandates that institutions of higher education report and make available to both current and prospective students and employees the occurrences of specific crimes on campus. In addition to the number of reported specified crimes, the institution must report the number of arrests for liquor violations, drug-abuse violations, and weapon violations. The report is available at www.dawson.edu, through the Vice President of Student Affairs and the EEO Office, Room 131A.

Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action
Dawson Community College is committed to equal opportunity for all persons in all facets of community college operations. Our policy has been, and will continue to be, one of nondiscrimination, offering equal opportunity to all students, employees, and applicants for employment on the basis of their demonstrated ability and competence without regard to such matters as race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, veteran status, marital or parental status, or disability.

Students who feel that they have been unfairly treated by the college with regards to policy, or disciplinary actions, have the right to request a hearing by an appeals board within two school days of any action that is taken. This may include complaints of discrimination based on race, color, religion, age, sex, national origin, political belief, veteran status, marital or parental status, or existence of a disability.

Reasonable Disability Accommodation
Dawson Community College will provide reasonable accommodations for qualified students with disabilities pursuant to Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act (Public Law 101-336) to ensure equal access to its programs. Students with disabilities who request accommodations must:

  • Register with the Student Affairs office. It is the student’s responsibility to initiate the request for services. Students are encouraged to initiate the request for accommodations as soon as possible.
  • Students who are requesting accommodations must provide documentation of their disability from the appropriate medical or psychological professionals. Documentation must be current; usually within the previous three years. Documentation must include a specific diagnosis. Actual test scores must be provided. A description of requested accommodations including the rationale for those accommodations must be provided.
  • Students requesting accommodations should notify their instructors of their disability as soon as possible. Student Affairs personnel will assist in this process if requested by the student.
  • Requests for accommodations will be evaluated on an individual basis.

If you believe you have been discriminated against based on disability and/or need a reasonable accommodation, talk to the Equal Opportunity Director/Vice President of Student Affairs, 406.377.9416 to solve any complaints. You also may contact the Montana Human Rights Commission at 406.444.2884 or 1.800.542.0807, TTD 406.444.0532.

Title IX – Title IX of the Educational Amendment of 1972 states:
No person in the United States shall, on the basis of sex, be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any education program or activity receiving Federal financial assistance.

The law has many applications such as providing equitable educational opportunities to all students. Dawson Community College affirms the right of all employees and students to work and study in an environment free from all forms of discrimination and harassment. Discrimination on basis of sex includes sexual harassment or sexual violence, such as rape, sexual assault, sexual battery, and sexual coercion. DCC is committed to providing a climate of mutual respect and is opposed to every practice that denies human dignity or actions that infringe upon academic and personal freedom.

Harassment Policy and Complaint Procedures
Sexual harassment and/or intimidation are a violation of federal and state laws. The State of Montana prohibits retaliation against any employee or student because he or she has filed a report of alleged harassment. Disciplinary action will be taken when instances of harassment, intimidation, or retaliation occur.

Sexual Harassment is defined legally as unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, and other verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature that affects an individual’s education, employment or work performance. Examples, but not limited to, are:

  • Activity or comments that create a hostile, intimidating or offensive environment;
  • Harassment occurred in an extreme single incident or from repeated actions;
  • Unwelcomed comments or actions made either directly or indirectly for educational or employment benefits “Quid pro quo”;
  • The complainant and the alleged perpetrator may be of either gender and need not be of different genders.

Sexual Intimidation is defined as any unreasonable behavior, verbal or non-verbal, which has the effect of subjecting members of either sex to humiliation, embarrassment or discomfort because of their gender.

  • Stalking or cyber stalking;
  • Electronic recording or distribution without knowledge and consent of all parties involved;
  • Comments or actions referring to different sexual orientation.

Sexual Assault is a particular type of sexual harassment that includes physical sexual acts perpetrated against a person’s will including an individual who is incapable of giving consent due to alcohol or drugs use.

  • Non-Consensual Sexual Contact;
  • Non-Consensual Sexual Intercourse;
  • Sexual exploitation and misconduct;
  • An act of power and control.

Other forms of Harassment can be defined as:

  • Messages which one can regard as irritating and offensive, violent or non-violent in nature;
  • A behavior which acts in flagrant disrespect for the well being of others;
  • Threats, whether or not a person has the intention of carrying out a threat, are a serious matter with possible criminal implications;
  • Bullying.

Reporting
Anyone who knows someone or has been subject to harassment or discrimination (including sexual harassment, sexual assault, sexual coercion or gender gender-based harassment) can and should report the incident.

If an assault occurred:

  • Get to a safe place as soon as possible;
  • Talk to someone you trust;
  • Preserve all the physical evidence;
  • Seek Medical attention.

A discrimination or harassment complaint may be brought forth by any member of the college community; administrators, faculty members, staff members, or students. Complaints will also be addressed if you are not employed or attending DCC but believe some form of discrimination or harassment may have occurred. Contact: Title IX Coordinator, Room 131A, 406.377.9416.

Other possible contacts to report violations: An Academic Advisor, Team Coach, Residence Hall Director, any employee, or Law Enforcement (911).

Although there is no specific time limit for reporting we encourage you to report this with the Title IX Coordinator as soon as possible. Seeking help immediately is critical as you can have evidence collected and stored without reporting the crime. In order to obtain essential evidence a forensic exam must be performed within 72 hours.

Each complaint will be investigated to determine what occurred. DCC will take steps to protect the complainant as deemed necessary during the pendency of the investigation and resolution process such as, but not limited to; no-contact order, restriction of access to classroom by students, or the College grounds by non-students or non-employees in certain circumstances. A complainant may seek a Temporary Order of Protection (TOP) that will issue a “no contact” order from a court of appropriate jurisdiction against the accused.

Through the reporting process, the complainant has the right to assistance or consultation by a friend or trained advocate. The College offers services to students through Student Affairs personnel. The Student Affairs staff will provide assistance and information on local resources available in a safe, supportive, and confidential setting. 

Complaints shall be defined as any informal (oral) or formal (written) allegation. Allegations of sexual assault may not be resolved by an informal resolution process. However, some harassment allegations may use an informal approach to resolve some cases involving the following:

  • The individual takes some steps which may stop the behavior;
  • The school initiates some actions informal or formal;

Formal charges under the school’s sexual harassment procedures can be filed by either the victim or the institution against the offender at any time.

Individual procedure is one option you can do as an individual. If you feel comfortable doing so, confront the harasser or write a letter informing the individual that his/her behavior is unwelcome, offensive or inappropriate and must stop. Other things to do: keep notes, write down your feelings, list any witnesses etc. Documentation is strongly recommended; notify your supervisor, advisor, coach, an instructor, or Title IX Coordinator for assistance with this or other procedures.

Informal procedure is aimed at stopping the behavior rather than determining culpability or intent, with the assistance of the Title IX/Affirmative Action Officer. It simply provides an alternative method for getting sexual harassment to end, which is usually what recipients of harassment want, rather than a vindication of their civil rights or achieving revenge. Why some choose informal procedures:

  • Less frightening;
  • Confidentially is easier to maintain;
  • Process may be educational for harasser;
  • Question/statements of he said…she said and similar issues may not be addressed;
  •  The complainant may play an active role in resolving the situation and this may feel empowered and less victimized;
  • Process provides several options for the victim;
  • The parties will not be required to deal directly with one another;
  • At any time, either the complainant or the accused may request that the informal resolution process be terminated, in which case the formal resolution process would begin.

An informal grievance will involve the complainant, the Title IX/Affirmative Action Officer, and the appropriate administrator. Every effort should be made to find an acceptable solution at the lowest possible management level.

Formal procedure. A written formal complaint will be filed with the Title IX Coordinator/Affirmative Action Officer. An investigation will be conducted to determine the facts of the incident. The college official designated to conduct the investigation will make an impartial judgment as to whether or not misconduct occurred, and, if so, propose appropriate sanctions. During this time, each person is given a chance to respond to evidence and potential charges. Individuals subjected to disciplinary action as the result of a report may file a grievance under the college grievance policy in the Student Handbook located under the Student Conduct Code.

Reporting Procedures
The College encourages reporting of all incidents of sexual misconduct, and respects the choices that individuals make regarding the methods of reporting:

1.File a report

  • Any campus employee informed of an allegation of sexual violence involving a student must, and will, report it promptly to the Title IX Coordinator.
  • Reporting is not the same as pressing charges but investigation is initiated
  • If the report involves crime being committed, the Coordinator will contact the local law enforcement agency. At any time the complainant can report to the Glendive Police Department at 406.377.2364 or crisis line at 406.989.1318.
  • If the evidence indicates that a threat of continued violence exists, a public warning will be issued. The timely warning will be made through a variety of resources that may include: DCC’s Squawker, email and phone mail, website, and local media.

2. The complainant will be advised of the options and services available on campus or within the local community.

3. Complaints will be investigated to determined what occurred

  • The college will conduct its own investigation and reserves the right to commence and/or complete its own investigation prior to the completion of any criminal investigation or criminal proceeding. It is independent of the Criminal Justice process.

4. All Parties will have an equal opportunity to present witnesses and other evidence for the investigation.
5. All parties will be provided with the investigation status and updates after 30 days.
6. The standard of a preponderance of evidence will be used(i.e. it is more likely than not that sexual harassment or violence occurred).
7. Parties will be notified in writing of the investigation, outcome and discipline sanctions imposed.
8. Mediation may not be an option used to resolve complaints of sexual assault.
9. Both parties will have the right to the same appeal process.
10. Retaliation against any person reporting or participating in an investigation of sexual harassment or sexual violence is prohibited.

Federal law requires the College to collect, publish, and distribute an annual security and crime report that includes statistics concerning the incidence of sexual offense and other serious crimes occurring on campus and on public property, in non-College buildings, or on non-College property. The reports do not include identifying information about survivors, but incidents included within the reports require confirmation. The function of these reports is to increase awareness of the extent of crime on campus and to foster the development of policies, procedures, and programs to prevent and report crime. The Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Report is made available through the Vice President of Student Affairs, DCC Website at https://www.dawson.edu/students/crime-report or http://ope.ed.gov/security.

Academic Policies

FERPA

Student records are guaranteed to be private under the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974. Information about a student, including his/her personnel file and academic record, will be released only with written permission.

Directory information (name, address, telephone number, e-mail address, photograph, major, dates of attendance, enrollment status, participation in officially recognized activities/sports, height/weight of athletic team members, degrees/honors/awards received) may be disclosed at the discretion of the Registrar, unless students specifically request this information to be withheld. Students have an opportunity during the first two weeks of each semester to grant or deny permission to release local directory information.

Those to whom information is given about a student (e.g., a four-year college to which he/she is applying) will be cautioned that the information obtained from Dawson Community College is to remain confidential unless further permission for its release is granted by the student. DCC will keep a record of persons other than Dawson Community College faculty and staff who request or obtain access to student files. Students may inspect their own educational records at any time.

Institution-Wide Learning Outcomes

Students who graduate from Dawson Community College with an Associate’s Degree will be able to demonstrate knowledge attainment in six Institution-Wide Learning Outcomes. The learning outcomes identified for each general education core align with one or more of the Institution-Wide Learning Outcomes. DCC provides the opportunity for students to successfully complete courses which incorporate knowledge in each of these areas. Upon completion, these students will be eligible to transfer to a four-year college or university or be prepared for employment.

Critical Thinking is the objective analysis and evaluation of issues, ideas, or assertions by collecting, researching, and judging relevant data, artifacts, perspectives, and their sources to form a judgment.

Effective Communication comprises oral and written communication. Oral Communication is expression designed to inform, instruct, persuade, or entertain the receiver. Written Communication is the development and expression of a message through the written word. Written communication involves working in multiple genres and styles, using relevant technologies, and skillfully combines test, data, and images to convey information to the reader.

Cultural Competency is the attainment of a set of cognitive, affective, and behavioral skills and characteristics that support effective and appropriate interaction in a variety of cultural contexts.

Scientific & Mathematical Proficiency in science refers to the ability to use the body of knowledge and the scientific method to explain the natural world, identify questions, and to draw evidence-based conclusions. Mathematical proficiency is the ability to develop and apply mathematical thinking in order to solve a range of problems in everyday situations. Building on a sound mastery of numeracy, the emphasis is on process and activity, as well as knowledge. Mathematical competence involves, to different degrees, the ability and willingness to use mathematical modes of thought (logical and spatial thinking) and presentation (formulas, models, constructs, graphs, charts).

Information Literacy is the ability to obtain and evaluate specific information to meet a wide range of personal, political, social, and business needs. The use of technology to store, organize, and access information is integral to this competency.

Mastery of Emphasis Area Content comprises familiarity with a body of knowledge, which may include a concentration or emphasis area and/or applied understanding and skills related to specific program objectives and outcomes developed at the program level.

Student Academic Integrity Guidelines

The student is responsible for cooperating with the instructor in his/her efforts to create a classroom environment that is conducive to the teaching/learning process. In order to do this, the student must become an active participant in the process and maintain an attitude of respect toward the instructor and other students. Students must conduct themselves in an orderly and responsible fashion or they will not be allowed to remain in the class. More specifically:

  • Students should be prompt and regular in attending classes, make appointments when necessary to meet with faculty and keep such appointments, be well-prepared for classes, and submit required assignments in a timely manner.
  • Integrity of the academic process requires that credit be given where credit is due. Accordingly, it is a breach of academic integrity to present as one’s own work, the ideas, representation or works of another, or to permit another to present one’s work without customary and proper acknowledgment of authorship. Students are expected to conduct themselves at all times within permissible limits of assistance as stated by the faculty.
  • Some of the more common breaches of academic integrity are as follows: unauthorized talking or moving about in class; heckling, badgering, or ridiculing classmates or the instructor; disruptive neglect of personal hygiene; disorderly, lewd, indecent, or obscene conduct; discriminating remarks or actions; verbal abuse; threatening actions or words; dishonesty (i.e., plagiarism, cheating, etc.); willful disobedience of the instructor in the performance of his/her duties.

Consequences for Infractions
Each instructor will be responsible for determining when the frequency, duration, or intensity of the behavior is beginning to compromise the instructional environment. This determination allows for differences in instructor style and tolerance and the content and context of each respective course. When an instructor judges a student to be violating these integrity guidelines and informal correction methods have not been effective, he/she will follow this procedure:

  • The instructor will indicate to the student, during class, that the behavior is unacceptable.
  • If the behavior persists the instructor will discuss the problem with the student outside of the classroom. This discussion should include a clear statement of what the instructor expects and of what will happen if the behavior continues. If the behavior continues, the student may be asked to leave class. At this time, the instructor should notify the Vice President of Academic Affairs, in writing, that he/she may have to remove the student from the course if the behavior does not improve.
  • If the behavior continues the instructor may withdraw the student from the class, with concurrence of the Vice President of Academic Affairs. The attempted corrective actions should be documented by the instructor and should accompany the withdrawal form.
  • If the disruptive behavior is occurring in other classes, or if it is of sufficient duration, intensity, or frequency, the Vice President of Academic Affairs may impose a two-week disciplinary suspension.
  • The student will attend a hearing with the President, the result of which may be expulsion.

Instructor Academic Integrity Guidelines

Individuals with teaching responsibilities present scholarship fairly, accurately, and objectively. Derivative scholarship acknowledges the source of intellectual property, and personal views, beliefs, and opinions are identified as such. The instructor retains the primary responsibility for establishing and maintaining an effective teaching/learning relationship with and among students. He/She must assure classroom conditions are such that they promote each student’s development, but not at the expense of other students. More specifically, the instructor is responsible for establishing and implementing academic standards, establishing and maintaining communication, and enforcing behavioral standards in the classroom that support these academic standards. If a student feels that an instructor has been remiss in honoring this responsibility, he/she may utilize the student grievance procedure to pursue resolution.

Student Grievance Procedure

  • The student should arrange a time to discuss the specific problem with the course instructor within one week of the occurrence of the problem.
  • If the problem persists the student should discuss the problem with his/her academic advisor. The advisor should take some action within one week of being notified of the problem by discussing the problem with the instructor and/or the Vice President of Academic Affairs, documenting the problem and possible resolution(s).
  • If a resolution is not met within one week of the advisor’s action/decision, the student/advisor may request a hearing with the Vice President of Academic Affairs. This request must be in writing, documenting specifically the problem, the dates and results of attempts to reconcile the problem, and the student’s desired resolution. The Vice President of Academic Affairs will then arrange a hearing with the student/advisor, instructor, and any parties involved to determine a course of action. All efforts to complete this process within one week of receiving the written appeal will be made.
  • If the resolution is unsatisfactory the student may request, again in writing, a hearing with the Academic Quality and Continuous Improvement Committee. The request should be forwarded to the Vice President of Academic Affairs who will place the issue on the agenda of the next Academic Quality and Continuous Improvement Committee meeting. The student will then be informed of the recommended resolution by the Committee members. At this level the decision is final.

Credits

The college academic year is divided into semesters and college work is measured in terms of semester credits. One semester credit is equivalent to approximately 45 hours of student involvement – usually 15 hours of classroom contact and 30 hours of outside class studying, researching, reading, etc. In general, a class that meets one hour per week throughout the semester yields one semester hour of credit. Science classes with a lab meet for five hours a week, while vocational lab classes meet six hours per week. Partial credit may be awarded in .5 credit increments, reflecting at least eight hours, but less than 15 hours, of direct contact or the equivalent.

Auditing Courses

A student who registers as an auditor attends class regularly but does not take the final examination, does not receive an achievement grade, and does not receive credit for the course. Students wishing to audit must meet all prerequisites required for the course and indicate their intention to audit at the time they register and pay for the course. Audited courses cannot be applied toward a degree or certificate and cannot be used to meet prerequisites.

Credit Overload

Students wanting to take more than 20 credits in a semester must have at least a 2.50 GPA and obtain permission from their advisor and approved by the office of the Vice President of Academic Affairs before being allowed to register.

Classification of Students

  • Full-time: students registered for 12 or more credit hours of class
  • Part-time: students registered for fewer than 12 credit hours
  • Regular: students who have satisfied the requirements for admission
  • Freshman: students having fewer than 30 credits
  • Sophomore: students having 30 or more credits

Curricula

DCC offers college-level transfer and vocational courses in a variety of disciplines. College-level classes are numbered 100 to 299. Generally, those identified as 100 to 199 are freshman level and those identified as 200 to 299 are sophomore level. Some sub-100 courses are also taught. Students should select sub-100 courses only on the recommendation of their advisor.

Online Courses
Dawson Community College is a member of the Colorado Community College Online Consortium. Through CCCOnline, students can obtain an accredited degree in the following areas:

  • Associate of Arts
  • Associate of Science
  • Associate of Applied Science in Business Management
  • Associate of Applied Science in Criminal Justice and Law Enforcement
  • Associate of Applied Science in Early Childhood Education

Contact 406.377.9411 or by email at [email protected] for more information.

  • All CCCOnline students will be charged a $35.00 distance learning fee per course in addition to the per credit hour fee.
  • Students must apply for admission to the college (see Student Services-Admissions). These students may also be eligible for Financial Aid (see Student Services-Financial Aid).
  • All fees must be paid in full prior to the issuing of a student PIN (course access code).
  • DCC will only accept registration for Session One courses that run concurrently with DCC’s fall, spring, and summer terms.

Web-enhanced Classes
Dawson’s online delivery utilizes Moodle media rich virtual classrooms to deliver the same instructional experience to students on and off campus. This tool allows online students to stream video and share textbook or classroom notes presented during lecture and discussion. Dawson’s online delivery allows full interaction between students and instructors for the best possible learning opportunity.

Accelerated Programs
Academic work toward completion of a degree may be accelerated in certain areas under the following provisions. Students should initiate such requests by consulting first with their advisor.

Advanced Placement Exams: DCC credit may be granted for students who successfully complete Advanced Placement Examinations in approved courses. Scores must be mailed directly to the DCC Registrar from the College Entrance Examination Board. A course will be posted as advance placement with a grade of ‘S’ when the student has completed a minimum of 12 DCC credits. A complete list of all equivalent courses for Advanced Placement is available from the Registrar’s office.

Challenging Courses: Any course may be challenged. Prior to challenging a course, a “request to challenge” form must be completed with the approval of the faculty member and Vice President of Academic Affairs. Any course previously taken as an audit course or as a credit course may not be challenged for credit.

College-Level Examination Program (CLEP): DCC recognizes the vast differences in background and preparation of individuals who are preparing to enter college. DCC utilizes the College Level Examination Program (CLEP). The purpose of this program is to allow students and prospective students to take examinations which measure knowledge in a variety of subject matter areas. Evaluation of the results determines whether proficiency is equivalent to that which would be expected upon completion of a college level course in that subject. Credits will be posted after the student earns 12 credits at DCC. Credits earned through CLEP apply toward graduation requirements. A satisfactory (S) grade is granted upon earning the required examination score. Students should consult with the Admissions Office for information concerning registration, cost, administration, and standards.

Course Substitution: Students may request a substitution for any stated course if they have previously completed a college course in which the subject learning outcomes closely parallels that of the course for which they request the substitution. All substitutions must be approved by the program director and Vice President of Academic Affairs. In no instance will a reduction be made in the number of credits required for any academic program. Forms are available in the Instructional Services Office.

CTE Course Waiver: A required program (CTE) course may be waived if the student has previously completed equivalent work. All waivers must be approved by the appropriate program director and the Vice President of Academic Affairs. General education core requirements cannot be waived. In no instance will college credit be given for a waiver. Forms are available in the Instructional Services Office.

Experiential Learning: Dawson Community College recognizes learning acquired outside of the traditional classroom setting and follows the Northwest Association Policy 2.3 for granting of experiential credit. Documentation submitted by the student for accomplishments on the job, through volunteer work, or through training, workshops and seminars based on time in service, job description, supervisor’s evaluation, relationship to the curriculum and credit recommendations from the American Council on Education (ACE) may be reviewed and considered for credit. Experiential learning credit granted by another institution may not be accepted for transfer to DCC. In addition, experiential learning credits granted by DCC may or may not transfer to other institutions.

Students seeking experiential learning credits must complete twelve (12) semester credits with a minimum GPA of 2.00 at Dawson Community College. Upon completion of the credit requirement, students should work with their academic advisor to complete an “Experiential Learning Request” form. The appropriate DCC Program Director and/or Division Chair will make a recommendation whether to grant experiential learning credit (and the number of credits as applicable) to the Vice President of Academic Affairs. The Vice President of Academic Affairs makes the final decision on whether the experiential learning credits are granted and, if so, how many credits are awarded.

Credit for prior experiential learning may constitute no more than 25% of the credits needed for a degree and/or certificate. Credits will only be granted to students enrolled in the semester during which an “Experiential Learning Request” form is submitted. Approved credits will be posted on a student’s transcript with a grade of satisfactory (S) and denoted as credit for experiential learning.

Community Interest Courses
Special interest courses are periodically scheduled to meet requests from the community at large. The courses do not carry credit, are not transferable, and do not apply to any degree.

Ed2Go
Ed2Go are short term, non-credit, continuing education courses online. Each course runs for six weeks with twelve self-paced lessons. Interactive quizzes, assignments, tutorials, and online discussion areas supplement the lessons. These courses are not eligible for financial aid.

Workforce Development
Courses that are customized for a special audience or business and delivered in a short format can be arranged in any area and may or may not carry college credit. Categories for this type of class include business development, teacher re-certification and educator development, and industrial skills development.

Workshops/Seminars/Special Topics
Periodically during the year, the college offers special workshops or seminars to meet the needs of the community for industry related, governmental, or re-certification training. These workshops and seminars may carry college credit and are advertised well in advance.

Video/Audio Recording

Students must obtain the instructor’s advance permission before recording any classroom lectures/presentations. This permission will include specifications of what may be recorded, how it may be used, and for how long. This “intellectual property” policy has been adopted to protect the integrity of these presentations.

Cheating and Plagiarism

Students at Dawson Community College are expected to do their own work and in their own words and with their own ideas. If they quote or paraphrase the words of others, they are expected to indicate who it is they are paraphrasing. An instructor, who believes a student has cheated or claimed the work of someone else as his/her own, may take disciplinary steps as outlined under Academic Integrity Guidelines. This may include, but not be limited to, giving a failing grade or referring the student to others for further discipline.

Class Attendance Policy

Dawson Community College supports the philosophy that learning is optimal when students attend classes regularly and participate in the learning environment through interaction with colleagues and instructors. Therefore, the student is responsible for maintaining regular attendance in registered classes. Approved absences due to college sponsored activities are excused. Absences due to serious illness or strictly unavoidable circumstances may be excused if the instructor is completely satisfied as to the cause. An excused absence does not, under any circumstances, relieve the student of the responsibility for completing the course work to the satisfaction of the instructor.

Changing Course Registration

After a student has registered for classes, changes to his/her class schedule requires official notice to the Registrar’s Office via a drop/add slip. The drop/add slip requires the signatures of the student’s academic advisor and the instructor(s) of the course(s). A representative from the Instructional Services Office signs on behalf of adjunct instructors if needed.

Adding a Course
Students may add a class up through the 10th instructional day of the fall and spring semesters. Workshops, short-courses (including summer courses) and other nontraditional courses may be added within the first 10% (approximately) of the course subject to approval by the instructor. A student seeking to add a course that results in a course load of 21 or more semester credits requires the approval of the Vice President of Academic Affairs.

Dropping a Course
Students may drop a class up through the 10th instructional day of the fall and spring semesters. A course that has been dropped within this time-frame will not appear on a student’s transcript. Workshops, short-courses (including summer courses) and other nontraditional courses may be dropped no later than two (2) business days prior to the start of the course. Students are strongly encouraged to work with their academic advisor as dropping a class may impact progress toward a degree/certificate, enrollment status and financial aid status.

Withdrawing From a Course
Students may withdraw from a course on any class day during the regular class semester, but not after finals have commenced. If the withdrawal takes place on the 11th-55th instructional day a grade of ‘W’ will be placed on the transcript. A ‘W’ grade has no grade point average (GPA) value and will not change the student’s previous cumulative GPA.

If the withdrawal takes place after the 55th instructional day a grade of ‘WF’ will be placed on the transcript. A ‘WF’ grade will be calculated within the GPA in the same manner as an ‘F’.

Students wanting to withdraw from all courses must complete a ‘Withdrawal From School” form and submit it to the Registrar’s Office. The form is available in the Student Services Office.

Administrative Withdrawal
Students who fail to attend the first two (2) meetings of a limited-enrollment course may be dropped from the course by the instructor. If a student knows that he/she will not be able to attend either of the first two (2) meetings should contact the instructor prior to the first day of class. An administrative withdrawal will only be enforced if a limited-enrollment course is full. Students should not rely on an administrative withdrawal but rather are expected to take the initiative to complete the required procedure to drop a course.

Fresh Start Policy (Academic Bankruptcy)

The Fresh Start option is a one-time opportunity for DCC students to begin a new cumulative (or Fresh Start) GPA. This allows students to “bankrupt” previous coursework they have completed at DCC in which they received poor grades. Although the bankrupted coursework will remain on the student’s academic record, the credits and grades will not be carried forward into the student’s cumulative GPA. Students should note that all previous DCC grades and credits will be excluded and will not be used to fulfill any degree requirements when the Fresh Start option is chosen. To be eligible for the Fresh Start option, students:

  • Must not be enrolled in any institution of higher education for a minimum of five years, and;
  • Will be placed on academic probation when returning to college, and;
  • Must complete 15 credits in residence with at least a GPA of 2.50 upon their return to DCC, and;
  • Must apply for the Fresh Start option within one calendar year after returning to DCC, and during the semester following that in which he/she meets the eligibility requirements.

Students wishing to petition for a Fresh Start GPA should contact the Registrar.

Grades/Grading Policy

A student’s evaluation is based upon grades. Grade reports are issued after each semester, providing that the student’s credentials and financial obligations to the college are fulfilled. The grading system values (A through F), as established by the Montana Board of Regents, are listed below.

A Excellent 4.0
A – 3.7
B + 3.3
B Above Average 3.0
B – 2.7
C + 2.3
C Average 2.0
C – 1.7
D + 1.3
D 1.0
D – Minimum Achievement 0.7
F Failure to Meet Course Standards 0.0

Other

  • W = Withdrawal (given pursuant to drop/add policy).
  • I = Incomplete (given pursuant to incomplete policy). The work must be completed by the following regular semester. A permanent grade of A-F or S/U will then be assigned.
  • N = No credit is earned. Audit must be declared at time of registration.
  • S/U = Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory – S = Satisfactory (C- or better), U = Unsatisfactory (D+ or less).
  • S/U grade option may be given for physical education activity courses, extension classes, seminars, and workshops. S/U is mandatory for work and field internships.

The instructor for the course selects the grading option as outlined in the course syllabus, and utilizes it for the entire class and term.

Special Note: A course that is used to satisfy the prerequisites or required courses in an Associate of Arts, Associate of Science, Associate of Applied Science or a Certificate of Applied Science must be passed with a “C-” or better. A course that is used to satisfy a general education program must be passed with a “C-” or better. (Montana Board of Regents Policy 301.5.3).

The Grade Point Average (GPA) is computed by dividing the total grade points by the number of credits attempted. Grades of S, U, W, I and N/Audit are not included in calculating the GPA.

Grade Changes
Students questioning a grade received on their official transcript must contact the instructor before the completion of the following term. Grade changes are not allowed after one semester has elapsed except in unusual circumstances. Student appeals must go through the Vice President of Academic Affairs.

Incomplete (“I”) Grades
Students are expected to complete the course work for a class during the time designated. Occasionally, circumstances prevent timely completion and the student may request extra time to finish the work. A form to apply for such an extension is available from the Registrar. This form must be signed by the student, the instructor, and the Vice President of Academic Affairs.

In all cases, an “I” is given at the discretion of the instructor with the concurrence of the Vice President of Academic Affairs following these guidelines:

  • The student has been in attendance, is doing passing work (C- or better), and has completed a minimum of 75% of the course.
  • For reasons beyond the student’s control, and which are acceptable to the instructor, he/she has been unable to complete the requirements of the course on time. In certain cases the Vice President of Academic Affairs may be requested to certify personal hardship cases.
  • The instructor must set the conditions for the removal of the incomplete on an “application for incomplete” form which is provided by the Registrar. When completed by the instructor and signed by the instructor and the student, this form must be filed with the Registrar.
  • The instructor determines the deadline for a student to fulfill the requirements outlined in the “application for incomplete” form (not to exceed the last day of the following semester).
  • A grade of “incomplete” that is not made up in the prescribed time will automatically become an “F”.

Methods of Determining Credit
Course credit is based on semester hours. One semester hour of credit usually represents 50 minutes of class time per week for a semester. Some courses with laboratory sessions meet for longer periods of time per semester hour of credit.

Repeating Courses
Any course at DCC may be repeated. Only the most recent grade and credits earned for a course toward cumulative GPA calculations and graduation requirements is used. This applies for all grades including a lower grade than previous attempts. Repeated courses are denoted on a student’s transcript with the use of “*1” and “*2” for the first and second attempts, respectively. Subsequent attempts follow this pattern (“*3” etc.). Students receiving financial aid should check with the Financial Aid Office before repeating a course.

Scholastic Honors
Students who carry a full load (12 or more semester hours) of work graded with grade points and who earn a G.P.A. of a 3.5 or higher for the semester will be placed on the Presidential Honor List.

Those students who have a G.P.A. of at least 3.25 and less than 3.50 are given honorable mention. Names of students with “I” (incomplete) grades for the semester will not be placed on these lists.

Graduation

Those who are eligible for degrees or certificates must file an application in the Registrar’s office during the semester preceding the semester in which they expect to graduate and pay the graduation fee at this time. Only those students who have met the requirements for graduation from DCC and who have applied by the deadline may participate in the ceremony.

Anyone who does not have a cumulative G.P.A. of 2.00 at the end of fall semester must reapply spring semester. A student may graduate by fulfilling requirements for a certificate or degree in any DCC catalog under which he/she has been enrolled as a full-time student during the five years prior to graduation. The catalog in effect at the time of matriculation will be used unless otherwise specified by the student.

A student who completes all of the degree requirements and has at least a 3.5 overall G.P.A. will graduate from DCC with Honors.

Catalog
A student may graduate under the degree/certificate curriculum in any one DCC catalog under which she/he has been enrolled as a full-time student during the five (5) years prior to graduation. The catalog in effect at the time of matriculation will be used unless otherwise specified by the student (per the graduation application). Students who are not enrolled at DCC for twelve (12) continuous months must use the catalog in effect at the time they return to school.

Scholastic Probation/Suspension
A student whose grade point average is 1.75 or below in any given semester will be placed on scholastic probation. This student must then consult with his/her advisor before being allowed to register for more than 12 credits. A student whose cumulative GPA remains below 2.00 after the probation semester may be suspended from school and one full semester of non-enrollment may be required.

Standards for Veterans
Any student receiving benefits from the Veterans Administration will be counseled by the certifying official about benefits, credit load, withdrawal procedures, remedial and tutorial assistance, and his/her own responsibilities in these matters. 

Satisfactory Progress: Any veteran receiving educational benefits from the Veterans Administration is expected to progress satisfactorily toward an educational goal and must meet the following standards:

  • Any veteran whose grade point average is 1.75 or below in any given semester will be placed on scholastic probation and will be required to receive special counseling by the certifying official before registering the next semester.
  • VA educational benefits will be terminated for any veteran whose cumulative grade point average is less than 2.00 for two consecutive semesters.
  • A “W” will be reported to the Veterans Administration.
  • A 2.00 GPA is required at the completion of 60 credits.

Tests
All tests, including final examinations which are counted as part of the instructional calendar, should be taken at the designated time. In emergency cases, the instructor’s approval is required before the student is released of his/her exam responsibility.

Transfer of Credits

The student who wishes to transfer his/her credits to another institution should plan accordingly. Although students receive academic advising, the student must assume the responsibility for knowing the requirements of the college to which he/she will transfer.

Colleges and universities vary in their policies regarding what courses may be credited toward advanced standing. Dawson Community College has every assurance from the units of the Montana University System that courses that were properly selected and credits that were earned will be accepted.

Official transcripts of credits earned at DCC will be sent to other institutions only upon the written request of the student. Forms are available in the DCC Main Office. DCC reserves the right to withhold transcripts from students who are in debt to the institution. Students have the right to discuss the matter with the business office personnel to resolve any disputes.

Montana Board of Regents of Higher Education Transfer Policy
The Montana University System is committed to facilitating the ease of undergraduate student transfer to its campuses, particularly in the area of general education. Therefore, all campuses of the Montana University System will recognize the integrity of general education programs and courses offered by units of the Montana University System, Montana’s three publicly supported community colleges, the seven tribal colleges, and regionally accredited independent colleges in the State of Montana.

The Block Transfer Procedure: An undergraduate student who has completed the lower division coursework in an approved general education program at one of the institutions noted above, and who transfers to another of those institutions, will be deemed to have met the lower division general education requirements of the campus to which the student transfers.

The Montana University System Core: If the student has completed less than 20 general education credits, that student will be required to complete the approved general education program at the campus to which he/she transfers. If the student has completed more than 20 general education credits, but does not satisfy the block transfer policy, that student may choose to complete either the MUS core or the approved general education program at the campus to which he/she transfers.

Associate of Arts and Associate of Science Degrees: A student who has completed an Associate of Arts or an Associate of Science degree with an approved general education component package at another unit of the Montana University System, has satisfied the requirements of this policy.

In each situation the student may be required to take additional coursework at the upper division level that is part of an approved general education program at the new campus. (Montana Board of Regents of Higher Education Policy and Procedures Manual. 301.10, Revised May 20, 2005).

Academic Programs

General Education Common Core

  • Core I: Communications
  • Core II: Fine Arts/Humanities Cat I Production/Performance and Category II Appreciation/Theory
  • Core III: Social Sciences/History
  • Core IV: Natural Sciences
  • Core V: Mathematics and Computer Applications 
  • Core VI: Multicultural/Global Perspective

The mission of General Education Core courses is to ensure a broad based general education to all Dawson Community College students regardless of their area of study.

The goals of the General Education Core are to provide students with the opportunity to develop his/her creative and intellectual potential. Beginning in school, and continuing at successively higher levels across their college studies, students should prepare for twenty-first century challenges. Students completing the requirements of the general education common core will have met minimum learning outcomes in broad based general education with abilities in the areas of:

  • Critical Thinking
  •  Effective Communication
  • Cultural Competency
  • Scientific and Mathematical Proficiency
  • Information Literacy
  • Mastery of Emphasis Area Content

In determining the core requirements cited below, the Dawson Community College General Education Assessment Committee reviewed the Montana University System General Education Core criteria as guidelines to determine the common core for our transfer students. Please note in some cases an individual course may transfer to one school, but not another.

Both the AA and AS degrees utilize a common core, this means that the general education requirements are the same for both degrees. No course may be used to satisfy the requirement for more than one core. Courses taken in addition to the common core will determine whether the degree will be an AA or an AS.

Core I – Communications – 6 credit hours

The Communications core supports the student achievement of junior level transfer to a university. It also provides a vital component of the occupational skills curriculum and promotes life-long learning opportunities. Students are provided with knowledge and skills that will aid in the accomplishment of life goals. The student will be able to accomplish four or more of the following:

  • Communicate in standard American English;
  • Write extended essays and speeches which effectively develop and support theses, narratives, events, and/or express feelings, insights, and personal values; 
  • Incorporate and cite research materials into informative and analytical communication;
  • Demonstrate the ability to communicate effectively with a variety of audiences;
  • Demonstrate effective listening skills by critiquing the communication of others.

Core I Graduation Requirements

  • WRIT101 College Writing I 3cr
  • Select three credits from the following:
    • COMX111 Intro to Public Speaking
    • WRIT201 College Writing II
    • WRIT202 College Writing III

Core II – Fine Arts and Humanities – 6 credit hours

The Fine Arts and Humanities core is designed to facilitate and prepare transfer students to achieve junior level status at a senior institution. The curriculum explores those components of the liberal arts education related to literature, visual arts, music, theater, humanities, ethics, and philosophy. Parallel courses in theory and performance provide a complete experience within these vital components of higher education. These courses, also, supplement occupational programs, provide and promote lifelong learning, and achieve basic knowledge of the creative endeavors of humanity.

The student will be able to accomplish two or more of the following:

Category I Production and Performance:

  • Demonstrate the technical and expressive skill, methods, practice, and production of a fine art form.
  • Demonstrate an aspiration and appreciation for the beneficial application of traditional and experimental inquiry, focused practice, and the conceptual precepts of the creative process in developing a fine art work.

Category II Appreciation and Theory:

  • Articulate an understanding of the basic elements, principles, and practices of a fine art during the historic eras of its development and its relationship to other academic disciplines and applied fields.
  • Compare and contrast world cultures, their global influence, social beliefs, and their practices and production of works of art.
  • Explain the important insights works of art have contributed to the expression and understanding of human capabilities, dilemmas, and aspirations.
  • Discuss great works of art which have decisively influenced or been influenced by the course of history.
  • Describe and critically assess prominent theories on the nature of reality, and the qualities and requirements of a meaningful life.

Category I and II:

  • Make informed observations and evaluations concerning the aesthetic, entertainment, intellectual, and social value of a work of art.
  • Demonstrate an appreciation of the creative process.
  • Demonstrate empathy for the personal in the universal, as revealed in the fine arts and humanities. Formulate and articulate a tentative personal philosophy of life, after reflecting on important personal experiences, and the way family and culture have shaped one’s beliefs in light of the models and theories of human behavior one has encountered in their studies.

Select three credits from each Category

Category I: Production/Performance 3cr

  • ARTH101 Foundations of Art 3cr
  • ARTZ105 Visual Language – Drawing 3cr
  • ARTZ211 Drawing I – Figure 3cr
  • ARTZ212 Drawing Studio 3cr
  • ARTZ221 Painting I 3cr
  • ARTZ222 Painting Studio 3cr
  • ARTZ224 Watercolor I 3cr
  • ARTZ225 Watercolor Studio 3cr
  • CRWR240 Intro to Creative Writing 3cr
  • MUSI103 Fundamentals of Musical Creation 3cr
  • MUSI262 Chamber Ensembles II: Dawson 1cr
  • MUSI147 Choral Ensemble: Dawson 1cr
  • MUSI114 Band: Dawson 1cr
  • MUSI214 Band: Dawson 1cr
  • MUSI115 Drumline I 1cr
  • MUSI215 Drumline II 1cr
  • MUSI112 Choir: Dawson 1cr
  • MUSI212 Choir II: Dawson 1cr
  • MUSI160 Beginning Guitar 1cr
  • MUSI195 Applied Music I 1cr
  • MUSI295 Applied Music II 1cr
  • MUSI135 Keyboard Skills I 1cr
  • MUSI136 Keyboard Skills II 1cr
  • MUSI235 Keyboard Skills III 1cr
  • MUSI236 Keyboard Skills IV 1cr
  • MUSI150 Beginning Voice 1cr
  • MUSI151 Beginning Voice II 1cr
  • MUSI250 Beginning Voice III 1cr
  • MUSI251 Beginning Voice IV 1cr
  • PHOT154 Exploring Digital Photography 3cr
  • ?HTR108 Theater Experience 1cr

Category II: Appreciation/Theory 3cr

  • ARTH101 Foundations of Art 3cr
  • ARTH160 Global Visual Culture: Art Appreciation 3cr
  • ARTH200 Art of World Civilization I 3cr
  • ARTH201 Art of World Civilization II 3cr
  • LSH101 Intro to Humanities Contemporary 3cr
  • LIT110 Introduction to Literature 3cr
  • LIT285 Mythologies 3cr
  • LIT210 American Literature I 3cr
  • LIT211 American Literature II 3cr
  • LIT223 British Literature I 3cr
  •  LIT224 British Literature II 3cr
  • MUSI101 Enjoyment of Music 3cr
  • MUSI103 Fundamentals of Musical Creation 3cr
  • MUSI106 Music Theory II 3cr
  • MUSI203 American Popular Music 3cr
  • PHL101 Introduction to Philosophy 3cr
  • PHL110 Introduction to Ethics 3cr
  • THTR101 Introduction to Theater 3cr

Core III – Social Sciences/History – 6 credit hours

Students will study people and institutions, and the forces and movements that affect them. This knowledge will help us understand the history so we can anticipate the future with more clarity. The perspectives and methods of the social sciences provide a basic foundation for understanding, evaluating, and decision-making related to the human phenomena and experience. These courses support transfer to senior institutions and supplement the occupational program curricula and lifelong learning.

The student will demonstrate mastery in the following areas:

  • Describe the major focuses/purposes of the social sciences (psychology, sociology, history, geography, and economics);
  • Name at least two major social institutions and describe their impacts on the daily existence of individual;
  • Gather information, analyze data, and draw conclusions in selected areas of the social sciences;
  • Synthesize ideas and information explaining historical events, their causes and some of their consequences;
  • Analyze human ideas and behaviors behind selected social institutions for historical and cultural meaning; and,
  • Apply the concepts used to describe relationships between humans, organizations, and the environment.

Select courses from the following (two different disciplines must be represented):

  • ANTY101 Anthropology and the Human Experience 3cr
  • CJUS121 Introduction to Criminal Justice 3cr
  • ECNS201 Principles of Microeconomics 3cr
  • ECNS202 Principles of Macroeconomics 3cr
  • GPHY141 Geography of World Regions 3cr
  • HSTA101 American History I 3cr
  • HSTA102 American History II 3cr
  • HSTA160 Intro to the American West 3cr
  • HSTR101 Western Civilization I 3cr
  • HSTR102 Western Civilization II 3cr
  • NASX105 Intro Native Am Studies 3cr
  • PSCI210 Intro American Government 3cr
  • PSCI260 Intro State/Local Government 3cr
  • PSYX100 Intro to Psychology 3cr
  • PSYX230 Developmental Psychology 3cr
  • PSYX272 Educational Psychology 3cr
  • SOCI101 Introduction to Sociology 3cr
  • SOCI201 Social Problems 3cr

Core IV – Natural Sciences – 7 credit hours

The natural science core provides the student with the fundamental concepts of physical and biological sciences. These will be broad-based courses that introduce a student to the field of science. Students must take at least one designated laboratory course selected from physics, chemistry, geography, geology, or biology to provide direct experience with scientific inquiry.

The goals of the natural science core curriculum are to enable the student to accomplish two or more of the following:

  • Define the fundamental concepts of modern science through courses in the natural sciences;
  • Continue education in scientifically oriented fields at senior institutions;
  • Identify and solve problems using methods of the discipline;
  • Gather empirical data through scientific experimentation and analyze this data to make predictions about the natural world;
  • Demonstrate how the scientific method is used to develop scientific knowledge.

Select courses from the list below:

Courses with labs:

  • BIOB160 Principles of Living Systems 3cr
  • BIOB161 Principles of Living Systems Laboratory 1cr
  • BIOB170 Principles of Biological Diversity 3cr
  • BIOB171 Principles of Biological Diversity Laboratory 1cr
  • BIOB101 Discover Biology 3cr
  • BIOB102 Discover Biology Laboratory 1cr
  • BIOO105 Introduction to Botany 3cr
  • BIOO106 Introduction to Botany Lab 1cr
  • BIOH201 Human Anatomy/Physiology I 3cr
  • BIOH202 Human Anatomy/Physiology I Lab 1cr
  • BIOH211 Human Anatomy/Physiology II 3cr
  • BIOH212 Human Anatomy/Physiology II Lab 1cr
  • BIOM250 Microbiology for Health Sciences 3cr
  • BIOM251 Microbiology for Health Sciences Lab 1cr
  • CHMY121 Intro General Chemistry 3cr
  • CHMY122 Intro General Chemistry Lab 1cr
  • CHMY123 Intro Organic/Biochemistry 3cr
  • CHMY124 Intro Organic/Biochemistry Lab 1cr
  • CHMY141 College Chemistry I 4cr
  • CHMY142 College Chemistry Lab I 1cr
  • CHMY143 College Chemistry II 4cr
  • CHMY144 College Chemistry Lab II 1cr
  • GEO101 Intro Physical Geology 3cr
  • GEO102 Intro Physical Geology Lab 1cr
  • GEO125 Intro to Dinosaur Paleontology 3cr
  • GEO126 Intro to Dinosaur Paleontology Lab 1cr
  • GPHY111 Intro Physical Geography 3cr
  • GPHY112 Intro Physical Geography Lab 1cr
  • PHSX105 Fundamentals of Physical Science 3cr
  • PHSX106 Fundamentals of Physical Science Lab 1cr
  • PHSX220 Physics I 3cr
  • PHSX221 Physics I Lab 1cr
  • PHSX222 Physics II 3cr
  • PHSX223 Physics II Lab 1cr
    Courses without labs:
  • GEO111 Dinosaurs 3cr
  • ENSC105 Environmental Science 3cr

Core V – Mathematics and Computer Applications – 6 credit hours (3M/3CAPP)

Comprehension of elementary quantitative concepts, development of quantitative reasoning skills, and the ability to reasonably ascertain the implications of quantitative information are the goals of the mathematics courses. This will include classes that prepare the student for transfer to a senior institution, as well as introductory classes to prepare students for college level classes and/or a certificate program. As a minimum, each course approved in this discipline area includes Intermediate Algebra (M095) as a prerequisite.

The computer applications core requirement supports the needs of all students to be computer literate in our technological world. The curriculum supports the requirements of transfer students, occupational students and the community for lifelong learning. Information retrieval, communications, and e-commerce require that the mission of the college support the basic need for knowledge and skills in computer applications.

Sub-100 classes are intended to help students achieve a level of knowledge and skill that will help insure successful performance in higher level courses. These courses cannot be used for graduation as Math or English requirements.

Upon completion of Core V, students will be able to:

  • Apply acquired skills to other courses;
  • Reason analytically and quantitatively;
  • Think critically and independently about mathematical situations;
  • Understand the quantitative aspects of current events;
  • Make informed decisions that involve interpreting quantitative information;
  • Create, edit, format, save, and print documents in common software applications;
  • Use Internet tools to research and communicate electronically.

Select courses from the list below:

  • M121 College Algebra 4cr
  • M130 Math Elementary Teachers I 4cr
  • M131 Math Elementary Teachers II 4cr
  • M145 Math for the Liberal Arts 3cr
  • M151 Pre-calculus 4cr
  • M171 Calculus I 5cr
  • M172 Calculus II 5cr
  • STAT216 Introduction to Statistics 4cr

Computer Course (required)

  • CAPP131 Basic MS Office 3cr

Core VI – Multicultural/Global Perspective – 3 credit hours

Graduates of Dawson Community College face an ever changing and increasingly complex world. An understanding of, and sensitivity to, other cultural perspectives prepares them to function in the global community. Multicultural courses focus on cultures that differ substantially from the dominant U.S. culture and/or western European influences. The values and belief systems of these cultures are explored and interaction among cultures is examined. Multicultural global perspective courses address ethical, economic, religious, and political relationships among interacting cultures.

Upon completion of Core VI, students will be able to:

  • Describe various belief systems as to their significance in shaping culture’s values and norms.
  • Discuss ethnocentrism and how it impacts cross-cultural communication.
  • Describe the significance of the core areas of ancient civilizations; to include China, India, Mesopotamia, Egypt, and the Americas.
  • Analyze the structural relationship in multicultural societies with regard to power and influence.

Select courses from the list below:

  • ANTY101 Anthropology and the Human Experience 3cr
  • ARTH160 Global Visual Culture: Art Appreciation 3cr
  • ARTH200 Art of World Civilization I 3cr
  • EDU231 Literature and Literacy for Children 3cr
  • GPHY141 Geography of World Regions 3cr
  • HSTA250 Plains Indian History 3cr
  • HSTR160 Modern World History 3cr
  • HSTR286 World Religions and Society 3cr
  • LIT285 Mythologies 3cr
  • MUSI101 Enjoyment of Music 3cr
  •  MUSI103 Fundamentals of Musical Creation 3cr
  • MUSI203 American Popular Music 3cr
  • NASX105 Intro to Native Am Studies 3cr
  • SIGN120 Sign Language I 3cr
  • SOCI236 Intro Race/Ethnic Relations 3cr
  • SPNS101 Elementary Spanish I 4cr
  • SPNS102 Elementary Spanish II 4cr
  • THTR101 Introduction to Theater 3cr

Curriculum Transfer Plans

Associate of Arts and Associate of Science

The Associate of Arts (AA) and Associate of Science (AS) are transfer degrees that are awarded without designation of major, but do follow curriculum transfer plans. These degrees indicate that a student has completed a course of study that is essentially equivalent to the first two years of a baccalaureate degree. Usually, the AA degree is the best choice for students majoring in humanities, liberal arts or the social sciences; the AS degree is usually the best option for students majoring in math, science, engineering or business. Students who are seeking an AA or AS degree must complete the general education core requirements and transfer credits to fulfill the 60 credits needed for the degree.

AA and AS Transfer Degree Requirements:

  • 34 credit hours of General Education Core courses
  • 9 credits from AA or AS disciplines depending on transfer degree being pursued
  • 60 credit hours in courses numbered 100 or above
  • 2.00 GPA
  • minimum of 20 credits completed at DCC

All AA/AS Transfer Degrees require:

  • CAPP131 Basic MS Office
  • WRIT101 College Writing

Students may follow the curriculum suggested in one of the areas of emphasis below. If a student wishes to earn an additional Associate Degree he/she must take an additional 15 credits. Nine of these 15 must be taken from the AA/AS emphasis of the second degree.

Curriculum transfer plans are included for most major fields of study to facilitate the completion of course requirements toward transfer into higher education degree (BA/BS) programs. The courses listed are suggested for their high potential to transfer. Students who are planning to transfer should obtain a catalog from the university they wish to attend. They should then work with a DCC advisor to assure that the proper courses are being taken. Together the student and advisor will select courses that will fit into the program at the transfer institution.

In all instances, students considering a specific transfer area should:

  • Determine as soon as possible the school to which one wishes to transfer and obtain a catalog from that school.
  • Study the entrance requirements for the school and find the specific course requirements for freshmen and sophomores in the major field of interest.
  • Upon being assigned a DCC faculty advisor, meet with him/her to determine the DCC and senior institution requirements.
  • Confer, either by letter or by personal interview, with an admissions officer or department chair of the university program for further information about curriculum and transfer regulations.
  • A semester before the transfer, check with the senior institution to confirm that all requirements have been satisfactorily met.
  • Check with the senior institution for specific directions regarding where to send the DCC transcript, how to apply for admission, and if there are any special requirements such as minimum GPA or special tests which could be a part of their entrance requirements.

Sub-100 classes are intended to help students achieve a level of knowledge and skill that will help insure successful performance in higher level courses. These courses cannot be used for graduation as Math or English requirements.

Associate of Arts
Areas of Concentration

An AA designated degree will require a concentration of nine (9) credits beyond the General Education Core requirements from:

  • Art
  • Chemical Dependency Counseling
  • Communications
  • Economics
  • Education
  • English
  • Foreign Language
  • Geography
  • History
  • Liberal Studies/Humanities 
  • Music
  • Native American Studies
  • Physical Education Activities
  • Psychology
  • Political Science
  • Sociology
  • Theater

Note: if placement test scores indicate below 100 level courses are necessary adjustments would need to be made when selecting courses

Associate of Arts
Plan of Study

First Year – Fall Semester – Total: 15+cr

  • Core I: Communications, WRIT101 College Writing I = 3cr
  • Core II: Fine Arts/Humanities, Category I Production/Performance OR
  • Core II: Fine Arts/Humanities, Category II Appreciation/Theory = 1-3cr
  • Core IV: Natural Sciences, Select a Lecture/Lab Course = 4cr
  • Core V: Mathematics & Computer Applications, CAPP131 Basic MS Office = 3cr
  • Electives = Select 4+cr

First Year – Spring Semester – Total: 15+cr

  • Core I: Communications, COMX111 Intro to Public Speaking = 3cr
  • Core II: Fine Arts/Humanities Category I, Production/Performance OR
  •  Core II: Fine Arts/Humanities Category II, Appreciation/Theory = 1-3cr
  • Core III: Social Sciences/History = 3cr
  • Core IV: Natural Sciences – Select either a Lecture/Lab course or a Non-Lab course = 3-4cr
  • Core VI: Multicultural/Global Perspective = 3cr
  • Electives = Select 2+cr

Second Year – Fall Semester – Total: 15+cr

  • Core III: Social Sciences/History = 3cr
  • Core V: Mathematics & Computer Applications = 3-4cr
  • Electives = Select 9+cr

Second Year – Spring Semester – Total: 15+cr

  • Electives or Additional Needed Core Courses = Select 15+cr

Associate of Arts
Curriculum Plans and General Education Core Requirements

Students must complete:

  • college general education core requirements consisting of 34 credit hours
  • a minimum of nine additional credits in AA disciplines for an Associate of Arts degree
  • minimum of 20 credits completed at DCC
  • 2.00 (C) grade point average
  • minimum of 60 total credits

The courses listed in each area are reflective of those most commonly required in preparation for transfer to another college or university. When selecting courses, students should consult the catalog of the school to which they intend to transfer.

Art (Visual Art) – Curriculum Plan AA (suggested)
The art curriculum at DCC prepares students for transfer to baccalaureate level institutions which offer terminal degrees in art and other areas of study. Those pursuing degrees in graphic design, fine arts, art education, and general education are encouraged to select, in consultation with their advisor, from the courses listed below. Students who wish to pursue art for personal enrichment are encouraged to participate in our program offerings. Art professionals are employed in a variety of occupational fields including, but not limited to the following: advertising, gallery and museum specialties, publishing, medical illustrators, set designers, interior design specialists, landscape designers, art therapists, art educators, and as fine artists.

Suggested Courses/Credits (some may satisfy General Education Core Requirements)

  • ARTH101 Foundations of Art 3cr
  • ARTH160 Global Visual Culture: Art Appreciation 3cr
  • ARTH200 Art of World Civilization I 3cr
  • ARTH201 Art of World Civilization II 3cr
  • ARTZ105 Visual Language – Drawing 3cr
  • ARTZ211 Drawing I – Figure 3cr
  • ARTZ212 Drawing Studio 3cr
  • ARTZ221 Painting I 3cr
  • ARTZ222 Painting Studio 3cr
  • ARTZ224 Watercolor I 3cr
  • ARTZ225 Watercolor Studio 3cr
  • GDSN250 Graphic Design I 3cr
  • HSTR101 Western Civilization I 3cr
  • HSTR102 Western Civilization II 3cr
  • LIT110 Intro to Lit 3cr
  • LSH101 Intro Humanities Contemporary 3cr
  • PHOT154 Exploring Digital Photography 3cr
  • PSYX100 Intro to Psychology 3cr
  • SOCI101 Intro to Sociology 3cr
  • SPNS101 Elementary Spanish I 4cr
  • SPNS102 Elementary Spanish II 4cr

Chemical Dependency Counseling – Curriculum Plan AA (mandatory and suggested)
Montana has a continuing need of entry-level Chemical Dependency Counselors who can become Licensed Addiction Counselors. Graduates from the program apply for internships and work for at least 2000 hours. The next step is to take the State Licensing Board written exam. A passing grade on the test qualifies the student for licensure as a LAC.

Completion of this curriculum indicates that the graduate has acquired the necessary skills for entry-level employment as an interning CD counselor.

Students who earn the designated Associate of Arts Degree in Chemical Dependency may also desire to transfer to a university to gain a Bachelor’s degree in Chemical Dependency studies and then pursue licensure.

Upon completion:

  • Goal I: Students will understand through application, the Clinical Assessment of addictions.
  • Students will administer, score, and interpret the results of screening and assessment instruments.
  • On the basis of screening and assessments, students will arrive at a clinical diagnosis.
  • Students will understand the importance of diagnosis and its role in the treatment process.
  • Goal II: Students will understand the basic principles of individual and group (including family) counseling for addictions.
  • Goal III: Students will explain at least two perspectives/theories explaining the origins of addictions.
  • Goal IV: Students will demonstrate an understanding of the pharmacology of drugs.

Mandatory Courses for the AA in Chemical Dependency

  • CAS210 Individual Counseling 4cr
  • CAS225 Group Counseling 4cr
  • CAS231 Pharmacology/Addictions 4cr
  • CAS260 Addiction Assessment/Documentation 4cr
  • CAS233 Chemical Dependency and Addiction Theory 4cr
  • CAS234 Family Counseling 4cr
  • CAS265 Multicultural Competence and Ethics 4cr
  • PSCI260 Intro to State and Local Government 3cr
  • PSYX100 Introduction to Psychology 3cr
  • SOCI101 Introduction to Sociology 3cr

Note: many of the courses are offered alternate years.
Students must also meet the other requirements for obtaining the Associate of Arts degree.

Suggested Courses/Credits (some may satisfy General Education Core Requirements)

  • BIOB160 Principles of Living Systems 3cr
  • BIOB161 Principles of Living Systems Lab 1cr
  • M095 Intermediate Algebra 3cr
  • PSYX211 Personality and Adjustment 3cr
  • PSYX230 Developmental Psychology 3cr
  • STAT216 Introduction to Statistics 4cr
  • Electives Core II, IV, VI 7cr

Communications – Curriculum Plan AA (suggested)
A communications curriculum provides an interested student with a sound base in a variety of perspectives including speaking, writing, business, and the humanities.

Suggested Courses/Credits (some may satisfy General Education Core Requirements)

  • BMGT215 Human Resource Management 3cr
  • COMX115 Intro to Interpersonal Communications 3cr
  • CRWR240 Intro to Creative Writing Workshop 3cr
  • LSH101 Intro Humanities Contemporary 3cr
  • LIT110 Intro to Lit 3cr
  • LIT285 Mythologies 3cr
  • PSYX100 Intro to Psychology 3cr
  • SIGN120 Sign Language 3cr
  • SOCI101 Intro to Sociology 3cr
  • SOCI241 Intro to Social Psychology 3cr
  • WRIT122 Intro to Business Writing 3cr
  • WRIT201 College Writing II 3cr
  • WRIT202 College Writing III 3cr
  • Core II and Core III courses

Education – Elementary – Curriculum Plan AA (suggested)
Elementary education prepares students to teach in elementary schools. Related areas are pre-K, kindergarten, special education, and middle school endorsement. Please work with your academic advisor and the catalog of the transfer institution to determine specific courses that should be taken.

Suggested Courses/Credits (some may satisfy General Education Core Requirements)

  • EDU200 Introduction to Education 2cr
  • EDEC108 Intro Early Childhood Education 3cr
  • EDU202 Early Field Experience 2cr (See Addendum)
  • EDU270 Instructional Technology 3cr
  • EDU231 Literature and Literacy for Children 3cr
  • EDSP204 Intro to Teaching Exceptional Learners 3cr
  • PSYX230 Developmental Psychology 3cr
  • PSYX272 Educational Psychology 3cr
  • CAS231 Pharmacology/Addictions 3cr
  • M121 College Algebra (or) 4cr
  • M130 Math for Elementary Teachers I 4cr
  • M131 Math for Elementary Teachers II 4cr
  • M145 Math for the Liberal Arts 3cr
  • NASX105 Intro Native American Studies 3cr
  • SIGN120 Simple Sign Language I 3cr
  • WRIT101 College Writing I 3cr
  • WRIT201 College Writing II 3cr

Fine Arts and Humanities
Choose courses in Art, English Literature, Humanities, and Music.

Social and Behavioral Sciences
Choose courses in Anthropology, History, Native American Studies, Political Science, Psychology, and Sociology.

Natural Sciences
Choose a physical science and a biological science.


Education – Secondary Education – Curriculum Plan AA (suggested)
The secondary education curriculum prepares students to work in high school settings. A middle school endorsement may be earned with additional and appropriate coursework. Please work with your academic advisor and the catalog of the transfer institution to determine specific courses that should be taken.

Suggested Courses/Credits (some may satisfy General Education Core Requirements)

  • ARTH101 Foundations of Art 3cr
  • ARTH160 Global Visual Culture: Art Appreciation 3cr
  • BIOB160 Principles of Living Systems 3cr
  • BIOB161 Principles of Living Systems Lab 1cr
  • BIOB170 Principles of Biological Diversity 3cr
  • BIOB171 Principles of Biological Diversity Lab 1cr
  • EDU200 Introduction to Education 2cr
  • EDU202 Early Field Experience 2cr (See Addendum)
  • EDU270 Instructional Technology 3cr
  • EDSP204 Intro to Teaching Exceptional Learners 3cr
  • PSYX272 Educational Psychology 3cr
  • HSTA101 American History I 3cr
  • HSTA102 American History II 3cr
  • CAS231 Pharmacology/Addictions 3cr
  • LIT110 Intro to Lit 3cr
  • MUSI101 Enjoyment of Music 3cr
  • MUSI103 Fundamentals of Musical Creation 3cr
  • PSYX100 Intro to Psychology 3cr
  • PSYX230 Developmental Psychology 3cr
  • SIGN120 Simple Sign Language I 3cr
  • WRIT201 College Writing II 3cr

In addition, courses should be taken that would fulfill areas of concentration, i.e. English, history, science, math, physical education, business, etc.


Education – Para-educator – Curriculum Plan AA
Para-educators (teacher aides/paraprofessionals) assist classroom teachers to educate children with special needs in PK-12 schools. Please work with your academic advisor and the catalog of the transfer institution to determine specific courses that should be taken.

Suggested Courses Credits (see advisor for suggested General Education Core Requirements)

  • COMX115 Intro to Interpersonal Communications 3cr
  • EDSP204 Intro to Teaching Exceptional Learners 3cr
  • EDEC105 Observation and Assessment 1cr
  • EDEC247 Child Growth and Development 3cr
  • EDEC248 Child Growth and Development Lab 1cr
  • EDEC108 Introduction to Early Childhood Education 2cr
  • EDU200 Introduction to Education 2cr
  • EDU202 Early Field Experience 2cr (See Addendum)
  • EDU270 Instructional Technology 3cr
  • EDU231 Literature and Literacy for Children 3cr
  • CAS231 Pharmacology/Addictions 3cr
  • PSYX272 Educational Psychology 3cr…
  • SIGN120 Sign Language 3cr

English – Curriculum Plan AA (suggested)
The curriculum provides students with a basic foundation in academic and practical writing with the options of exploring creative writing and the critical analysis of literature. Students with an English degree often pursue careers in law, professional writing, teaching, public relations, editing for the publishing industry, creating handbooks for the business world and writing news reports.

Suggested Courses/Credits (some may satisfy General Education Core Requirements)

  • EDU231 Literature and Literacy for Children 3cr
  • CRWR240 Intro to Creative Writing Workshop 3cr
  • LIT110 Intro to Lit 3cr
  • LIT210 American Lit I 3cr
  • LIT211 American Lit II 3cr
  • LIT223 British Lit I 3cr
  • LIT224 British Lit II 3cr
  • LIT285 Mythologies 3cr
  • LSH101 Intro Humanities Contemporary 3cr
  • SPNS100 Conversational Spanish 2cr
  • SPNS101 Elementary Spanish I 4cr
  • WRIT202 College Writing III 3cr

History – Curriculum Plan AA (suggested)
History majors usually pursue careers in education, public service, writing, or law. The following curriculum will help students prepare for the pursuit of a baccalaureate degree in History. Students should consult with their advisers before choosing courses in order to verify their transferability and applicability to the institution and program into which they expect to transfer.

Suggested Courses/Credits (some may satisfy General Education Core Requirements)

  • ANTY101 Anthropology and the Human Experience 3cr
  • ECNS201 Principles of Microeconomics 3cr
  • ECNS202 Principles of Macroeconomics 3cr
  • GPHY141 Geography of World Regions 3cr
  • HSTA101 American History I 3cr
  • HSTA102 American History II 3cr
  • HSTA111 American Civil Rights Movement 1cr
  • HSTA250 Plains Indian History 3cr
  • HSTA255 Montana History 3cr
  • HSTR101 Western Civilization I 3cr
  • HSTR102 Western Civilization II 3cr
  • LSH101 Intro Humanities Contemporary 3cr
  • NASX105 Introduction Native American Studies 3cr
  • PSCI201 Intro to American Government 3cr
  • PSCI260 Intro to State and Local Government 3cr
  • PSYX100 Intro to Psychology 3cr
  • SOCI101 Intro to Sociology 3cr
  • SPNS101 Elementary Spanish I 4cr
  • SPNS102 Elementary Spanish II 4cr

Music – Curriculum Plan AA (suggested)
Enrollment in the following courses will prepare the student for transfer to a baccalaureate level music program in music education, performance, business, therapy, technology, studio recording, or elementary education with a music option. Students should consult their advisor for a plan of study that meets their programmatic needs.

Suggested Courses/Credits (some may satisfy General Education Core Requirements)

  • EDU200 Introduction to Education 2cr
  • EDU202 Early Field Experience 2cr (See Addendum)
  • MUSI101 Enjoyment of Music 3cr
  • MUSI103 Fundamentals of Musical Creation 3cr
  • MUSI105 Music Theory I 3cr
  • MUSI106 Music Theory II 3cr
  • MUSI112 Choir :Dawson 1cr
  • MUSI114 Band: Dawson 1cr
  • MUSI115 Drumline I 1cr
  • MUSI140 Aural Perception I 2cr
  • MUSI141 Aural Perception II 2cr
  • MUSI195 Applied Music I 1cr
  • MUSI203 American Popular Music 3cr
  • MUSI205 Music Theory III 3cr
  • MUSI206 Music Theory IV 3cr
  • MUSI212 Choir II: Dawson 1cr
  • MUSI214 Band: Dawson 1cr
  • MUSI215 Drumline II 1cr
  • MUSI240 Aural Perception III 2cr
  • MUSI241 Aural Perception IV 2cr
  • MUSI295 Applied Music II 1cr
  • MUST118 MIDI Sequencing and Notation 3cr
  • MUST120 Introduction to Studio Recording 3cr
  • MUST215 Studio Recording 3cr
  • MUST299 Capstone Project 3cr
  • PSYX100 Intro to Psychology 3cr
  • PSYX272 Educational Psychology 3cr

Physical Education – Curriculum Plan AA (suggested)
A student majoring in physical education may pursue work as a K-12 teacher, a recreation director, fitness trainer, athletic coach, sports trainer, or in other related fields. When planning to transfer to a baccalaureate institution students should check specific requirements at the school of their choice and include selection of a minor area of study along with a physical education major. The student will be able to:

Suggested Courses/Credits (some may satisfy General Education Core Requirements)

  • BIOB160 Principles of Living Systems 3cr
  • BIOB161 Principles of Living Systems Lab 1cr
  • BIOB170 Principles of Biological Diversity 3cr
  • BIOB171 Principles of Biological Diversity Lab 1cr
  • BIOH201 Human Anatomy/Physiology I 3cr
  • BIOH202 Human Anatomy/Physiology I Lab 1cr
  • BIOH211 Human Anatomy/Physiology II 3cr
  • BIOH212 Human Anatomy/Physiology II Lab 1cr
  • CAS231 Pharmacology/Addictions 4cr
  • LSH101 Intro Humanities Contemporary 3cr
  • ACT159 Team/Individual Sports 2cr
  • HEE160 Basketball Techniques 2cr
  • AHAT210 Prevention and of Athletic Injuries 3cr
  • HEE220 Introduction to Physical Education 3cr
  • COA205 Introduction to Coaching 3cr
  • COA210 Sports Officiating 2cr
  • PSYX100 Intro to Psychology 3cr
  • PSYX230 Developmental Psychology 3cr
  • PSYX272 Educational Psychology 3cr
  • SOCI101 Intro to Sociology 3cr
  • Physical Ed Activity Courses

Political Science – Curriculum Plan AA (suggested)
Political Science is the study of politics, government, and public affairs. It provides the student with knowledge and understanding of the theory, organization, functions, and processes of domestic and international governance. Potential employment opportunities include campaign manager/assistant, policy analyst/public affairs specialist, community development specialist, public servant, social studies teacher, or pre-law.

Suggested Courses/Credits (some may satisfy General Education Core Requirements)

  • ARTH101 Foundations of Art 3cr
  • ARTZ105 Visual Language-Drawing 3cr
  • BIOB101 Discover Biology 3cr
  • BIOB102 Discover Biology Lab 1cr
  • BIOB160 Principles of Living Systems 3cr
  • BIOB161 Principles of Living Systems Lab 1cr
  • CAPP131 Basic MS Office 3cr
  • ECNS201 Principles of Microeconomics 3cr
  • ECNS202 Principles of Macroeconomics 3cr
  • ENSC105 Environmental Science 3cr
  • GPHY111 Intro Physical Geography 3cr
  • GPHY112 Intro Physical Geography Lab 1cr
  • GPHY141 Geography of World Regions 3cr
  • HSTA101 American History I 3cr
  • HSTA102 American History II 3cr
  • M121 College Algebra 4cr
  • M145 Math for the Liberal Arts 3cr
  • NASX105 Introduction to Native American Studies 3cr
  • PHL101 Intro to Philosophy 3cr
  • PHL110 Ethics 3cr
  • PSCI210 Intro to American Government 3cr
  • PSCI260 Intro to State and Local Government 3cr
  • PSYX100 Intro to Psychology 3cr
  • SOCI101 Intro to Sociology 3cr
  • SOCI201 Social Problems 3cr
  • SPNS101 Elementary Spanish I 4cr
  • SPNS102 Elementary Spanish II 4cr
  • STAT216 Introduction Statistics 4cr

Psychology – Curriculum Plan AA (suggested)
The curriculum focuses on understanding individual behavior – relationships among the physical world (biology and behavior), thought, emotion, memory, and spirit. Psychology majors may pursue many potential avenues of study and employment, including: counseling (mental health, school, and addiction), or specialties in psychology such as physiological, cognitive, and behavioral.

Suggested Courses/Credits (some may satisfy General Education Core Requirements)

  • BIOB160 Principles of Living Systems 3cr
  • BIOB161 Principles of Living Systems Laboratory 1cr
  • CAS231 Pharmacology/Addictions 4cr
  • M121 College Algebra 4cr
  • PSYX100 Introduction to Psychology 3cr
  • PSYX211 Personality and Adjustment 3cr
  • PSYX230 Developmental Psychology 3cr
  • PSYX272 Educational Psychology 3cr
  • SOCI101 Introduction to Sociology 3cr
  • SOCI160 Intro to Juvenile Delinquency 3cr
  • SOCI201 Social Problems 3cr
  • SOCI206 Deviant Behavior 3cr
  • SOCI215 Intro to Sociology of the Family 3cr
  • SOCI246 Intro to Rural Sociology 3cr
  • STAT216 Introduction to Statistics 4cr

Sociology – Curriculum Plan AA (suggested)
Sociology is the study of human behavior in groups. Human interaction is examined within the context of cultures, social structures, social institutions, and the socialization process. The self and social roles integrate individuals into the fabric of society. Individuals with a sociology background can find employment in nearly all walks of life, including business, agricultural organizations, labor relations, industrial research, market analysis, and academic institutions. Many graduates in sociology find their way into the fields of social work and criminal justice.

Suggested Courses/Credits (some may satisfy General Education Core Requirements)

  • ANTY101 Anthropology and the Human Experience 3cr
  • ARTH101 Foundations of Art 3cr
  • BIOB101 Discover Biology 3cr
  • BIOB102 Discover Biology Lab 1cr
  • BIOB160 Principles of Living Systems 3cr
  • BIOB161 Principles of Living Systems Lab 1cr
  • CAPP131 Basic MS Office 3cr
  • CJUS121 Introduction to Criminal Justice 3cr
  • GPHY111 Intro Physical Geography 3cr
  • GPHY112 Intro Physical Geography Lab 1cr
  • GPHY141 Geography of World Regions 3cr
  • ENSC105 Environmental Science 3cr
  • M121 College Algebra 4cr
  • M145 Math for the Liberal Arts 3cr
  • NASX105 Introduction to Native American Studies 3cr
  • PHL101 Intro to Philosophy 3cr
  • PHL110 Ethics 3cr
  • PSCI210 Intro to American Government 3cr
  • PSYX100 Intro to Psychology 3cr
  • SOCI101 Intro to Sociology 3cr
  • SOCI201 Social Problems 3cr
  • SOCI206 Deviant Behavior 3cr
  • SOCI211 Intro to Criminology 3cr
  • SOCI215 Intro to Sociology of the Family 3cr
  • SOCI236 Intro to Race and Ethnic Relations 3cr
  • SOCI241 Intro to Social Psychology 3cr
  • SOCI246 Intro to Rural Sociology 3cr
  • SOCI260 Intro to Juvenile Delinquency 3cr
  • STAT216 Introduction to Statistics 4cr

Associate of Science
Areas of Concentration

An AS designated degree will require a concentration of nine (9) credits beyond the General Education Core requirements from:

  • Accounting
  • Agriculture
  • Biology
  • Business
  • Computer Science
  • Chemistry
  • Criminal Justice
  • Geology
  • Health
  • Mathematics
  • Physics
  • Science 

Note: if placement test scores indicate below 100 level courses are necessary adjustments would need to be made when selecting courses

Associate of Science
Plan of Study

First Year – Fall Semester – Total: 15+cr

  • Core I: Communications, WRIT101 College Writing I = 3cr
  • Core II: Fine Arts/Humanities, Category I Production/Performance OR
  • Core II: Fine Arts/Humanities, Category II Appreciation/Theory = 1-3cr
  • Core IV: Natural Sciences, Select a Lecture/Lab course = 4cr
  • Core V: Mathematics & Computer Applications, CAPP131 Basic MS Office = 3cr
  • Electives = Select 4+cr

First Year – Spring Semester – Total: 15+cr

  • Core I: Communications, COMX111 Intro to Public Speaking = 3cr
  • Core II: Fine Arts/Humanities, Category I Production/Performance OR
  • Core II: Fine Arts/Humanities, Category II Appreciation/Theory = 1-3cr
  • Core III: Social Sciences/History = 3cr
  • Core IV: Natural Sciences – Select a Lecture/Lab course or Non-Lab course = 3-4cr
  • Core VI: Multicultural/Global Perspective = 3cr
  • Electives = Select 2+cr

Second Year – Fall Semester – Total: 15+cr

  • Core III: Social Sciences/History = 3cr
  • Core V: Mathematics & Computer Applications = 3-4cr
  • Electives = Select 9+cr

Second Year – Spring Semester – Total: 15+cr

  • Electives or Additional Needed Core Courses = Select 15+cr

Note: the above serves as an example of a plan of study for the A.S. degree – order and selection of core courses will vary depending on advisor suggestions. 

Associate of Science
Curriculum Plans and General Education Core Requirements

Students must complete the college general education core requirements consisting of 34 credit hours and a minimum of nine additional credits in AS disciplines for an Associate of Science degree and

  • minimum of 20 credits completed at DCC
  • 2.00 (C) grade point average
  • minimum of 60 total credits

The courses listed in each area are reflective of those most commonly required in preparation for transfer to another college or university. When selecting courses, students should consult the catalog of the school to which they intend to transfer.

Accounting – Curriculum Plan AS (suggested)
Accounting remains an essential priority for all types of organizations since it provides the information required for informed financial decisions and planning. Students who are interested in an accounting degree should complete the following courses in order to be prepared to transfer into an accounting program at a senior institution. The suggested courses will help students improve their skills for processing information, analytical thinking, interpersonal relations and communications. Career possibilities could include accountant, financial analyst or planner, stock analyst or broker, bank officer or auditor.

Suggested Courses/Credits (some may satisfy General Education Core Requirements)

  • ACTG201 Principles of Financial Accounting I 3cr
  • ACTG202 Principles of Managerial Accounting 3cr
  • BGEN105 Introduction to Business 3cr
  • BGEN235 Business Law I 3cr
  • CAPP136 Basic MS Excel 3cr
  • ECNS201 Principles of Microeconomics 3cr
  • ECNS202 Principles of Macroeconomics 3cr
  • M121 College Algebra 4cr or Placement test for M171 Calculus I 5cr
  • PSYX100 Intro to Psychology 3cr
  • SOCI101 Introduction to Sociology 3cr
  • STAT216 Introduction to Statistics 4cr
  • WRIT122 Intro to Business Writing 3cr

Agriculture – Curriculum Plan AS (suggested)
Students who are interested in an agriculture transfer program should complete the following courses in order to be prepared to transfer into an agriculture-related program at a baccalaureate institution. Such programs may focus on animal science, crop and soil science, agricultural mechanics, agricultural economics, or agribusiness management.

Suggested Courses/Credits (some may satisfy General Education Core Requirements)

  • ACTG201 Principles of Financial Accounting 3cr
  • AGBE210 Economics of Agricultural Business 3cr
  • AGED105 Microcomputers in Agriculture 3cr
  • AGED140 Leadership Development in Agriculture 3cr
  • ANSC100 Introduction to Animal Science 3cr
  • ANSC202 Livestock Feeding and Nutrition 4cr
  • ANSC265 A & P of Domestic Animals 3cr
  • ANSC266 A & P of Domestic Animals Lab 1cr
  • BIOO110 Plant Science 3cr
  • BIOB160 Principles of Living Systems 3cr
  • BIOB161 Principles of Living Systems Lab 1cr
  • CHMY121 Intro to General Chemistry 3cr
  • CHMY122 Intro to General Chemistry Lab 1cr
  • ECNS201 Principles of Microeconomics 3cr
  • ECNS202 Principles of Macroeconomics 3cr
  • M121 College Algebra 4cr
  • M145 Math for the Liberal Arts 3cr
  • NRSM101 Natural Resource Conservation 3cr
  • NRSM102 Natural Resource Conservation Lab 1cr
  • SOCI101 Introduction to Sociology 3cr
  • STAT216 Introduction to Statistics 4cr

Allied Health/Nursing – Curriculum Plan AS (suggested)
Completion of the following courses will prepare the student for transfer into a medical science program. This program could be at a four-year school or a technical school that provides training in a specific medical field. Career options include, but are not limited to, the following: Nursing, Respiratory Therapy, X-Ray Technology, Dental Hygiene, Laboratory Assistant, and Physical Therapy. DCC has an articulation agreement in Nursing with Montana Tech of the University of Montana, Butte.

Suggested Courses/Credits (some may satisfy General Education Core Requirements)

  • BIOH201 Human Anatomy/Physiology I 3cr
  • BIOH202 Human Anatomy/Physiology I Lab 1cr
  • BIOH211 Human Anatomy/Physiology II 3cr
  • BIOH212 Human Anatomy/Physiology II Lab 1cr
  • BIOM250 Microbiology for Health Sciences 3cr
  • BIOM251 Microbiology for Health Sciences Lab 1cr
  • CHMY121 Intro to General Chemistry 3cr
  • CHMY122 Intro to General Chemistry Lab 1cr
  • CHMY123 Intro to Organic and Biochemistry 3cr
  • CHMY124 Intro to Organic and Biochemistry Lab 1cr
  • M121 College Algebra 4cr
  • PHL110 Introduction to Ethics 3cr
  • PSYX100 Intro to Psychology 3cr
  • PSYX230 Developmental Psychology 3cr
  • STAT216 Introduction to Statistics 4cr
  • WRIT201 Composition II 3cr

Biology – Curriculum Plan AS (suggested)
Completion of the following courses will prepare the student for transfer into a biology program at a baccalaureate institution. The biology career options that are available include, but are not limited to, the following: Biology, Biology Teaching, Biomedical Science, Fish and Wildlife Management, Ecology, and Environmental Science. If the student intends to complete a bachelor’s degree in biology education (for high school teaching) he/she would be advised to take secondary education courses as well (see Education, Secondary in this section). Students planning on entering a program in pre-medicine, pre-optometry, or pre-dental could also benefit from the curriculum.

Suggested Courses Credits (some may satisfy General Education Core Requirements)

  • BIOB160 Principles of Living Systems 3cr
  • BIOB161 Principles of Living Systems Lab 1cr
  • BIOB170 Principles of Biological Diversity 3cr
  • BIOB171 Principles of Biological Diversity Lab 1cr
  • BIOM250 Microbiology for Health Sciences 3cr
  • BIOM251 Microbiology for Health Sciences Lab 1cr
  • CHMY141 College Chemistry I 4cr
  • CHMY142 College Chemistry I Lab 1cr
  • CHMY143 College Chemistry II 4cr
  • CHMY144 College Chemistry II Lab 1cr
  • COMX111 Intro to Public Speaking 3cr
  • M121 College Algebra 4cr or
  • M151 Precalculus 4cr
  • STAT216 Introduction to Statistics 4cr
  • WRIT201 College Writing II 3cr

Business Administration – Curriculum Plan AS (suggested)
The Business Administration transfer curriculum will provide students with the educational background to be successful in a business program at a senior institution. Courses in Business Administration are designed to meet the requirements of students who plan to enter their junior (third) year of college upon completion. The program emphasizes both general education core and elective coursework.

Suggested Courses/Credits (some may satisfy General Education Core Requirements)

  • ACTG201 Principles of Financial Accounting 3cr
  • ACTG202 Principles of Managerial Accounting 3cr
  • BGEN105 Introduction to Business 3cr
  • BGEN235 Business Law I 3cr
  • BMGT237 Human Relations in Business 3cr
  • CAPP131 Basic MS Office 3cr
  • CAPP136 Basic MS Excel 3cr
  • ECNS201 Principles of Microeconomics 3cr
  • ECNS202 Principles of Macroeconomics 3cr
  • M121 College Algebra 4cr or Placement test for M171 Calculus I 5cr
  • PSYX100 Intro to Psychology 3cr
  • SOCI101 Intro to Sociology 3cr
  • STAT216 Introduction to Statistics 4cr
  • WRIT122 Intro to Business Writing 3cr

Chemistry – Curriculum Plan AS (suggested)
A student planning to complete a bachelor’s degree in chemistry at a senior institution would be advised to take the following courses. If the student intends to complete a bachelor’s degree in chemistry education (for high school teaching) he/she would be advised to take secondary education courses as well (see Education, Secondary in this section).

Suggested Courses/Credits (some may satisfy General Education Core Requirements)

  • CHMY141 College Chemistry I 4cr
  • CHMY142 College Chemistry Laboratory I 1cr
  • CHMY143 College Chemistry II 4cr
  • CHMY144 College Chemistry Laboratory II 1cr
  • M151 Precalculus 4cr
  • M171 Calculus I 5cr
  • M172 Calculus II 5cr
  • PHSX220 Physics I 3cr
  • PHSX221 Physics I Lab 1cr
  • PHSX222 Physics II 3cr
  • PHSX223 Physics II Lab 1cr
  • STAT216 Introduction to Statistics 4cr

Criminal Justice – Curriculum Plan AA (suggested)
Students who complete a criminal justice curriculum are prepared for work in law enforcement, probation and corrections, and in other positions in the field of criminal justice. There will always be need for law enforcement and criminal justice professionals. A criminal justice degree is also excellent preparation for further study in criminal justice, sociology, law, or in other human services disciplines.

Suggested Courses/Credits (some may satisfy General Education Core Requirements)

  • ARTH101 Foundations of Art 3cr
  • ARTZ105 Visual Language – Drawing 3cr
  • ARTZ211 Drawing I 3cr
  • BIOB101 Discover Biology 3cr
  • BIOB102 Discover Biology Lab 1cr
  • BIOB160 Principles of Living Systems 3cr
  • BIOB161 Principles of Living Systems Lab 1cr
  • CAPP131 Basic MS Office 3cr
  • CHMY121 Intro General Chemistry 3cr
  • CHMY122 Intro General Chemistry Lab 1cr
  • CJUS121 Introduction to Criminal Justice 3cr
  • CJUS200 Principles of Criminal Law 3cr
  • CJUS231 Criminal Evidence and Procedure 3cr
  • CJUS220 Introduction to Corrections 3cr
  • CJUS208 CJ Ethics and Leadership 3cr
  • ENSC105 Environmental Science 3cr
  • M121 College Algebra 4cr
  • M145 Math for the Liberal Arts 3cr
  • NASX105 Intro Native American Studies 3cr
  • PHL101 Intro to Philosophy 3cr
  • PHL110 Ethics 3cr
  • PSCI210 Intro to American Government 3cr
  • PSCI260 Intro to State and Local Government 3cr
  • PSYX100 Intro to Psychology 3cr
  • SOCI101 Intro to Sociology 3cr
  • SOCI201 Social Problems 3cr
  • SOCI206 Deviant Behavior 3cr
  • SOCI211 Intro to Criminology 3cr
  • SOCI236 Intro to Race and Ethnic Relations 3cr
  • SOCI260 Intro to Juvenile Delinquency 3cr
  • SPNS101 Elementary Spanish I 4cr
  • SPNS102 Elementary Spanish II 4cr
  • STAT216 Introduction Statistics 4cr

Engineering – Curriculum Plan AS (suggested)
The courses in this area of emphasis will help prepare a student to transfer to a university that trains engineers. University programs of this nature require high concentrations of math and science courses. Check carefully with the university to assure maximum transferability. DCC has an articulation agreement in Engineering with Montana Tech of the University of Montana, Butte.

Suggested Courses/Credits (some may satisfy General Education Core Requirements)

  • CHMY141 College Chemistry I 4cr
  • CHMY142 College Chemistry Lab I 1cr
  • CHMY143 College Chemistry II 4cr
  • CHMY144 College Chemistry Lab II 1cr
  • DDSN113 Technical Drafting 3cr
  • DDSN114 Introduction to CAD 3cr
  • ECNS201 Principles of Microeconomics (or) 3cr
  • ECNS202 Principles of Macroeconomics 3cr
  • EGEN101 Intro to Engineering Calculations and Design 3cr
  • EGEN201Engineering Mechanics: Statics 3cr
  • EGEN202 Engineering Mechanics: Dynamics 3cr
  • M171 Calculus I 5cr
  • M172 Calculus II 5cr
  • M273 Multivariable Calculus 5cr
  • PHSX220 Physics I 3cr
  • PHSX221 Physics I Lab 1cr
  • PHSX222 Physics II 3cr
  • PHSX223 Physics II Lab 1cr

Fish and Game Warden – Curriculum Plan AS (suggested)
A student intending on completing a degree in Fish and Game Warden at a transfer institution would be advised to take the following courses.

Suggested Courses/Credits (some may satisfy General Education Core Requirements)

  • ARTH101 Foundations of Art 3cr
  • BIOB160 Principles of Living Systems 3cr
  • BIOB161 Principles of Living Systems Lab 1cr
  • BIOB170 Principles of Biological Diversity 3cr
  • BIOB171 Principles of Biological Diversity Lab 1cr
  • CAPP131 Basic MS Office 3cr
  • CHMY141 College Chemistry I 4cr
  • CHMY142 College Chemistry I Lab 1cr
  • CHMY143 College Chemistry II 4cr
  • CHMY144 College Chemistry II Lab 1cr
  • CJUS121 Intro to Criminal Justice 3cr
  • COMX111 Intro to Public Speaking 3cr
  • ENSC105 Intro Environmental Science 3cr
  • GPHY111 Intro Physical Geography 3cr
  • GPHY112 Intro Physical Geography Lab 1cr
  • M121 College Algebra 4cr
  • M145 Math for the Liberal Arts 3cr
  • NASX105 Intro to Native American Studies 3cr
  • PHL110 Ethics 3cr
  • PSCI210 Intro to American Government 3cr
  • PSCI260 Intro State and Local Government 3cr
  • PSYX100 Intro to Psychology 3cr
  • SOCI101 Intro to Sociology 3cr
  • SPNS101 Elementary Spanish I 4cr
  • SPNS102 Elementary Spanish II 4cr
  • STAT216 Introduction to Statistics 4cr
  • WRIT201 College Writing II 3cr

Fish and Wildlife Management – Curriculum Plan AS (suggested)
Students with a bachelor’s degree in Fish/Wildlife Management are qualified for entry-level positions in natural resource management fields. Students should be advised that most professional level jobs in this field require a master’s degree in Biology, Ecology, or related field. A student intending on completing a degree in Fish/Wildlife Management at a transfer institution would be advised to take the following courses.

Suggested Courses/Credits (some may satisfy General Education Core Requirements)

  • BIOB160 Principles of Living Systems 3cr
  • BIOB161 Principles of Living Systems Lab 1cr
  • BIOB170 Principles of Biological Diversity 3cr
  • BIOB171 Principles of Biological Diversity Lab 1cr
  • BIOO105 Introduction to Botany 3cr
  • BIOO106 Introduction to Botany Lab 1cr
  • CHMY121 Intro to General Chemistry 3cr
  • CHMY122 Intro to General Chemistry Lab 1cr
  • CHMY123 Intro to Organic and Biochemistry 3cr
  • CHMY124 Intro to Organic and Biochemistry Lab 1cr (must take full year: CHMY121 and CHMY123 Labs CHMY122 and CHMY124)
  • COMX111 Intro to Public Speaking 3cr
  • ECNS201 Principles of Microeconomics 3cr
  • M171 Calculus I 5cr
  • STAT216 Introduction to Statistics 4cr
  • WRIT201 College Writing II 3cr

Geology/Environmental Science – Curriculum Plan AS (suggested)
The courses in this area will help prepare a student to transfer to a university to complete a bachelor’s degree in geology, earth science, or environmental science. If the student intends to complete a bachelor’s degree in education, he/she would be advised to take secondary education courses as well (see Education, Secondary in this section).

Suggested Courses/Credits (some may satisfy General Education Core Requirements)

  • CHMY141 College Chemistry I 4cr
  • CHMY142 College Chemistry Lab I 1cr
  • CHMY143 College Chemistry II 4cr
  • CHMY144 College Chemistry Lab II 1cr
  • GEO101 Intro to Physical Geology 3cr
  • GEO102 Intro to Physical Geology Lab 1cr
  • GEO211 Earth History and Evolution 3cr
  • GEO212 Earth History and Evolution Lab 1
  • GPHY111 Intro to Physical Geography 3
  • GPHY112 Intro to Physical Geography Lab 1cr
  • M151 Precalculus 4cr
  • STAT216 Introduction to Statistics 4cr

Environmental Science majors should also take

  • BIOB160 Principles of Living Systems 3cr
  • BIOB161 Principles of Living Systems Lab 1cr
  • ENSC105 Environmental Science 3cr

Mathematics – Curriculum Plan AS (suggested)
The Associate of Science degree with emphasis in mathematics prepares students to transfer to a university for a major in mathematics, statistics, applied mathematics, or mathematics education. Statistics trains students in analysis of data. Employment is often found in insurance companies, research, and government. Applied mathematics emphasizes applications and computer programming and prepares students to find employment in business, industry and government. Mathematics education prepares students to teach at the secondary level.

Suggested Courses/Credits (some may satisfy General Education Core Requirements)

  • M171 Calculus I 5cr
  • M172 Calculus II 5cr
  • M273 Multivariable Calculus 5cr
  • PHSX220 Physics I 3cr
  • PHSX221 Physics I Lab 1cr
  • PHSX222 Physics II 3cr
  • PHSX223 Physics II Lab 1cr
  • STAT216 Introduction to Statistics 4cr
    (depending on Math background, M90, M95, MA121, M151 may be required)

A graduate with a bachelor’s degree in Occupational Safety and Health may work for a wide variety of employers in both private industry and government, wherever workplace safety is a concern. Employment opportunities exist in mining, manufacturing, petroleum extraction, government, insurance, and consulting firms. A student interested in a career in Occupational Safety and Health would take the following courses at Dawson Community College with the intention of transferring to a four-year institution offering the bachelor’s degree.

Suggested Courses/Credits (some may satisfy General Education Core Requirements)

  • BIOB160 Principles of Living Systems 3cr
  • BIOB161 Principles of Living Systems 1cr
  • CAPP121 Basic MS Office 3cr
  • CHMY141 College Chemistry I 4cr
  • CHMY142 College Chemistry Lab I 1cr
  • CHMY143 College Chemistry II 4cr
  • CHMY144 College Chemistry Lab II 1cr
  • COMX111 Intro to Interpersonal Communications 3cr
  • M121 College Algebra 4cr
  • M151 Precalculus 4cr
  • M171 Calculus I 5cr
  • PHSX220 Physics I (w/Calculus) 3cr
  • PHSX221 Physics I Lab 1cr
  • PSYX100 Intro to Psychology 3cr
  • STAT216 Introduction to Statistics 4cr

Pharmacy – Curriculum Plan AS (suggested)
A student intending to apply to a pharmacy program at a transfer institution would be advised to take the following courses. These courses are considered to be pre-pharmacy, and, along with pre-pharmacy courses at the transfer institution, qualify the student to apply to a pharmacy degree program.

Suggested Courses/Credits (some may satisfy General Education Core Requirements)

  • BIOH201 Human Anatomy/Physiology I 3cr
  • BIOH202 Human Anatomy/Physiology I Lab 1cr
  • BIOH211 Human Anatomy/Physiology II 3cr
  • BIOH212 Human Anatomy/Physiology II Lab 1cr
  • CHMY141 College Chemistry I 4cr
  • CHMY142 College Chemistry Lab I 1cr
  • CHMY143 College Chemistry II 4cr
  • CHMY144 College Chemistry Lab II 1cr
  • COMX111 Intro to Public Speaking 3cr
  • ECNS201 Principles of Microeconomics (or) 3cr
  • ECNS202 Principles of Macroeconomics 3cr
  • M171 Calculus I 5cr
  • PHSX220 Physics I (w/Calculus) 3cr
  • PHSX221 Physics I Lab 1cr
  • PHSX222 Physics II 3cr
  • PHSX223 Physics II Lab 1cr
  • PSYX100 Intro to Psychology (or) 3cr
  • SOCI101 Intro to Sociology (or) 3cr
  • SOCI201 Social Problems 3cr
  • STAT216 Introduction to Statistics 4cr
  • WRIT101 College Writing I 3cr

Physics – Curriculum Plan AS (suggested)
The following courses comprise the basics for a student intending to complete a baccalaureate degree in physics at a university. A degree in physics could lead to a research career or other science-oriented careers that require a physics background. A student planning to teach physics at the high school level would be encouraged to take secondary education coursework (see Education-Secondary Education) as well.

Suggested Courses/Credits (some may satisfy General Education Core Requirements)

  • CHMY141 College Chemistry I 4cr
  • CHMY142 College Chemistry Lab I 1cr
  • CHMY143 College Chemistry II 4cr
  • CHMY144 College Chemistry Lab II 1cr
  • M171 Calculus I 5cr
  • M172 Calculus II 5cr
  • M273 Multivariable Calculus 5cr
  • PHSX220 Physics I 3cr
  • PHSX221 Physics I Lab 1cr
  • PHSX222 Physics II 3cr
  • PHSX223 Physics II Lab 1cr

Associate of Applied Science (A.A.S.)

General Information
Minimum Competency Standards for Program Admission

Research indicates that students who participate in, and apply the results of basic skills assessment in a program of study, have a much higher rate of academic success than those who do not follow or utilize such advice. Therefore, Dawson Community College uses the results of a basic skills assessment test to direct students into appropriate English, reading, and mathematics course(s) and to advise students in the selection of other courses.

Exceptions which preclude the necessity for the basic skills assessment and placement include documentation of one or all of the following criteria: if a student has a college degree or acceptable ACT or SAT test scores, the assessment test is not required; an exemption is granted if the student has an ACT composite of 22 or an SAT score of 468 in math and 425 in English.

The Associate of Applied Science (A.A.S.) degrees are awarded in specific career occupational fields. Course requirements for earning A.A.S. degrees are very specific and students seeking these degrees should follow the outlined programs exactly and see their advisor each semester.

A.A.S. Degree Requirements

  • Completion of the coursework that is outlined in the Plan of Study
  • Successful completion of at least 60 credit hours in courses numbered 100 or above
  • Earning a minimum 2.00 cumulative grade point average from DCC
  • Successful completion of a minimum of 20 credits completed at DCC
  • Successful completion of CAPP131 Basic MS Office and WRIT101 College Writing I or equivalent
  • Course in Computation
    • Math courses 100
  • Course in Communications
    • Intro to Public Speaking
    • College Writing
    • Interpersonal Communications
  • Course in Human Relations
    • Human Relations in Business
    • Intro to Sociology
    • Intro to Psychology

The following career-technical curricula are designed to prepare the student for immediate employment upon completion of a specific program:

  • Agribusiness Technology
  • Agribusiness Technology-Equitation Option
  • Business Management
  • Corrosion Technology
  • Criminal Justice
  • Criminal Justice Law Enforcement-Peace Officer Option
  • Criminal Justice Law Enforcement-Private Security Option
  • Early Childhood Education
  • Music Technology
  • Welding Technology

All courses or programs are subject to scheduling changes or cancellations. Every effort to inform students in advance of such changes and/or cancellations will be made.

A.A.S. Agribusiness Technology
The Agribusiness Technology program at Dawson Community College prepares students for successful careers and a lifetime of informed choices in the global agriculture, food, fiber, and natural resources industries. Students develop entry-level knowledge, skills, aptitudes and experiences in agricultural business, science and production. This includes careers in supplies, sales, services, product processing, and natural resources.

  • Students will build a strong knowledge base in the field of Agriculture and practical skilled-based exposure in its related industries (Animal Sciences, Range and Soil Sciences, Business and Marketing)
  • The course of study in Agribusiness Technology will give the student the opportunity to demonstrate knowledge, skills, attitudes, and practical experiences for entry-level employment or self-employment in the agricultural industry segments.
  • Serve those students seeking a career in Agriculture and/or planning to pursue an education beyond the associate’s level.
  • Expose students to courses in computation, communications, and human relations, and will assist students in developing an understanding and appreciation for diversity, social responsibility and the participation in public affairs.
  • Provide students with opportunities for practical experience in the Agriculture system via internships, fieldwork, and skills-based course offerings.
  • Assist students in the development of critical thinking and problem-solving skills, and the ability to conceptualize ideas.

Plan of Study: A.A.S. Agribusiness Technology

Freshman Year – Fall Semester – Total: 14cr

  • ANSC100 Introduction to Animal Science 3cr
  • BIOB101 Discover Biology 3cr and BIOB102 Discover Biology Lab 1cr OR
  • BIOB160 Principles of Living Systems 3cr and BIOB161 Principles of Living Systems Lab 1cr 
  • NRSM101 Natural Resource Conservation 3cr
  • NRSM102 Montana Range Plants Lab 1cr
  • WRIT101 College Writing I 3cr (Communications)

Freshman Year – Spring Semester – Total: 14cr

  • ANSC202 Livestock Feeding and Nutrition 4cr
  • ANSC265 A and P of Domestic Animals 3cr
  • ANSC266 A and P of Domestice Animals Lab 1cr
  • COMX111 Intro to Public Speaking 3cr
  • BIOB110 Plant Science 3cr

Sophomore Year – Fall Semester – Total: 17cr

  • ACTG101 Accounting Procedures I 3cr OR
  • ACTG201 Principles of Financial Accounting 3cr
  • AGBE210 Economics of Agricultural Business 3cr
  • ANSC262 Range Livestock Production 3cr
  • XXXxxx Animal Reproduction 4cr
  • AGED105 Microcomputers in Agriculture* 3cr
  • ECP100 Standard First Aid and CPR 1cr
  • M108 Business or other approved Math 3cr (Computation)

Sophomore Year – Spring Semester – Total: 15-16cr

  • ABE278 Agri-Business Planning 3cr
  • CAPP131 Basic MS Office 3cr
  • ENSC209 Environmental Science 3cr OR
  • CHMY121 Intro General Chemistry 3cr & CHMY122 Intro General Chemistry Lab 1cr
  • SOCI101 Intro to Sociology 3cr OR
  • PSYX100 Intro to Psychology 3cr
  • BMGT237 Human Relations in Business 3cr (Human Relations)
  • PSCI206 Intro to State and Local Government 3cr

Minimum of:

  • 60 credits required for graduation
  • three AG professional electives recommended
  • Work Experience/Internship is Strongly Recommended

A.A.S. Agribusiness Technology: Equitation Option
The equitation option is provided for students who have an interest in working in general agriculture and first and foremost the horse industry. The equine industry is growing and ever changing. The A.A.S. degree is intended to provide basic, practical, and theoretical grounds from which they can choose a field in the industry. Students work with young horses to acquire knowledge and skills in horsemanship, training, safe horse handling, and husbandry. Furthermore, a background in general agriculture is added to make for a very well rounded individual in knowledge that is important in livestock, feeds, range condition, business and marketing. The program is also designed for students who plan to pursue an advanced university degree in the field.

Upon completion of the program:

  • Students will build a strong knowledge base in the field of Agriculture/Equine Science and practical skilled-based exposure in its related industries (Animal Sciences, Equine Sciences, Range and Soil Sciences, Business and Marketing).
  • The course of study in Agribusiness Technology: Equitation Option will give the student the opportunity to demonstrate knowledge, skills, attitudes, and practical experiences for entry-level employment or self-employment in the equine and agricultural industry segments.
  • Serve those students seeking a career in Equine Studies and Agriculture and/or planning to pursue an education beyond the associate’s level.
  • Expose students to courses in computation, communications, and human relations, and will assist students in developing an understanding and appreciation for diversity, social responsibility and the participation in public affairs.
  • Provide students with opportunities for practical experience in the Agriculture/Equine Industry via internships, fieldwork, and skills-based course offerings.
  • Assist students in the development of critical thinking and problem-solving skills, and the ability to conceptualize ideas.
  • Serve those students seeking a career as an Equine Professional by providing in-depth and practical skills-based exposure to the equine training and sciences component of Agriculture.

Plan of Study: A.A.S. Agribusiness Technology: Equitation Option

Freshman Year – Fall Semester – Total: 16cr

  • NRSM101 Natural Resource Conservation 3cr
  • NRSM102 Montana Range Plants 1cr
  • ANSC100 Introduction to Animal Science 3cr
  • EQUH110 Western Equitation 3cr
  • AGBE278 Agri-Business Planning* 3cr
  • AGED105 Microcomputers in Agriculture* 3cr

Freshman Year – Spring Semester – Total: 17-18cr

  • ANSC262 Range Livestock Production* 3cr
  • EQUH210 Intermediate Western Equitation 3cr
  • ANSC202 Livestock Feeding and Nutrition 4cr
  • M108 Business Math or Higher 3/4cr (Computation)
  • CAPP131 Basic MS Office 3cr

Sophomore Year – Fall Semester – Total: 15cr

  • EQUS150 Equine Production* 3cr
  • ACTG201 Principles Financial Accounting or ACTG101 Accounting Procedures I 3cr
  • AGBE210 Economics of Agricultural Business 3cr
  • EQUH253 Starting Colts 2cr
  • BIOB160 Principles of Living Systems and BIOB161 Principles of Living Systems Lab 1cr OR
  • BIOB101 Discover Biology 3cr and BIOB102 Discover Biology Lab 1cr
  • AGED140 Leadership Development in Ag*

Sophomore Year – Spring Semester – Total: 18cr

  • ANSC265 A and P of Domestic Animals 3cr
  • ANSC266 A and P of Domestic Animals Lab 1cr
  • BIOB110 Plant Science* 3cr
  • EQUH256 Developing the Young Horse 2cr
  • CAPP131 Basic MS Office 3cr 
  • SOCI101 Introduction to Sociology OR
  • PSYX100 Introduction to Psychology 3cr (Human Relations)
  • WRIT101 College Writing I 3cr (Communications)

Minimum of:
65 credits required for graduation
*Denotes courses offered every other year – students must take all courses listed


A.A.S. Business Management
The Business Management program prepares students for entry-level positions in business enterprises. Students will receive a solid grounding in accounting, computers, personnel management, marketing and business management. This program will provide students with an understanding of the business environment through both theoretical analysis and practical application of the principles of business management, making them a more valued employee. The program supports both the goals of employment and academic transfer, should the student wish to continue his/her education.

Upon successful completion of this plan of study, students will be able to:

  • Prepare, read and understand a company’s financial statements.
  • Compose written and oral messages in a clear, concise, and complete manner.
  • Operate computerized systems that are essential to small business success.
  • Apply human relation theories to improve workplace efficiency within the legal environment.
  • Define, price, distribute, and promote a company’s product within a target market.
  • Solve common mathematical and statistical problems that are faced in business.
  • Understand the economic, socio-cultural, and regulatory business environments.

Plan of Study: A.A.S. Business Management

Freshman Year – Fall Semester – Total: 15cr

  • BGEN105 Introduction to Business 3cr
  • M108 Business Mathematics 3cr (Computation)
  • BGEN235 Business Law I 3cr
  • CAPP131 Basic MS Office 3cr
  • WRIT101 College Writing I 3cr (Communications)

Freshman Year – Spring Semester – Total: 15cr

  • BMKT225 Marketing 3cr
  • COMX111 Intro to Public Speaking 3cr (Communications)
  • ECNS202 Principles of Macroeconomics 3cr
  • PSYX100 Introduction to Psychology OR
  • SOCI101 Introduction to Sociology 3cr (Human Relations)
  • CAPP158 MS Access 3cr

Sophomore Year – Fall Semester – Total: 15cr

  • WRIT122 Intro Business Writing 3cr
  • BMGT215 Human Resource Management 3cr
  • ACTG201 Principles Financial Accounting OR
  • ACTG101 Accounting Procedures I 3cr
  • ECNS201 Principles of Microeconomics 3cr
  • Elective 3cr

Sophomore Year – Spring Semester – Total: 16cr

  • BMGT237 Human Relations in Business 3cr (Human Relations)
  • BMGT210 Small Business Management 3cr
  • ACTG205 Computerized Accounting OR
  • ACTG202 Principles Managerial Accounting 3cr
  • CAPP156 MS Excel 3cr
  • STAT216 Introduction to Statistics 4cr

A.A.S. Corrosion Technology
The Corrosion Technology program prepares students for entry-level employment as a Corrosion Technician in the fields of manufacturing, oil and gas, government, pipeline maintenance, and general corrosion management. Corrosion Technicians have a basic understanding of electricity, chemistry, metallurgy, and the properties of materials. Careers in corrosion apply these sciences to detect and control chemical and mechanical deterioration. 

Students completing this degree program successfully will be able to:

  • Utilize basic knowledge of mathematics, electricity, chemistry, metallurgy, and the properties of materials to prevent or control corrosion. 
  • Apply corrosion theory to prevent, assess, and correct corrosion problems. 
  • Install, maintain, inspect, troubleshoot, and remedy corrosion problems. 
  • Adhere to safe work practices and ensure compliance with company and regulatory requirements. 
  • Identify and safely use cathodic testing equipment. 
  • Identify and apply coatings and linings. 
  • Interpret, produce, and explain technical reports, and perform field surveys. 

Plan of Study: A.A.S. Corrosion Technology

Freshman Year – Fall Semester – Total: 16cr

  • CORR101 Safety 1cr
  • CORR102 Intro to Corrosion 3cr
  • CORR103 DC Circuits 3cr
  • CORR104 Coatings and Linings 3cr
  • WRIT101 College Writing I 3cr (Communications)
  • CAPP131 Basic MS Office 3cr

Freshman Year – Spring Semester – Total: 15cr

  • CORR105 Electricity and Electrical Reactions 4cr
  • CORR106 Cathodic Protection 4cr
  • CORR107 Corrosion Technology 4cr
  • M111 Technical Math 3cr (Computation)

Sophomore Year – Fall Semester – Total: 15cr

  • CORR208 Rectifiers 3cr
  • CORR209 Internal Corrosion Control 3cr
  • CORR210 Diagrams, Schematics, and Maps 3cr
  • CORR211 Troubleshooting and Problem Solving 3cr
  • CORR298 Internship 3cr

Sophomore Year – Spring Semester – Total: 17cr

  • CORR213 Metallurgy and Corrosion 3cr
  • CORR214 Atmospheric Corrosion 3cr
  • CORR215 Field Surveys 4cr
  • CORR216 Capstone Project 4cr
  • BMGT237 Human Relations in Business 3cr (Human Relations)

Degree total 63 credits
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A.A.S. Criminal Justice

The Criminal Justice degree provides students with a foundation of knowledge and prepares students for a wide variety of careers in the diverse and dynamic field of criminal justice. The degree supports the student’s desire to seek immediate employment in the profession and/or to continue his/her education beyond the associate degree level.

Students completing this degree program successfully will be able to:

  • Identify and explain the basic structures and functions of the criminal justice system.
  • Interpret the basic concepts and functions of criminal law.
  • Apply constitutional principles that protect the rights of individuals and regulate criminal justice practices and procedures.
  • Integrate multidisciplinary theories which constitute the basis for understanding criminality and victimization.
  • Identify and describe key social and cultural issues confronting the criminal justice system.
  • Explain basic theories and concepts of criminal justice and the ethical issues involved.

Plan of Study: A.A.S. Criminal Justice

Freshman Year – Fall Semester – Total: 15cr

  • CJUS121 Introduction to Criminal Justice 3cr
  • WRIT101 College Writing I 3cr
  • PSCI210 Intro to American Government 3cr
  • SOCI101 Introduction to Sociology 3cr (Human Relations)
  • CJUS/CJLE Professional Electives 1-3cr
    May take one of the following:
  • CAPP131 Basic MS Office 3cr
  • M111 Technical Math or higher level Math 3-4cr (Computation)
  • PSYX101 Intro to Psychology 3cr (Human Relations)
  • COMX111 Intro to Public Speaking 3cr (Communications)

Freshman Year – Spring Semester – Total: Average 15cr

  • CJUS215 CJ Community Relations 3cr
  • PSCI260 Intro to State and Local Government 3cr
  • CJUS/CJLE Professional Electives 1-3cr
    At least two of the remaining:
  • CAPP131 Basic MS Office 3cr
  • M111 Technical Math or higher level Math 3-4cr (Computation)
  • PSYX101 Intro to Psychology 3cr (Human Relations)
  • COMX111 Intro to Public Speaking 3cr (Communications)

Sophomore Year – Fall Semester – Total: Average 15cr

  • CJUS200 Principles of Criminal Law 3cr
  • CJUS220 Introduction to Corrections 3cr
  • CJLE109 Police Report Writing OR
  • WRIT201 College Writing II OR
  • WRIT122 Intro to Bus Comm 3cr
  • SOCI211 Intro to Criminology* OR
  • SOCI260 Intro to Juvenile Delinquency 3cr
  • CJUS/CJLE Professional Electives 1-3cr
    At least one of the remaining:
  • CAPP131 Basic MS Office 3cr
  • M111 Technical Math or higher level Math 3-4cr (Computation)
  • PSYX101 Intro to Psychology 3cr (Human Relations)
  • COMX111 Intro to Public Speaking 3cr (Communications)

Sophomore Year – Spring Semester – Total: Average 15cr

  • CJUS231Criminal Evidence/Procedure 3cr
  • CJUS208 CJ Ethics/Leadership 3cr
  • SOCI201 Social Problems* OR
  • SOCI206 Deviant Behavior 3cr
  • CJUS/CJLE Professional Electives 1-3cr
    All of the remaining:
  • CAPP131 Basic MS Office 3cr
  • M111 Technical Math or higher level Math 3-4cr (Computation)
  • PSYX101 Intro to Psychology 3cr (Human Relations)
  • COMX111 Intro to Public Speaking 3cr (Communications)

Degree must total 60 credits
*Students must choose between SOCI211 Intro to Criminology or SOCI260 Intro to Juvenile Delinquency AND between SOCI201 Social Problems or SOCI206 Deviant Behavior
Students must take at least eight credits of CJUS/CJLE Professional Electives



The Criminal Justice Law Enforcement Peace Officer Option degree provides students with a foundation of knowledge in the field of public safety and prepares students for a career in the profession of law enforcement.

Students completing this degree program successfully will be able to:

  • Identify and explain the basic structures and functions of the criminal justice system.
  • Interpret the basic concepts and functions of criminal law.
  • Apply constitutional principles that protect the rights of individuals and regulate criminal justice practices and procedures.
  • Integrate multidisciplinary theories which constitute the basis for understanding criminality and victimization.
  • Identify and describe key social and cultural issues confronting the criminal justice system.
  • Explain basic theories and concepts of criminal justice and the ethical issues involved.
  • Demonstrate technical proficiency in law enforcement.
  • Apply knowledge of the operations of policing to various situations and scenarios.

Plan of Study: A.A.S. Criminal Justice Law Enforcement: Peace Officer Option

Freshman Year – Fall Semester – Total: Average 15cr

  • CJUS121 Introduction to Criminal Justice 3cr
  • WRIT101 College Writing I 3cr
  • CJLE105 Police Patrol Procedures OR
  • CJLE109 Police Report Writing 3cr
  • PSCI210 Introduction to American Government 3cr
  • SOCI101 Introduction to Sociology 3cr (Human Relations)
    May take one of the following:
  • CAPP131 Basic MS Office 3cr
  • M111 Technical Math or higher level Math 3-4cr (Computation)
  • PSYX101 Intro to Psychology 3cr (Human Relations)
  • COMX111 Intro to Public Speaking 3cr (Communications)

Freshman Year – Spring Semester – Total: Average 15cr

  • CJUS215 CJ Community Relations 3cr
  • CJLE108 Traffic Accident Investigation OR
  • CJLE209 Criminal Investigation 3cr
  • CJLE110 Interviewing/Interrogation OR
  • CJLE212 Defensive Tactics 1-2cr
  • PSCI260 Intro to State/Local Government 3cr
    At least two of the remaining:
  • CAPP131 Basic MS Office 3cr
  • M111 Technical Math or higher level Math 3-4cr (Computation)
  • PSYX101 Intro to Psychology 3cr (Human Relations)
  • COMX111 Intro to Public Speaking 3cr (Communications)

Sophomore Year – Fall Semester – Total: Average 15cr

  • CJUS200 Principles of Criminal Law 3cr
  • CJLE106 Basic Police Firearms Training 2cr
  • CJLE105 Police Patrol Procedures OR
  • CJLE109 Police Report Writing 3cr
  • CJLE298 CJLE Internship 1cr
  • SOCI211 Intro to Criminology OR
  • SOCI260 Intro to Juvenile Delinquency* 3cr
    At least one of the remaining:
  • CAPP131 Basic MS Office 3cr
  • M111 Technical Math or higher level Math 3-4cr (Computation)
  • PSYX101 Intro to Psychology 3cr (Human Relations)
  • COMX111 Intro to Public Speaking 3cr (Communications)

Sophomore Year – Spring Semester – Total: Average 15cr

  • CJUS231 Criminal Evidence/Procedures 3cr
  • CJUS208 CJ Ethics/Leadership 3cr
  • ECP100 First Aid and CPR 1cr
  • CJLE108 Traffic Accident Investigation OR
  • CJLE209 Criminal Investigation 3cr
  • CJLE212 Defensive Tactics OR
  • CJLE110 Interviewing/Interrogation 1-2cr
  • SOCI201* Social Problems OR
  • SOCI206* Deviant Behavior 3cr
    All of the remaining:
  • CAPP131 Basic MS Office 3cr
  • M111 Technical Math or higher level Math 3-4cr (Computation)
  • PSYX101 Intro to Psychology 3cr (Human Relations)
  • COMX111 Intro to Public Speaking 3cr (Communications)

Degree must total 63 credits
*Students must choose between SOCI211 Intro to Criminology or SOCI260 Intro to Juvenile Delinquency AND between SOCI201 Social Problems or SOCI206 Deviant Behavior.
Students must take CJLE105, CJLE108, CJLE109, CJLE209 (offered alternate years)


A.A.S. Criminal Justice Law Enforcement: Private Security Option
The Criminal Justice Law Enforcement Private Security Option degree provides students with a foundation of knowledge in the field of private security and prepares students for a career in the profession of security and loss prevention.

Students completing this degree program successfully will be able to:

  • Identify and explain the basic structures and functions of the criminal justice system.
  • Interpret the basic concepts and functions of criminal law.
  • Apply constitutional principles that protect the rights of individuals and regulate criminal justice practices and procedures.
  • Integrate multidisciplinary theories which constitute the basis for understanding criminality and victimization.
  • Identify and describe key social and cultural issues confronting the criminal justice system.
  • Explain basic theories and concepts of criminal justice and the ethical issues involved.
  • Demonstrate technical proficiency in private security and loss prevention.
  • Apply knowledge of the operations of private security to various situations and scenarios.

Plan of Study: A.A.S. Criminal Justice Law Enforcement: Private Security Option

Freshman Year – Fall Semester – Total: Average 15cr

  • CJUS121 Introduction to Criminal Justice 3cr
  • CJLE225 Intro to Security and Loss Prevention 3cr
  • WRIT101 College Writing I 3cr (Communications)
  • PSCI210 Intro to American Government 3cr
  • SOCI101 Introduction to Sociology 3cr (Human Relations)
    May take one of the following:
  • CAPP131 Basic MS Office 3cr
  • M111 Technical Math or higher level Math 3-4cr (Computation)
  • PSYX101 Intro to Psychology 3cr (Human Relations)
  • COMX111 Intro to Public Speaking 3cr (Communications)

Freshman Year – Spring Semester – Total: Average 15cr

  • CJUS215 CJ Community Relations 3cr
  • CJLE245 Security Systems 3cr
  • PSCI260 Intro to State and Local Government 3cr
    At least two of the remaining:
  • CAPP131 Basic MS Office 3cr
  • M111 Technical Math or higher level Math 3-4cr (Computation)
  • PSYX101 Intro to Psychology 3cr (Human Relations)
  • COMX111 Intro to Public Speaking 3cr (Communications)

Sophomore Year – Fall Semester – Total: Average 15cr

  • CJUS200 Principles of Criminal Law 3cr
  • CJLE109 Police Report Writing OR
  • WRIT201 College Writing II OR
  • WRIT122 Intro to Bus Comm 3cr
  • SOCI211 Intro to Criminology* OR
  • SOCI260 Intro to Juvenile Delinquency 3cr
    At least two of the remaining:
  • CAPP131 Basic MS Office 3cr
  • M111 Technical Math or higher level Math 3-4cr (Computation)
  • PSYX101 Intro to Psychology 3cr (Human Relations)
  • COMX111 Intro to Public Speaking 3cr (Communications)

Sophomore Year – Spring Semester – Total: Average 15cr

  • CJUS231Criminal Evidence/Procedure 3cr
  • CJUS208 CJ Ethics/Leadership 3cr
  • CJLE240 Security Administration 3cr
  • SOCI201 Social Problems* OR
  • SOCI206 Deviant Behavior 3cr
    All of the remaining:
  • CAPP131 Basic MS Office 3cr
  • M111 Technical Math or higher level Math 3-4cr (Computation)
  • PSYX101 Intro to Psychology 3cr (Human Relations)
  • COMX111 Intro to Public Speaking 3cr (Communications)

Degree must total 60 credits
*Students must choose between SOCI211 Intro to Criminology or SOCI260 Intro to Juvenile Delinquency AND between SOCI201 Social Problems or SOCI206 Deviant Behavior.


A.A.S. Early Childhood Education
Students successfully completing the Early Childhood Education A.A.S. degree will have acquired the requisite skills for obtaining employment or advancement in the field of early childhood care and education. The program incorporates both an academic base and lab courses to provide a balanced program to prepare highly qualified early childhood teachers/practitioners.

Students completing this program will be able to:

  • Use knowledge of how children develop and learn to provide opportunities that support the physical, social, emotional, language, cognitive, and aesthetic development of children from birth through age eight.
  • Plan and implement developmentally appropriate curriculum and instructional practices based on knowledge of individual children, special needs, the community, the importance of play, and curriculum goals and content.
  • Use individual and group guidance techniques to develop positive and supportive relationships with children, encourage positive social interaction among children, and promote positive strategies that will develop personal self-control and self-esteem in children.
  • Establish and maintain physically and psychologically safe and healthy learning environments for young children.
  • Use informal and formal assessment strategies as an on-going integral part of planning and individualizing curriculum and teaching practices.
  • Establish and maintain positive family and community relationships by communicating effectively, demonstrating sensitivity to differences, respecting parental choices and involving families in planning for their children.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the early childhood profession by being informed about professional development, legal issues, resource information, state and national regulations and opportunities that would improve quality of programs and services for young children.
  • Demonstrate the ability to work effectively during at least 300 hours of supervised lab experience in appropriate settings that serve infants, toddlers, preschoolers, or school age children up to grade three.

Plan of Study: A.A.S. Early Childhood Education

Freshman Year – Fall Semester – Total: 7cr

  • EDEC108 Intro to Early Childhood Ed 2cr
  • EDEC105 Observation and Assessment 1cr
  • EDEC247 Child and Adolescent Development 3cr
  • EDEC248 Child and Adolescent Development Lab 1cr

Freshman Year – Spring Semester – Total: 7cr

  • EDEC230 Positive Child Guidance 2cr
  • EDEC231 Positive Child Guidance Lab 1cr
  • EDEC130 Health, Safety, Nutrition in EC 3cr
  • EDEC131 Health, Safety, Nutrition Lab 1cr

Sophomore Year – Fall Semester – Total: 7cr

  • EDEC220 Creating Environment for Learning, EC 3cr
  • EDEC221 Creating Environment for Learning, EC Lab 1cr
  • EDEC210 Meeting the Needs of Families 2cr
  • EDEC211 Meeting the Needs of Families Lab 1cr

Sophomore Year – Spring Semester – Total: 6cr

  • EDEC281 EC Curriculum Design and Implementation 3cr
  • EDEC282 EC Curriculum Design and Implementation Lab 1cr
  • EDEC265 Leadership and Professionalism in EC 2cr

Competencies Required: 13 credits

  • Communications: 6 credits
    WRIT101 College Writing I 3cr
    COMX115 Intro Interpersonal Communications or COMX111 Intro Public Speaking 3cr
  • Computations: 3 credits
    CAPP131 Basic MS Office 3cr
    M108 Business Math or M121 College Algebra or above 3-4cr
  • Human Relations: 3credits
    PSYX100 Introduction to Psychology or SOCI101 Introduction to Sociology 3cr

ECE Professional Electives: 13+ credits
strongly recommended – others may also apply, see your advisor

  • EDEC249 Infant and Toddler Development and Group Care (S) 4cr
  • EDEC191 Montana Preschool Teachers Education (F) 4cr
  • EDEC198 ECE Internship (S) variable cr
  • EDSP204 Intro to Teaching Exceptional Learners (S) 3cr
  • EDU200 Introduction to Education 2cr
  • EDU202 Early Field Experience (S) 2cr (See Addendum)
  • EDU231 Literature and Literacy for Children (S) 3cr
  • EDU270 Instructional Technology (S) 3cr
  • NASX105 Native American Studies 3cr
  • PSYX272 Educational Psychology (F) 3cr
  • PSYX230 Developmental Psychology 3cr
  • SOCI215 Intro to Sociology of the Family (S) 3cr
  • SIGN120 Sign Language I (S) 3cr
  • Art/Drama/Music Elective (F/S)

Degree to total 60 credits
Each lab requires 3 to 4 hours of work experience per week at a licensed early childcare facility or Head Start (45 hours is equivalent to 1 credit hour).


A.A.S Engineering Technology
The Engineering Technology program prepares students for employment in the growing technical fields associated with engineering, construction, oil-development, as well as power generation and transfer. (This program is currently under revision)

Upon successful completion of their plan of study, students will be able to:

  • Communicate technical information, in both oral and written fashion, with members of the public as well as other technical professions.
  • Evaluate technical documents and communications for accuracy and completion.
  • Safely perform basic field-work, including accurate recording of actions taken in the field.
  • Create and interpret basic scaled field diagrams and schematics.
  • Manage financial and personnel resources for technical projects.
  • Understand ethical responsibilities involved with the construction and engineering professions.
  • Pursue employment opportunities as an engineering technician for many local industries.

Plan of Study: A.A.S. Engineering Technology

Freshman Year – Fall Semester – Total: 15cr

  • CHMY121 Introduction to General Chemistry 3cr
  • CHMY122 Introduction to General Chemistry Lab 1cr
  • EGEN105 Intro to General Engineering 1cr
  • WRIT101 College Writing I 3cr
  • ET100 Computer Apps Tech/Science 3cr or CAPP131 Intro MS Office 3cr
  • ET101 Tools, Measurements, Safety 3cr
  • WLDG117 Blueprint Reading or ET123 Intro to GPS 1cr

Freshman Year – Spring Semester – Total: 18cr

  • BMGT237220 Human Relations in Business 3cr
  • DDSN113 Technical Drafting or DDSN114 Introduction to CAD 3cr
  • ET103 Workplace Safety 3cr
  • ET104 Fields Methods 2cr
  • M151Precalculus 4cr
  • WRIT107 Technical Writing for Engineers or WRIT102 College Writing II 3cr

Summer Session

  • EGEN298 Internship 1-5cr

Sophomore Year – Fall Semester – Total: 15cr

  • Technical Elective 3cr
  • Technical Elective 3cr
  • Technical Elective 3cr
  • Technical Elective 3cr
  • ET200 Project Management 3cr

Sophomore Year – Spring Semester – Total: 16cr

  • DDSN114 Introduction to CAD or DDSN113 Technical Drafting 3cr
  • EGEN101 Intro to Engineering Calculations and Problem Solving 3cr
  • Technical Elective 3cr
  • Technical Elective 3cr
  • PHSX205 College Physics I 3cr
  • PHSX206 College Physics I Lab 1cr

Must take both DDSN113 and DDSN114 – offered alternate years


A.A.S. Music Technology

Program Mission Statement

The mission of the Music Technology program at Dawson Community College is to integrate musical, technical, and supporting discipline knowledge and skills to produce artistic, commercial, educational, and personal work using digital and other technology as the primary medium to prepare students for various professions in the field of music technology and for life-long musical enhancement.
Upon completion of the program of study students shall:

  • Gain knowledge of and ability to use various terminologies and procedures in music technology, music, supporting disciplines, and technology, and their combinations as employed in and associated with the work of music technology. This includes, but is not limited to, their respective vocabularies of practice, ways work is conceptualized, developed, synthesized, and finalized, and phases of production, presentation, and/or distribution.
  • Develop comprehensive capabilities in performance medium including the ability to work independently and in groups to prepare performances at the highest possible level; knowledge of applicable solo and ensemble literature; and orientation to and experience with fundamentals of pedagogy.
  • Increase the awareness of the heritage of music and its production, appreciation of its diversity, and develop a perception of the underlying relationship of its many styles.
  • Investigate the study of harmony in common practice, interaction of the elements of music in harmony and counterpoint, and assimilation of relationships between theory, analysis, and composition.
  • Gain an understanding of common elements and organizational patterns of music and their interaction, the ability to employ this understanding in aural, verbal, written, and visual analysis, and to gain understanding of musical forms, processes, and structures in composition, performance, analytical, scholarly, and pedagogical applications.
  • Develop practical competency and understanding of the scope, integrative nature, and functions of electroacoustic production within the field of music technology.

Plan of Study: A.A.S. Music Technology

Freshman Year – Fall Semester – Total: 15cr

  • MUSI100 Concert Attendance 0cr
  • MUSI105 Music Theory I 3cr
  • MUSI135 Keyboard Skills I 1cr
  • MUSI140 Aural Perception I 2cr
  • MUSE220 Intro to Comp App Music Ed 2cr
  • MUST191 Special Topics 1cr
  • M108 Business Math, M145 Math for Liberal Arts, M121 College Algebra, or M111 Technical Math 3cr (Computation)
  • Music Ensembles 2cr
  • Applied Music 1cr

Freshman Year – Spring Semester – Total: 18cr

  • CAPP131 Basic MS Office 3cr
  • WRIT101 College Writing I 3cr (Communications)
  • MUSI100 Concert Attendance 0cr
  • MUSI106 Music Theory II 3cr
  • MUSI136 Keyboard Skills II 1cr
  • MUSI141 Aural Perception II 2cr
  • MUST120 Introduction to Studio Recording 2cr
  • MUST191 Special Topics 1cr
  • Music Ensembles 2cr
  • Applied Music 1cr

Sophomore Year – Fall Semester- Total: 15cr

  • COMX111 Intro to Public Speaking 3cr (Communications)
  • MUSI100 Concert Attendance 0cr
  • MUSI235 Keyboard Skills III 1cr
  • MUST215 Studio Recording 3cr
  • MUST291 Special Topics 2cr
  • PSYX100 Introduction to Psychology OR
  • SOCI101 Introduction to Sociology 3cr (Human Relations)
  • Music Ensembles 2cr
  • Applied Music 1cr

Sophomore Year – Spring Semester – Total: 15cr

  • MUSI100 Concert Attendance 0cr
  • MUSI203 American Popular Music 3cr (offered alternate years)
  • MUSI236 Keyboard Skills IV 1cr
  • MUST118 MIDI Sequencing and Notation 3cr
  • MUST291 Special Topics 2cr
  • MUST299 Capstone Project 3cr
  • Music Ensembles 2cr
  • Applied Music 1cr
  • Piano Proficiency Exam or complete four (4) semesters of keyboard skills with at least a ‘C’ or better to meet proficiency requirements

A.A.S. Welding Technology
Students learn the basics of welding technology that will permit the individual to enter the field at entry level as a fabrication/welder. The student will also take academic courses to provide a well-balanced curriculum. Graduates may enter the workforce immediately or transfer for more advanced training.

Upon completion of the program, the student will be able to:

  • Demonstrate safe work habits in welding/metal fabrication.
  • Identify and use a variety of techniques and materials to achieve the desired weld.
  • Perform quality welds on mild steel using arc and gas methods.
  • Layout and cut flat structural steel.

Plan of Study: A.A.S. Welding Technology

Freshman Year – Fall Semester – Total: Minimum 16cr

  • WLDG105 Shop Safety 1cr
  • WLDG110 Welding Theory I 1cr
  • WLDG112 Cutting Processes/Lab 2cr
  • WLDG150 Welding Layout Practices 2cr
  • WLDG180 Shielded Metal Arc Welding 4cr
  • WLDG187 Flux Core Arc Welding 2cr
  • WRIT101 Intro to College Writing I 3cr (Communications)
  • ECP100 First Aid and CPR 1cr
  • Open Elective .5-3cr

Freshman Year – Spring Semester – Total: 15cr

  • BMGT237 Human Relations in Business 3cr (Human Relations)
  • M111 Technical Math 3cr (Computation)
  • WLDG117 Blueprint Reading Welding Symbols 2cr
  • WLDG133 Gas Metal Arc Welding 3cr
  • WLDG140 Intro GTAW w/ Integrated Lab 3cr
  • WLDG192 Independent Study (Open Lab) 1cr

Sophomore Year – Fall Semester – Total: 16cr

  • WLDG237 Aluminum Welding Processes 4cr
  • WLDG201 Welding, Measurement, and Trade Tools 2cr
  • WLDG241 Metal Fabrication I 4cr
  • WLDG242 Metal Fabrication II 4cr
  • WLDG292 Independent Study 2cr OR
  • WLDG298 Internship 2cr

Sophomore Year – Spring Semester – Total: 15cr

  • CAPP131 Basic MS Office 3cr
  • WLDG186 Weld Quality Test Prep 2cr
  • WLDG210 Pipe Welding 4cr
  • WLDG212 Pipe Welding Layout 4cr
  • WLDG292 Independent Study (Open Lab) OR
  • WLDG298 Internship 2cr

Minimum of 62 credits required
_____________________________________________________________________________________________

Online Curriculum (AA/AS and A.A.S.)

If you want to complete your degree online or are looking for a flexible and convenient way to earn credits toward transfer to a four year institution, DCC Online can provide you with quality programs that fit your needs.

Degrees available Online:
Refer to Curriculum Plans (AA/AS/AAS) for course listings.

  • Associate of Arts or Associate of Science Degree
  • Associate of Applied Science Degree in Business Management
  • Associate of Applied Science Degree in Criminal Justice
  • Associate of Applied Science Degree in Early Childhood Education
  • Associate of Applied Science Degree in Law Enforcement

Where do I start? Go to: https://www.dawson.edu/academics/online/

How much will it cost?
There is a flat per credit fee of $175.00 for each course you take with a $35 per course fee (example: a three credit course will cost $560.00). This does not include textbooks or other supplies. (Subject to change).

If you are taking a lab course, there will be additional lab fees. Costs of textbooks vary dependent on course(s). Prior to classes starting, you will need to order your books so you will be ready with all of your course materials on the first day of class. Please allow at least five to seven business days before the beginning of the semester.

Certificate of Applied Science (C.A.S.)

The primary purpose of the Career-Technical Certificate Programs is to provide the student with the skills that are necessary to obtain entrance level employment in the field of their educational program. Training includes job skill development as well as the necessary related technical information that is necessary to enhance an individual’s productivity in the world of work.

While the primary design of a certificate curriculum is to prepare the student for immediate employment, certain occupational education courses which are equivalent to college level academic course offerings may be accepted by some college disciplines later if the student decides to transfer to a four year institution.

Certificate of Applied Science (C.A.S.) Programs

  • Corrections Officer
  • Early Childhood Education
  • Livestock Technology
  • Welding Technology 

General Information
Minimum Competency Standards for Program Admission
Research indicates that students who participate in, and apply the results of basic skills assessment in a program of study, have a much higher rate of academic success than those who do not follow or utilize such advice. Therefore, Dawson Community College uses the results of a basic skills assessment test to direct students into appropriate English, reading and mathematics course(s) and to advise students in the selection of other courses.

Exceptions which preclude the necessity for the basic skills assessment and placement include documentation of one or all of the following criteria: if a student has a college degree or acceptable ACT or SAT test score, the assessment test is not required; an exemption is granted if the student has an ACT composite of 22 or an SAT score of 468 in math and 425 in English.

Certificate Requirements

  • Completion of coursework that is outlined in the Plan of Study.
  • Earning a minimum 2.00 cumulative grade point average from DCC.
  • Course in Computation
    • Math courses 100 and above
  • Course in Communications
    • Intro to Public Speaking
    • College Writing
    • Interpersonal Communications
  • Course in Human Relations
    • Human Relations in Business
    • Intro to Sociology
    • Intro to Psychology

C.A.S. Corrections Officer
The Corrections Officer certificate provides students with a foundation of knowledge in the field of corrections and the institutionalization of criminal offenders. The certificate program prepares students for a career in both public and private corrections and detention facilities.

Students completing this degree program successfully will be able to:

  • Identify and explain the basic structures and functions of the corrections process.
  • Apply constitutional principles that protect the rights of individuals and regulate criminal justice practices and procedures.
  • Integrate multidisciplinary theories which constitute the basis for understanding criminality and victimization.
  • Explain basic theories and concepts of criminal justice and the ethical issues involved.
  • Demonstrate technical proficiency in corrections.

Plan of Study: C.A.S. Corrections Officer

Fall Semester – Total: 16-18cr

  • CJUS220 Intro to Corrections 3cr
  • CJLE109 Police Report Writing 3cr
  • WRIT101 College Writing I 3cr (Communications)
  • SOCI101 Intro to Sociology 3cr (Human Relations)
  • SOCI211* Intro to Criminology 3cr

Must take 2-3 of the following:

  • CAPP131 Basic MS Office 3cr
  • M111 Technical Math or higher level Math 3-4cr (Computation)
  • PSYX101 Intro to Psychology 3cr (Human Relations)
  • COMX111 Intro to Public Speaking 3cr (Communications)
  • ECP100 First Aid and CPR 1cr

Spring Semester – Total: 16-18cr

  • CJUS231 Criminal Evidence/Procedure 3cr
  • CJLE212 Defensive Tactics 2cr
  • CJUS208 CJ Ethics and Leadership 3cr
  • SOCI201 Social Problems * 3cr

Must take all the remaining:

  • CAPP131 Basic MS Office 3cr
  • M111 Technical Math or higher level Math 3-4cr (Computation)
  • PSYX101 Intro to Psychology 3cr (Human Relations)
  • COMX111 Intro to Public Speaking 3cr (Communications)
  • ECP100 First Aid and CPR 1cr

Degree must total 35 credits
*Students must choose between SOCI211 Intro to Criminology or SOCI201 Social Problems


C.A.S. Early Childhood Education
The Early Childhood Education Certificate program provides a competency based curriculum and lab experience for students who wish to work in a professional childcare setting. When entering the Early Childhood Education Program proof of immunization and a criminal background check are required for the lab experience at a registered childcare facility.

Students completing this program will be able to:

  • Use knowledge of how children develop and learn to provide opportunities that support the physical, social, emotional, language, cognitive, and aesthetic development of all young children from birth through age eight.
  • Plan and implement developmentally appropriate curriculum and instructional practices based on knowledge of individual children, special needs, the community, the importance of play, and curriculum goals and content.
  • Use individual and group guidance techniques to develop positive and supportive relationships with children, encourage positive social interaction among children, and promote positive strategies that will develop personal self-control and self-esteem in children.
  • Establish and maintain physically and psychologically safe and healthy learning environment for young children.
  • Use informal and formal assessment strategies as an on-going integral part of planning and individualizing curriculum and teaching practices.
  • Establish and maintain positive family and community relationships by communicating effectively, demonstrating sensitivity to differences, respecting parental choices and involving families in planning for their children.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the early childhood profession by being informed about professional development, legal issues, resource information, state and national regulations and opportunities that would improve quality of programs and services for young children.
  • Demonstrate ability to work effectively during at least 300 hours of supervised lab experience in appropriate settings serving infants, toddlers, preschoolers, or school age children.

Plan of Study: C.A.S. Early Childhood Education

Fall Semester – Total: 14cr

  • EDEC108 Intro Early Childhood Education 2cr
  • EDEC105 Observation and Assessment 1cr
  • EDEC247 Child and Adolescent Development 3cr
  • EDEC248 Child and Adolescent Development Lab 1cr
  • EDEC220 Creating Environment for Learning 3cr
  • EDEC221 Creating Environment for Learning Lab 1cr
  • EDEC210 Meeting the Needs of Families 2cr
  • EDEC211 Meeting the Needs of Families Lab 1cr

Spring Semester – Total: 14cr

  • EDEC230 Positive Child Guidance 2cr
  • EDEC231 Positive Child Guidance Lab 1cr
  • EDEC130 Health, Safety, Nutrition in EC 3cr
  • EDEC131 Health, Safety, Nutrition Lab 1cr
  • EDEC281 EC Curriculum Design and Implementation 3cr
  • EDEC282 EC Curriculum Design and Implementation Lab 1cr
  • EDEC265 Leadership and Professionalism in EC 2cr

Competencies Required: 9 credits

  • Communications: 3 credits
    WRIT101 College Writing I 3cr OR
    COMX115 Intro Interpersonal Communications
  • Computations: 3 credits
    M108 Business Math OR
    M121 College Algebra or above 3-4cr
  • Human Relations: 3credits
    PSYX100 Introduction to Psychology OR
    SOCI101 Introduction to Sociology 3cr

Certificate to total 36 credits
Each lab requires 3-4 hours of work experience per week at a licensed early childcare facility or Head Start (45 hours =1 credit hour).


C.A.S. Livestock Technology
This program is designed for the person who plans to return to the farm or ranch to pursue a career working in the livestock production industry. The curriculum stresses production techniques that can be applied immediately to the livestock enterprise. Basic academic courses are included to provide a well-rounded education.

Upon completion of the program a student will:

  • Build a strong base of knowledge in the field of Agriculture
  • Prepare students for entry level employment in public and private Agriculture-related organizations.
  • Assist students in the development of critical thinking and problem-solving skills, and the ability to conceptualize ideas.
  • Expose students to courses in computation, communication, and human relations, and will assist students in developing an understanding and appreciation for diversity, social responsibility and the participation in public affairs.
  • Serve those students seeking a career in Agriculture by providing in-depth and practical skills-based exposure to general Agriculture.

Plan of Study: C.A.S. Livestock Technology

Fall Semester – Total: 22cr

  • NRSM101 Natural Resource Conservation 3cr
  • NRSM102 Natural Resource Conservation Lab 1cr
  • ANSC100 Introduction to Animal Science 3cr
  • EQUS150 Equine Production OR
  • AGBE278 Agri-Business Planning 3cr
  • AGBE210 Economics of Agricultural Business 3cr
  • AGED105 Microcomputers in Ag OR
  • AGED140 Leadership Development in Ag 3cr
  • WRIT101 College Writing I 3cr (Communications)
  • PSYX100 Intro to Psychology OR
  • SOCI101 Intro to Sociology 3cr (Human Relations)

Spring Semester – Total: 14-15cr

  • BIOB110 Plant Science OR
  • ANSC265 Range Livestock Production 3cr
  • ANSC265 A and P of Domestic Animals 3cr
  • ANSC266 A and P of Domestic Animals Lab 1cr
  • ANSC202 Livestock Feeding and Nutrition 4cr
  • M108 Business Math (or) Higher Level Math 3-4cr (Computation)

C.A.S. Welding Technology
The Welding Technology Certificate program provides fundamental knowledge and lab practice needed in welding and related career fields.

Upon completion of the program, the student will be able to:

  • Demonstrate safe work habits in welding/metal fabrication.
  • Identify and use a variety of techniques and materials to achieve the desired weld.

Plan of Study: C.A.S. Welding Technology

Fall Semester – Total: 15cr

  • WLDG105 Shop Safety 1cr
  • WLDG110 Welding Theory I 1cr
  • WLDG112 Cutting Processes/Lab 2cr
  • WLDG150 Layout Practices 2cr
  • WLDG180 Shielded Metal Arc Welding 4cr
  • WLDG187 Flux Core Arc Welding 2cr
  • WRIT101 Intro to College Writing I 3cr (Communications)
  • ECP100 First Aid and CPR 1cr
  • Open Elective .5-3cr

Spring Semester – Total: 15cr

  • BMGT237 Human Relations in Business 3cr (Human Relations)
  • M111 Technical Math 3cr (Computation)
  • WLDG117 Blueprint Reading Welding Symbols 2cr
  • WLDG133 Gas Metal Arc Welding 3cr
  • WLDG140 Intro GTAW w/ Integrated Lab 3cr
  • WLDG192 Independent Study (Open Lab) 1cr

Course Listing/Descriptions

All courses listed in this catalog appear alphabetically by subject area and in numerical sequence with listings broken down as follows:

  • The capital letters preceding the course indicate the subject area in which the course is offered and are used as a code.
  • The three digits immediately following the subject area code identify individual course offerings within the area of study. In general, a 100 number indicates a first year subject and a 200 rubric indicates a second year subject. Sub-100 courses (e.g. WRIT095) are non-transferable sub-college level courses.
  • The words following the course number are course titles and describe the course in a few words.
  • The capital letters following the course title and course description indicate when the course is generally offered. F indicates the course is offered in the fall, and S indicates spring. Courses may also be offered at additional times as determined by the Vice President of Academic Affairs.
  • The entry listed after the semester indicates the number of semester hours of credit the course carries.

The listing of a course in this or any other college publication does not constitute a guarantee or contract that the particular course will be offered during the time listed. All courses are subject to scheduling changes or cancellations. Every effort will be made to inform students of such changes and/or cancellations.

Classes may be listed as on demand status which means they are offered on a limited basis providing there is sufficient demand or if the class is needed to satisfy a program requirement. At the discretion of the Vice President of Academic Affairs, the class may be offered.


Accounting
ACTG101 Accounting Procedures I F 3 credits
This basic course covers the purpose and scope of accounting. Students study the difference between assets, liabilities, equity, income, and expenses. Financial statement preparation and analysis is stressed. The emphasis of this course is learning how to make decisions with the information accounting provides.

ACTG201 Principles of Financial Accounting F 3 credits
This course is an introduction to financial accounting principles and other specific topics such as: the study of a complete accounting cycle for retail and other businesses; assets, liability, and equity accounts; financial statement preparation; corporation, partnership and sole-proprietorship entities; and financial statement analysis.

ACTG202 Principles of Managerial Accounting S 3 credits
This course is a second semester course for non-accounting business students. The course is designed to introduce the various needs and uses for accounting information within a decision-making framework. The course will cover cost-volume-profit relationships, cost flows, capital budgeting, and traditional cost management.

ACTG205 Computerized Accounting S 3 credits
Prerequisite: ACTG101 or ACTG201. In this course computers are used to apply the basic principles and procedures of accrual accounting. Computer accounting applications include general ledgers, accounts receivable, accounts payable, invoicing, payroll, and inventory. Upon completion of this course the student will have a working familiarity with three popular accounting packages.

ACTG272 Principles of Financial Accounting II S 3 credits
Prerequisite: ACTG201. A continuation of Principles of Accounting I with an emphasis on those accounting concepts designed to provide information necessary for management use. Specific topics include interpreting financial statement information, study of cost systems, cost-volume-profit analysis, and organizational concepts – all of which facilitate the managerial control, planning, and decision making processes. Formerly BU272 Principles of Accounting II


Activities – May only be repeated ONCE for credit.
ACT104 Beginning Bowling S 1 credit
Instruction and practice of the fundamental skills in bowling. Additional fee required.

ACT106 Beginning Conditioning and Fitness F/S 1 credit
Fundamentals of physical fitness. The needs and interest of participants are emphasized through skilled or health related components.

ACT107 Beginning Aerobic Dance F/S 1 credit
Instruction in aerobic exercise. Formerly PE108 Aerobic Dance

ACT109 Beginning Racquetball S 1 credit
Instruction and practice of the fundamentals of racquetball. Additional fee required.

ACT110 Beginning Weight Training F 1/1 credit
Instruction in the sport of weight training.

ACT113 Beginning Softball S 1 credit
Instruction and practice of the fundamentals of softball.

ACT134 Dancing for Exercise F/S 1 credit
Lifetime dancing skills in an exercise format.

ACT146 Beginning Golf F/S 1 credit
Instruction and practice of the fundamentals of golf. Additional fee required.

ACT154 Beginning Tai Qi F/S 1 credit
Students will learn the basic concept of Qi including its functions and how to feel and use one’s own Qi to achieve optimum health. Students will physically execute the basic moves in proper order in the first half of Tai Qi Yang style. These include basic stance, ward off, single whip, white crane spreads wings, brush knee, wave hands at clouds, playing flute, etc.

ACT159 Team/Individual Sports S 2 credits
This course offers a survey of the basic terminology, skills and rules of selected team sports and individual sports, and their use in recreation and physical education. Emphasis is upon knowledge and understanding of the organization, administration, and promotion of sports, rather than mastery of performance skills.

ACT169 Beginning Tennis S 1 credit
Instruction and practice of the fundamentals of tennis.

ACT173 Beginning Fly Fishing/Fly Tying S 1 credit
This is a special interest class. Learn the basics of fly fishing and fly tying. Use the techniques learned in class during an optional weekend fishing trip. Students will learn how to select and prepare equipment, tie knots, and cast a fly line. Basic entomology will be covered. Students will tie fly patterns to imitate insects found in Montana streams and rivers. Students will learn proper fishing techniques and etiquette. Additional fee required.

ACT181 Team Roping Skills F 1 credit
Fundamentals and practice of team roping.

ACT182 Goat Tying Skills S 1 credit
Fundamentals and practice of goat tying.

ACT183 Breakaway Skills 1 credit
Fundamentals and practice of breakaway roping.

ACT184 Calf Roping Skills S 1 credit
Fundamentals and practice of calf roping.

ACT187 Steer Wrestling Skills F 1 credit
Fundamentals and practice of steer wrestling.

ACT188 Rough Stock Skills F 1 credit
Fundamentals and practice of bareback riding, saddle bronc riding, and bull riding.

ACT219 Folf F 1 credit
Students will demonstrate their knowledge and ability in the sport of disk-golf (folf) through participation in the sport.

ACT284 Rifle Cartridge Ballistics/Reloading F 1 credit
The fundamentals of rifle cartridge components, interior ballistics, exterior ballistics, reloading equipment and procedures, and how to shoot for accuracy.

ACT191/291 Special Topics F/S variable
Courses not required in any curriculum, for which there is a particular need, or given on a trial basis to determine demand.

ACT192/292 Independent Study F/S variable
These courses are directed research or study on an individual basis. Requires the consent of the instructor.

ACT294 Workshop F/S variable
This is concentrated class sessions on a topic for which a particular need has been identified.


Activities-Varsity
ACTV120 Basketball I-Varsity F/S 1 credit
Instruction and practice of fundamental skills in the collegiate-level of basketball. (Varsity) Students participate as a member of the intercollegiate sport.

ACTV121 Basketball II-Varsity F/S 1 credit
Instruction and practice of fundamental skills in the collegiate-level of basketball. (Varsity) Students participate as a member of the intercollegiate sport.

ACTV131 Softball I-Varsity F/S 1 credit
Instruction and practice of fundamental skills in the collegiate-level of softball. (Varsity) Students participate as a member of the intercollegiate sport.

ACTV133 Softball II-Varsity F/S 1 credit
Instruction and practice of fundamental skills in the collegiate-level of softball. (Varsity) Students participate as a member of the intercollegiate sport.

ACTV140 Baseball I-Varsity F/S 1 credit
Instruction and practice of fundamental skills in the collegiate-level of baseball. (Varsity) Students participate as a member of the intercollegiate sport.

ACTV143 Baseball II-Varsity F/S 1 credit
Instruction and practice of fundamental skills in the collegiate-level of baseball. (Varsity) Students participate as a member of the intercollegiate sport.

ACTV160 Rodeo I-Varsity F/S 1 credit
Fundamentals of rodeo events in practices and competition with emphasis on NIRA rules, team spirit, conditioning, and safety measures. (Varsity) Students participate as a member of the intercollegiate sport and DCC NIRA Card holders.

ACTV163 Rodeo II-Varsity F/S 1 credit
Fundamentals of rodeo events in practices and competition with emphasis on NIRA rules, team spirit, conditioning, and safety measures. (Varsity) Students participate as a member of the intercollegiate sport and DCC NIRA Card holders.

ACTV170 Volleyball I-Varsity F/S 1 credit
Instruction and practice of fundamental skills in the collegiate-level of Volleyball. (Varsity) Students participate as a member of the intercollegiate sport.

ACTV173 Volleyball II-Varsity F/S 1 credit
Instruction and practice of fundamental skills in the collegiate-level of Volleyball. (Varsity) Students participate as a member of the intercollegiate sport.

ACTV184 Pep Squad F/S 1 credit
This is a course designed to promote school spirit on campus, school functions, and at games.

ACTV185 Golf I-Varsity F/S 1 credit
Instruction and practice of fundamental skills in the collegiate-level of Golf. (Varsity) Students participate as a member of the intercollegiate sport.

ACTV186 Golf II-Varsity F/S 1 credit
Instruction and practice of fundamental skills in the collegiate-level of Golf. (Varsity) Students participate as a member of the intercollegiate sport.

ACTV220 Basketball III-Varsity F/S 1 credit
Instruction and practice of fundamental skills in the collegiate-level of basketball. (Varsity) Students participate as a member of the intercollegiate sport.

ACTV221 Basketball IV-Varsity F/S 1 credit
Instruction and practice of fundamental skills in the collegiate-level of basketball. (Varsity) Students participate as a member of the intercollegiate sport.

ACTV231 Softball III-Varsity F/S 1 credit
Instruction and practice of fundamental skills in the collegiate-level of softball. (Varsity) Students participate as a member of the intercollegiate sport.

ACTV233 Softball IV-Varsity F/S 1 credit
Instruction and practice of fundamental skills in the collegiate-level of softball. (Varsity) Students participate as a member of the intercollegiate sport.

ACTV240 Baseball III-Varsity F/S 1 credit
Instruction and practice of fundamental skills in the collegiate-level of baseball. (Varsity) Students participate as a member of the intercollegiate sport.

ACTV243 Baseball IV-Varsity F/S 1 credit
Instruction and practice of fundamental skills in the collegiate-level of baseball. (Varsity) Students participate as a member of the intercollegiate sport.

ACTV260 Rodeo III-Varsity F/S 1 credit
Fundamentals of rodeo events in practices and competition with emphasis on NIRA rules, team spirit, conditioning, and safety measures. (Varsity) Students participate as a member of the intercollegiate sport and DCC NIRA Card holders.

ACTV263 Rodeo IV-Varsity F/S 1 credit
Fundamentals of rodeo events in practices and competition with emphasis on NIRA rules, team spirit, conditioning, and safety measures. (Varsity) Students participate as a member of the intercollegiate sport and DCC NIRA Card holders.

ACTV270 Volleyball III-Varsity F/S 1 credit
Instruction and practice of fundamental skills in the collegiate-level of Volleyball. (Varsity) Students participate as a member of the intercollegiate sport.

ACTV273 Volleyball IV-Varsity F/S 1 credit
Instruction and practice of fundamental skills in the collegiate-level of Volleyball. (Varsity) Students participate as a member of the intercollegiate sport.

ACTV285 Golf III-Varsity F/S 1 credit
Instruction and practice of fundamental skills in the collegiate-level of Golf. (Varsity) Students participate as a member of the intercollegiate sport.

ACTV286 Golf IV-Varsity F/S 1 credit
Instruction and practice of fundamental skills in the collegiate-level of Golf. (Varsity) Students participate as a member of the intercollegiate sport.


Agricultural Business and Economics
AGBE210 Economics of Agricultural Business F 3 credits
Topics include the theory of demand, product supply, and performance of the economy as a whole. Various economic policies are considered. Basics of marketing are studied. Marketing strategies and problems associated with agriculture commodities are also studied.

AGBE278 Agri-Business Business Planning Alt Yr/S 3 credits
This is a capstone course encompassing all of the skill sets taught in the Ag curriculum.


Agricultural Education
AGED105 Microcomputers in Agriculture F 3 credits
The course deals with utilizing and selecting microcomputer software for the broad field of agriculture. Decision aid software, spreadsheets, database, telecommunication, financial records, GPS, and mapping programs are emphasized. The course also involves computer applications to control, monitor, and calibrate devices.

AGED140 Leadership Development for Agriculture F 3 credits
This course deals with the process of developing and managing individuals by providing leadership and guidance at all levels of personnel development. Self-concepts are developed through situational leadership and management, principles of people management, goal setting, and belief systems. Collaborative learning and field experience are utilized.


Agricultural Sciences
AGSC194 Workshop F/S variable
Concentrated class sessions on a topic for which a particular need has been identified.

AGSC198 Internship F/S variable
A maximum of 10 total credits may be earned for work experience with approved agencies. The student must be enrolled in a vocational/technical program offering work experience and be working actively toward a degree. The student will work under the supervision of an instructor who will determine the number of credits to be earned based on the number of working hours and work responsibility. In general, 45 hours of work experience, including the seminar, is equivalent to one credit. The work experience program is directed by the college and the student’s work is controlled by the supervising instructor.

AGSC291Special Topics F/S variable
Courses not required in any curriculum, for which there is a particular need, or given on a trial basis to determine demand.

AGSC292 Independent Study F/S variable
These courses are directed research or study on an individual basis. Requires the consent of the instructor.

AGSC294 Seminar/Workshop F/S variable
Concentrated class sessions on a topic for which a particular need has been identified.


Agriculture Technology
AGTE101 Tools, Measurement and Safety F 3 credits
This course will cover identification and proper use of both hand and power tools associated with the content of this program. While safety will be an important part of every course, the issue will be examined in greater depth within this course. Specific topics will include shop and field safety, equipment and tool safety, welding safety, personal safety devices, farm rescue, and associated topics. Additional fee required.

AGTE150 Electricity AC/DC for Ag Apps F 3 credits
This course is designed to provide a fundamental knowledge of the theory, operation, and safety related to both industrial and low voltage applications. Students will learn about high voltage, high amperage power and low voltage current. Basic operating characteristics of motors, regulators, and controls found in agricultural machinery will also be covered. Study will cover farm power from voltage three phase down to 12 volt DC ag machinery.

AGTE160 Ag Equipment Service Fundamentals F 3 credits
Proper equipment service and maintenance are the focus of this class. Lubrication, filters, wear detection, part replacement, scheduling, preventative maintenance and repair, and proper fuel selection will be included. Students will learn how to keep equipment in production.

AGTE194/294 Workshop F/S variable
Concentrated class sessions on a topic for which a particular need has been identified.

AGTE198/298 Internship: Ag Power/Machinery F/S variable
A maximum of three credits may be earned for work experience with approved agencies. Students must be enrolled in a vocational/technical program and be working actively toward a degree. The student will work under the supervision of an instructor who will determine the number of credits to be earned based on the number of working hours and work responsibility. In general, 45 hours of work experience including the seminar, is equivalent to one credit. The internship program is directed by the college and the student’s work is controlled by the supervising instructor.

AGTE205 Hydraulics S 3 credits
This course will examine the principles and operation of hydraulic power systems from transmissions to lifting devices. Proper maintenance, safety procedures, and repair will be critical components of the curriculum. Students will learn to fabricate using hydraulics to perform work. They will design systems, sizing hydraulic applications to achieve efficient work and utility. Related equipment, like pumps, cylinders, reservoirs, motors, filters, valves, and pressure regulators will be studied.

AGTE232 Farm and Ranch Machinery F 4 credits
Operation, maintenance and repair of a wide variety of machinery will be covered here. Primary focus will be on tillage, planting, cultivation, and harvesting machinery but the course will also include ranch equipment such as windmills, feeders, corrals, and livestock equipment. Both powered and non-powered machinery will be included to cover most of the common equipment found on farms and ranches of eastern Montana.

AGTE250 Ag Power Transmission S 4 credits
This course will cover topics related to the transfer of power from motor or engine to the work. Specific emphasis will be placed on standard transmissions, automatic transmissions, direct drives, gear reductions, belt drive systems, chain drive systems, power takeoffs, remote hydraulics, and remote electrical applications. Proper operation, maintenance, diagnostics, and repair of these systems will be included.

AGTE255 Agricultural Electronics S 3 credits
Prerequisite: ET110. This course is designed to provide the student with a basic understanding of electronics in a wide range of applications. Circuit components and their function will be covered along with the interconnection of electronic components. Study will include power supply switches, relays, regulators, wiring, capacitors, resistors, and indicators. A major focus of the course will be on circuit logic, troubleshooting, and repair.

AGTE260 Farm and Ranch Engines S 4 credits
Both gasoline and diesel engines will be addressed in this course. Topics ranging from basic operating principles to advanced diagnostics will be covered in detail. Proper operation and preventative maintenance will be stressed along with field based repair procedures. The basic intent of the course is to teach students, internal combustion principles so they can operate, maintain, and recognize potential engine problems. Students will learn how to keep engines in production. Formerly AP250 Farm and Ranch Engines (Gas and Diesel Engines)

AGTE291 Special Topics F/S variable
Courses not required in any curriculum, for which there is a particular need, or given on a trial basis to determine demand.

AGTE292 Independent Study F/S variable
These courses are directed research or study on an individual basis. Requires the consent of the instructor.


Allied Health: Athletic Training
AHAT210 Prevention and Care of Athletic Injuries F 3 credit
This course is designed to introduce the prospective coach and physical educator to the role of the trainer in injury prevention, treatment, and rehabilitation. Identification of injuries common to major sports is also studied. The student is given the opportunity to develop skills in taping techniques and the use of heat and cryogenic therapy.


Allied Health: Medical Support
AHMS144 Medical Terminology F 3 credits
This is an integral, helpful course for any student who is planning to work in a medical environment. Nursing, pre-med, medical technology, veterinary science, veterinary technician, pharmacy, pharmacy technician, occupational or physical therapy, occupational or physical therapy technician, medical record coder, medical billing technician, medical insurance, and medical transcriptionists are all fields which involve the language of medicine. This course is an introduction to medical word building through the study of prefixes, suffixes, and Latin word roots, using a body system approach.

AHMS154 Advanced Medical Terminology S 3 credits
Prerequisite: AHMS144. This is an integral, helpful course for any student planning to work in a medical environment. Nursing, pre-med, medical technology, veterinary science, veterinary technician, pharmacy, pharmacy technician, occupational or physical therapy, occupational or physical therapy technician, medical record coder, medical billing technician, medical insurance, and medical transcription are all fields which involve the language of medicine. A continuation of AHMS144 completes the study of medical terms using a body system approach.

AHMS255 Medical Transcription I S 3 credits
This course emphasizes development of accuracy, speed and medical knowledge for transcription of letters, chart notes, history and physical examination reports, consultations, emergency room reports and discharge summaries, etc., and/or other reports.


Animal Science
ANSC100 Introduction to Animal Science F 3 credits
This course is an introductory animal science course which includes basic principles of animal genetics, nutrition, live animal evaluation, reproduction, and application to the production of beef and dairy cattle, sheep, swine, horses, and poultry.

ANSC202 Livestock Feeding and Nutrition S 4 credits
This course deals with the digestion and metabolism of nutrients, nutrient requirements, feed composition, diet formulation, and practical feeding of various classes of animals, nutrient content of feeds, their digestion and absorption. Emphasis on developing balanced rations using various feeds. Rations are balanced using feeds that are common to or readily available to Montana. Special attention is given to rangeland environments and seasonal changes.

ANSC262 Range Livestock Production S 3 credits
Prerequisite: NRSM101, and ANSC100, or consent of instructor. The course teaches principles of beef and sheep production in rangeland environments. Breeding, reproduction, nutrition, marketing, and distribution are examined.

ANSC265 A & P of Domestic Animals S 3 credits
Prerequisite: BIOB160, Sophomore standing. Co-requisite: ANSC266. The lecture defines and identifies the organization of cell types into tissues and organ systems. The lecture explains the physiology of organ systems in domestic farm animals. 

ANSC266 A & P of Domestic Animals Lab S 1 credit
Prerequisite: BIOB160, Sophomore standing. Co-requisite; ANSC265. Location, structure and identification of various tissues, organs, and systems of domestic animals through dissection of cadaver animals. Lab utilizes ruminants of monogastric species. 


Anthropology
ANTY101 Anthropology & the Human Experience S 3 credits – Core III or Core VI
A survey of cultural and physical anthropology; the origin and development of human beings and their cultures, ethnic identities, kinship, structure, the development of economic, social and political structures are examined in depth.

ANTY191/291 Special Topics F/S variable
These courses are designed to meet particular needs or are given on a trial basis to determine demand.

ANTY192/292 Independent Study F/S variable
Students are directed to research or study on an individual basis. These courses require the consent of the instructor.

ANTY194/294 Workshop F/S variable
Concentrated class sessions on a topic for which a particular need has been identified.


Art: Art History
ARTH101 Foundations of Art F/S 3 credits – Core II, Category I or Category II
This course will provide an introductory overview to the elements of visual arts. Students are presented with a variety of art experiences including various media and production processes, the language of aesthetics, and art criticism. The terminal objective of this class is to give students the opportunity to create art, to explore aesthetics, and to gain an awareness of the visual world around them. Students interested in an introduction to the basic language of art, education majors, or those seeking an AA degree are encouraged to enroll. Additional fee required.

ARTH160 Global Visual Culture (Art Appreciation) F/S 3 credits – Core II, Category II or Core VI
This course is a foundation for the understanding and appreciation of many art forms of the world including major movements, artists, and specific works. The interrelationship of art to society is explored via lectures, imagery, and class discussions.

ARTH200 Art of World Civilization I (Art History) F/Alt Yr 3 credits – Core II, Category II or Core VI
A well-rounded student requires an exposure to the history of mankind’s artistic achievements. The purpose of this class is to acquaint the student with an historic panorama of the visual arts, the trends, and the creative spirit of the masters. The scope of this section of art history covers visual arts traditions from around the world including the Paleolithic period through the medieval period.

ARTH201 Art of World Civilization II (Art History) S/Alt Yr 3 credits – Core II, Category II
Art of World Civilization II continues with a chronological overview of visual arts traditions from around the world including the Gothic period through the present. One may enter Art of World Civilization II without taking Art of World Civilization I.


Art: Visual Arts
Please Note: Studio Art Courses – Students are required to furnish their own supplies for studio art classes. Cost of these supplies will vary from class to class. Supply lists are available at the college bookstore and students are expected to come prepared for the first class session. The student may contact the instructor prior to the start of class with any questions or concerns regarding the requisite supplies.

ARTZ105 Visual Language – Drawing F/S 3 credits – Core II, Category I
This introductory lecture/production class is designed to provide study and practice in the basic elements of drawing. The traditional subject areas of still life, landscape, and portraiture are presented for study and exploration in a variety of media and techniques. Recommended for all levels of experience, this course has no prerequisites, but is fundamental for students planning to continue to explore the visual arts. Additional fee required.

ARTZ211 Drawing I – Figure F/S 3 credits – Core II, Category I
Utilizing the lecture/production format presented in ARTZ105, students will study the human figure and anatomy with a focus on developing observational drawing skills and creative approaches to rendering the body. Additional fee required.

ARTZ212 Drawing Studio F/S 3 credits – Core II, Category I
Utilizing the lecture/production format presented in ARTZ105, this course expands the study & practice in the basic elements of drawing. The traditional subject areas of still life, landscape, and portraiture are presented for study & exploration in a variety of media and techniques with emphasis placed upon design principles and expressive use of materials. One should consider this course if one has successfully completed ARTZ105. Consent of the instructor is required for those not fulfilling this prerequisite. Additional fee required.

ARTZ221 Painting I F/Alt Yr 3 credits – Core II, Category I
This course introduces students to the basic technical aspects of paint handling and manipulation, composition, color theory and mixing. Students will explore critical and conceptual concerns, such as visual problem solving and development of personal expression and visual language. This course is recommended for beginning and advanced students. Additional fee required.

ARTZ222 Painting Studio S/Alt Yr 3 credits – Core II, Category I
Prerequisite: ARTZ221, or consent of instructor. This course continues to explore the technical and conceptual concerns of ARTZ221 Assignments foster the creative use of materials and personal artistic growth through expansion of styles and subject matter. Additional fee required.

ARTZ224 Watercolor I F/Alt Yr 3 credits – Core II, Category I
Prerequisite: ARTH101, ARTZ105 or consent of instructor. Watercolor I is designed to introduce a variety of techniques applicable to watercolor painting to the beginning student. The class concentrates on building skills and development of confidence with the medium. Additional fee required.

ARTZ225 Watercolor Studio S/Alt Yr 3 credits – Core II, Category I
Prerequisite: ARTZ224. Watercolor II provides the opportunity to develop individual style and explore a variety of creative techniques applicable to watercolor procedure. Additional fee required.

ARTZ291 Special Topics F/S variable
Courses not required in any curriculum, for which there is a particular need, or given on a trial basis to determine demand. Additional fee required.

ARTZ292 Independent Study F/S variable
These courses are directed research of study on an individual basis. Requires the consent of the instructor.

ARTZ294 Workshop F/S variable
Concentrated class sessions will be held on a topic for which a particular need has been identified.

Note: See Photography course section for PHOT154 Exploring Digital Photography


Astronomy
ASTR110 Intro to Astronomy On demand 3 credits
This course is a general study of astronomy: the earth’s movements, the solar system, stars and galaxies. Telescope observations of planets, stars, and nebulae are made. It includes demonstrations of optics and spectrum analysis by grating interference. It is designed for non-science majors.

ASTR111 Intro to Astronomy Lab On demand 1 credit


Biology: General
BIOB101 Discover Biology F 3 credits – Core IV
This is a general survey course providing an overview of biology. The course includes an introduction to cells (both plant and animal), the relationship between cells and energy (cellular respiration and photosynthesis) and the cell cycle (mitosis). Inheritance and the role of genetics in today’s world is also presented. The relationship between plants, animals and their environment is also explored.

BIOB102 Discover Biology Laboratory F 1 credit – Core IV
Includes laboratory experiments and exercises from different areas of biology and is used to supplement material covered in the lecture course. Additional fee required.

BIOB110 Plant Science S 3 credits
Prerequisite: NRSM101. This course provides an understanding of basic plant science principles and environmental components that impact plant growth and plant interaction with agriculture and humankind. Students develop solutions to problems.

BIOB160 Principles of Living Systems F/S 3 credits – Core IV
This course is an introduction to the structure, function, and reproduction at the cellular level of organization. This will include the study of both plant and animal cells. This course is designed to be an introductory course for other biology courses.

BIOB161 Principles of Living Systems Laboratory F/S 1 credit – Core IV
A series of laboratory experiments and exercises illustrating and supporting concepts studied in BIOB160. Additional fee required.

BIOB170 Principles of Biological Diversity S 3 credits – Core IV
This course is designed to help students understand and apply major concepts in organismal biology including the diversity, evolution, and ecology of organisms. The origin of life and the evolution of cells, classification and evolution of organisms, major domains and kingdoms of life, natural selection and evolution, species diversity, ecosystems organization and energy flow, community interactions, population ecology and behavioral ecology will be discussed. CHMY 121 or higher is highly recommended.

BIOB171 Principles of Biological Diversity Laboratory S 1 credit – Core IV
A series of laboratory experiments and exercises illustrating and supporting concepts studied in BIOB170. Additional fee required.

BIOB291 Special Topics F/S variable
These courses are designed to meet particular needs or are given on a trial basis to determine demand.

BIOB292 Independent Study F/S variable
Students are directed to research or study on an individual basis. These courses require the consent of the instructor.

BIOB294 Seminar/Workshop F/S variable
Concentrated class sessions on a topic for which a particular need has been identified.


Biology: Human
BIOH201 Human Anatomy Physiology I F 3 credits – Core IV
Prerequisite: BIOB160 or consent of instructor. This class will be a study of human physiology and anatomy that is particularly suitable for nurses, physical education majors, biology majors, and the allied health professions. This semester will include cellular biology, the skeletal system, the integumentary system, muscular system, and the nervous system. Co-requisite: BIOH102.

BIOH202 Human Anatomy Physiology I Lab F 1 credit – Core IV
A series of laboratory experiments and exercises illustrating and supporting concepts studied in BIOH201. Co-requisite: BIOH201. Additional fee required.

BIOH211 Human Anatomy Physiology II S 3 credits – Core IV
Prerequisite: BIOH201 or consent of instructor. This class will be a study of human physiology and anatomy that is particularly suitable for nurses, physical education majors, biology majors, and the allied health professions. The second part of this two semester course sequence will incorporate the nervous system, endocrine system, cardiovascular system, digestive system, respiratory system, urinary system, and reproductive system. Co-requisite: BIOH212

BIOH212 Human Anatomy Physiology II Lab S 1 credit – Core IV
A series of laboratory experiments and exercises illustrating and supporting concepts studied in BIOH202. Co-requisite: BIOH202. Additional fee required.


Biology: Micro
BIOM250 Microbiology for Health Sciences F 3 credits – Core IV
Prerequisite: consent of instructor. An introduction to microorganisms, emphasizing bacteria. Major topics include the history of microbiology; bacterial structure, function, metabolism and genetics; viral structure and replication, sub viral particles, and an introduction to fungi and protozoans. Also included are the role of microorganisms in ecology and human health, disease processes and the immune response. Co-requisite: BIOM251.

BIOM251 Microbiology for Health Sciences Lab F 1 credit – Core IV
Laboratory work to accompany BIOM250. This course includes microscopy, staining and culture techniques, metabolism, UV induced mutations, differentiation of bacteria, and effectiveness of various antibiotics and disinfectants. Emphasis will be placed on safe practice in all aspects of microbiology laboratory work. Co-requisite: BIOM250. Additional fee required.


Business: Finance
BFIN150 Personal Finance On demand 3 credits
This course will enable the student to study personal financial planning, money management, credit and tax planning, and major expenditures.


Business: General
BGEN105 Introduction to Business F 3 credits
This course covers the meaning and the purpose of business in our society. The development of business, current trends, and an introduction to the following business areas: forms of business organization, business planning and management, human resource management, marketing, money and finance, and the social responsibilities of business.

BGEN235 Business Law F 3 credits
This course examines the legal environment faced by the members of the business community including employers, employees, property owners, retailers, consumers, lenders and borrowers. After developing a basic outline of the legal system, the course focuses on the topics of contract law and commercial transactions.

BGEN291 Special Topics F/S variable
Courses not required in any curriculum, for which there is a particular need, or given on a trial basis to determine demand.

BGEN292 Independent Study F/S variable
These courses are directed research or study on an individual basis. Requires the consent of the instructor.

BGEN294 Workshop F/S variable
Concentrated class sessions on a topic for which a particular need has been identified.

BGEN298 Internship F/S variable


Business: Management
BMGT210 Small Business Entrepreneurship S 3 credits
Prerequisite: BGEN105. This course acquaints the student with the basics of management through the study of the problems and procedures involved in organizing, planning, directing, and controlling a small business. Writing a business plan is central to this course.

BMGT215 Human Resource Management F 3 credits
This course covers the major legislation affecting the management of people including the topics of discrimination, sexual harassment, employment at will, and the Americans with Disabilities Act. The course also covers the topics of hiring and firing employees, discipline, evaluation processes, compensation, and business ethics.

BMGT237 Human Relations in Business S 3 credits
The study of the interaction of people in work and life situations is the focus of this course. The course will acquaint the student with organizational issues, the ability to work with people and how to deal with problems rationally. The course also deals with how to develop a greater sensitivity toward behavioral patterns, distinct ways of thinking, feeling and acting.


Business: Management Information Systems
BMIS122 Internet as a Value Added Marketing Tool S 1 credit
Students will learn the basic principles of using the internet as a marketing tool. Topics will include researching options, developing a profitable strategy, implementation of that strategy, and evaluating the outcome.


Business: Marketing
BMKT225 Marketing S 3 credits
Prerequisite: BGEN105. This course is designed to acquaint the student with the study of the marketing mix (product, price, promotion and distribution), consumer behavior, and the implication of marketing decisions. A specific point of emphasis is marketing in today’s electronic commerce and social media environments.


Chemical Addiction Studies
CAS194/294 Seminar/Workshop F/S variable
These are concentrated class sessions on a topic for which a particular need has been identified.

CAS210 Individual Counseling F/Alt Yr 4 credits
This course examines the principles of effective helping and counseling individuals one at a time. Basic counseling and interviewing theories are learned and concept competence demonstrated through exams and writing assignments. These concepts provide the philosophies and approaches to work with any client. 

CAS225 Group Counseling S/Alt Yr 4 credits
This course covers therapies in small groups. The major stages in group development, with their unique challenges for leaders, co-leaders and members, are learned. Students learn to set goals and objectives, anticipate problems, develop plans, and devise techniques to use in group. 

CAS231 Pharmacology/Addictions F 4 credits
This course studies the psycho-pharmacology of psychoactive drugs. The impacts on the individual are detailed. As the perspective broadens, implication for assessment and placement as well as modes of treatment and prevention are studied. This course examines medications that are commonly prescribed for psychiatric disabilities; descriptions of medication effects, interaction, and side effects.  

CAS233 Chem Dependence and Addiction Theory F/Alt Yr 4 credits
This course examines the theories and empirical evidence behind the accepted theories of chemical addiction and dependence. The early disease model will be studied to identify its strengths and weaknesses. Alternative perspectives will be covered in order to glean their strengths and weaknesses. Online, students will discuss the pros and cons of all perspectives. They will also summarize their personal positions re: dependence and addiction theories in a final paper. The impact of these causative beliefs in directing diagnosis and treatment will be raised. Thus, this course will provide an overall introduction to addiction counseling. The class will also provide an introduction to the assessment and treatment of alcoholism and other chemical dependencies, with emphasis on the application of specific clinical strategies to this specialized problem area. Since substance abuse may underlie of coexist with a variety of other problems, including family violence, mental illness, health issues, etc., the mental health professional trained in the assessment and treatment of chemical dependency will be better able to assess and intervene appropriately. This course is taught online. 

CAS234 Family Counseling S/Alt Yr 4 credits
This course is designed to help students understand family dynamics from an addiction perspective. What is a dysfunctional family? What sorts of problems does it contain? What are typical psycho-dynamic defenses and how do they manifest in the roles assumed in such a family? Focus will shift to the developmental process behind relationships: what are the formative factors behind successful relationships? How do we recognize and improve good relationships?

CAS260 Addiction Assess/Documentation F/Alt Yr 4 credits
This course provides 45 contact hours in assessment, patient placement, and treatment planning for Chemical Dependency students. An additional fifteen contact hours are dedicated to examining the laws, principles, and practices of documentation in the CD field. Students will learn the principles of Measurement and Assessment. They will apply some Assessment Instruments in simulations, learning how to administer, score, interpret and use the acquired information to make diagnoses, prepare treatment plans, and decide how and where to place clients for their maximum benefit. Students will apply the principles of documentation used in Chemical Dependency Counseling.

CAS265 Multicultural Competence and Ethics S/Alt Yr 4 credits
This course examines culturally-based perspectives to counseling clients from non-dominant cultures – including the approaches counselors must take to meet culturally-based rules and expectations. Included is an exploration of all the related ethics for counseling competence in Chemical Dependency counselor behavior. This course is designed to examine cultural and ethical constructs related to addictions counseling. This course will focus on current literature, theories, approaches, strategies, and techniques shown to be effective when working with populations of clients with addictions. 

CAS266 Ethics for CAS F/S Aft Yr 1 credit
This course explores the concept of ethics as applied to the Chemical Dependency counselor behaviors.

CAS270 Gambling/Gaming Disorder Assessment and Counseling I F 1 credit
This course sequence satisfies the Montana State 2016 requirement for all LAC licensees to complete 15 hours of training to assess, place, and treat individuals with online gambling and gaming disorders, and includes online addictions as described in the new DSM-5. In conjunction with CAS272, it is one half of the 30 hours required for licensee applicants. 

CAS272 Gambling/Gaming Disorder Assessment and Counseling II F 1 credit
This 15 hour course in sequence with CAS270 completes the Montana State 2016 requirement for all LAC candidates to complete 30 hours of training to assess, place, and treat individuals with gambling and gaming disorders, and includes online addictions as in the new DSM-5. 

CAS291 Special Topics F/S variable
Courses not required in any curriculum, for which there is a particular need, or given on a trial basis to determine demand. Such as Ethics for CD Counselors and Culturally Effective Substance Abuse Counseling.

CAS292 Independent Study F/S variable
These courses are directed research or study on an individual basis. Requires the consent of the instructor.


Chemistry
CHMY121 Intro to General Chemistry F 3 credits – Core IV
Prerequisite: high school algebra or consent of instructor. The basic principles of modern chemistry, including measurement, atomic theory and structure, the periodic table, covalent and ionic bonding, nomenclature, stoichiometry, the gas laws, solutions, acids and bases, chemical equilibrium, and nuclear chemistry. Co-requisite: CHMY122.

CHMY122 Intro to General Chemistry Laboratory F 1 credit – Core IV
Laboratory work to accompany CHMY121. This course includes basic experiments which support the concepts covered in CHMY121. Gathering and analysis of empirical data, along with laboratory safety and technique, will be emphasized. Co-requisite: CHMY121. Additional fee required.

CHMY123 Intro to Organic and Biochemistry S 3 credits – Core IV
Prerequisite: CHMY121/CHMY122 or equivalent course. A continuation of CHMY121, emphasizing organic and biochemistry. Topics covered include organic nomenclature, functional groups, organic reactions, major classes of biological molecules, and metabolism. Co-requisite: CHMY124.

CHMY124 Intro to Organic and Biochemistry Laboratory S 1 credit – Core IV
Laboratory work to accompany CHMY123. This course includes basic experiments which support the concepts covered in CH109, emphasizing laboratory safety and technique. Included are organic synthesis and purification, properties and differentiation of functional groups, and properties and differentiation of biological molecules. Co-requisite: CHMY123. Additional fee required.

CHMY141 College Chemistry I F 4 credits – Core IV
Prerequisite: minimum of two years high school algebra or consent of instructor. A more mathematically intensive approach to the topics of general chemistry, intended for science-oriented majors. Topics covered include matter and measurement, atomic theory, chemical reactions, stoichiometry, aqueous reactions, solution stoichiometry, thermochemistry, electronic structure, the periodic table, chemical bonding, molecular geometry, and gases. Co-requisite: CHMY142.

CHMY142 College Chemistry Laboratory I F 1 credit – Core IV
Laboratory work to accompany CHMY141. This course includes basic experiments which support the concepts covered in CHMY141. Gathering and analysis of empirical data, along with laboratory safety and technique, will be emphasized. Co-requisite: CHMY141. Additional fee required.

CHMY143 College Chemistry II S 4 credits – Core IV
Prerequisite: CHMY141/CHMY142 or consent of instructor. A continuation of CHMY141 including intermolecular forces, solutions, chemical kinetics, chemical equilibrium, acid/base equilibria, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, nuclear chemistry, and miscellaneous descriptive chemistry topics relevant to lab work. Co-requisite: CHMY144.

CHMY144 College Chemistry Laboratory II S 1 credit – Core IV
Laboratory work to accompany CHMY143. This course includes basic experiments which support the concepts covered in CHMY143. Gathering and analysis of empirical data, along with laboratory safety and technique, will be emphasized. Co-requisite: CHMY143. Additional fee required.

CHMY194/294 Seminar/Workshop F/S variable
These are concentrated class sessions on a topic for which a particular need has been identified.

CHMY290 Undergraduate Research F/S variable
These courses are directed research or study on an individual basis. Requires the consent of the instructor.

CHMY291 Special Topics/Experimental Course F/S variable
Courses not required in any curriculum, for which there is a particular need, or given on a trial basis to determine demand.


Coaching
COA192/292 Independent Study F/S variable
These courses are directed research or study on an individual basis. Requires the consent of the instructor.

COA194/294 Workshop F/S variable
This is concentrated class sessions on a topic for which a particular need has been identified.

COA205 Introduction to Coaching F 3 credits
This course is designed to prepare the student to meet the challenges of modern-day coaching. The intention is to expose the student to a variety of coaching philosophies. This course will provide the student with coaching techniques to meet the needs of today’s athlete.

COA210 Introduction to Sports Officiating F 2 credits
This is a survey of games and sports with special emphasis on rules and officiating.

COA291 Special Topics F/S variable
Courses not required in any curriculum, for which there is a particular need, or given on a trial basis to determine demand.


Communications
COMX111 Introduction to Public Speaking F/S 3 credits – Core I
This course is a performance course in public speaking. The student will apply the principles of oral public communication in speeches presented to the class.

COMX115 Introduction to Interpersonal Communications F/S 3 credits
This course attempts to develop an awareness of, and insight into, the choices made by participants in face-to-face, non-public, human communication. Experiential exercises encourage the student to apply this understanding, and to use it in interpreting his/her own and other people’s attempts at communication.

COMX194/294 Seminar/Workshop F/S variable
Concentrated class sessions on a topic for which a particular need has been identified.

COMX291 Special Topics F/S variable
Courses not required in any curriculum, for which there is a particular need, or given on a trial basis to determine demand.

COMX292 Independent Study F/S variable
These courses are directed research or study on an individual basis. Requires the consent of the instructor.


Computer Applications
CAPP131 Basic MS Office F/S 3 credits – Core V (Required)
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. This course provides an overview of the Microsoft Office Suite of applications including Word, Excel, Access, and PowerPoint. Students will also learn to use the Internet/World Wide Web as a business tool.

CAPP154 MS Word S 3 credits
Prerequisite: CAPP131 or equivalent. Word processing software has a wide variety of applications, and this course continues to provide instruction in these applications using MS Word. Topics covered include merge, sorting, macros, creating forms, working with tables, creating charts, working with styles and creating outlines, master documents, sub-documents, and shared documents. Students completing this course may qualify for Microsoft Certification.

CAPP156 MS Excel S 3 credits
Prerequisite: CAPP131 or consent of instructor. This course introduces the use of Excel for the organization, display, and analysis of numerical data. Topics include creating, editing and formatting worksheets, charting, lists, integration, macros, and multiple worksheets.

CAPP158 MS Access S 3 credits
Prerequisite: CAPP131. This course introduces the use of a database for the organization. Students will learn to use to use Microsoft Access to complete a series of projects serve to illustrate how data is handled in the business world, by creating relational tables, multi-table queries, forms, and reports.


Computer Science/Programming
CSCI103 Breadth-First Programming F 3 credits
This is the first class for Web Development majors. In this class, students will be introduced to computer programming at the lowest level. Students will learn how the CPU interacts with RAM to process data through several programming activities and assignments. Topics include numbering systems (binary, decimal, and hexadecimal), machine code, MS Debug, 16-bit assembly, and 32 bit assembly.

CSCI100 Introduction to Programming F 4 credits
This is an introductory course in computer science that focuses on the architecture of current microcomputers, the role of the operating system, simple data types, data structures, functions, pointers, and modular programming. Students will study these topics by creating simple programs in a common programming language. Students will also be introduced to object-oriented programming.

CSCI110 Programming with Visual Basic I On demand 3 credits
Prerequisite: CAPP138. This course is an introduction to Microsoft Visual Basic Net. Students will create object-oriented applications using forms, text boxes, labels, buttons, radio buttons, and check boxes. Prior programming experience is necessary.

CSCI111 Programming with Java I F 3 credits
This course represents the first semester of an objects-first introductory track that covers the fundamental programming concepts in two semesters. The course introduces the fundamental concepts of programming from an object oriented perspective. Topics include simple data types, control structures, inheritance, class hierarchies, polymorphism, and abstract and interface classes as well as debugging techniques and the social implications of computing.

CSCI112 Programming with C I S 3 credits
Prerequisite: prior programming experience. This course emphasizes top-down design, modularity, efficiency, and robustness. Students will understand programming essentials such as I/O, assignments, decisions, recursion, iteration, scalar types, arrays, and structures. Students use the C programming language, and are introduced to Java and object-oriented concepts. Note: this course should be taken before CSCI110.

CSCI210 Web Programming S 3 credits
This course is about the creation of Web sites. Students learn HTML, JavaScript, and the manipulation of HTML using JavaScript and cascading style sheets.

CSCI290 Individual Problems F/S variable
These courses are directed research or study on an individual basis. Requires the consent of the instructor.

CSCI291 Special Topics F/S variable
Courses not required in any curriculum, for which there is a particular need, or given on a trial basis to determine demand.

CSCI294 Workshop F/S variable
Concentrated class sessions on a topic for which a particular need has been identified.


Construction Trades
CSTN100 Fundamentals of Construction Technology F 3 credits
A survey of construction techniques from basic carpentry to plumbing and electrical wiring. Additional fee required.

CSTN215 Woodworking I F/S 2 credits
This course involves selection, care, and use of woodworking tools; principles of joinery and simple woodworking exercises, along with the care and use of woodworking machines. Additional fee required.

CSTN216 Woodworking II F/S 2 credits
Continuation of CSTN215 involving more advanced woodworking exercises. Additional fee required.

CSTN294 Workshop F/S variable
These are concentrated class sessions on a topic for which a particular need has been identified.

CSTN291 Special Topics F/S variable
Courses not required in any curriculum, for which there is a particular need, or given on a trial basis to determine demand.

CSTN292 Independent Study F/S variable
These courses are directed research or study on an individual basis. Requires the consent of the instructor.


Corrosion Technology
CORR101 Safety F 1 credit
Provides safety orientation including the role of OSHA in job-site safety, OSHA policies, procedures and standards, construction safety and health (29 CFR 1926), safety protocols, safe use of hand and power tools, and locating equipment, recognition and correction of hazardous conditions, and the use of personal protective equipment. 

CORR102 Introduction to Corrosion F 3 credits
Introduces the fundamentals of corrosion including causes of common corrosion problems, environments in which corrosion occurs, methods for controlling corrosion, corrosion testing and monitoring, and the type of work performed by a corrosion technician. 

CORR103 DC Circuits F 3 credits
Introduces the terms, concepts, and theories of basic electricity specific to DC (Direct Current). Focuses on the fundamentals of direct current, electrical safety, application of electrical laws, methods for basic circuit analysis, functions of devices using DC current, and the use of measuring devices.

CORR104 Coatings and Linings F 3 credits
Addresses the science, types, application, use and management of industrial coatings and linings in combating corrosion. Emphasis is on coating selection, surface preparation, corrosion protection and containment of pipelines. 

CORR105 Electricity and Electrical Reactions S 4 credits
Introduces the terms, concepts, and concepts of basic electricity specific to AC (Alternating Current). Focus is on AC reactive components, AC power, AC generators, voltage regulators, AC motors, transformers, test instruments and measuring devices, and electrical distribution systems. 

CORR106 Cathodic Protection S 4 credits
Provides a comprehensive study of corrosion control, testing techniques and criteria, coatings, survey methods, data analysis and regulatory compliance for pipelines and underground storage tanks utilizing impressed and galvanic cathodic protection systems. 

CORR107 Corrosion Technology S 4 credits
Utilizes a case study approach for analyzing corrosion failures. Explores the basics of corrosion, cost of corrosion, forms of corrosion, types of industries, materials of construction (MUS), techniques for assessing the extend of corrosion, diagnostic analysis procedures, and remedial actions. 

CORR208 Rectifiers F 3 credits

CORR209 Internal Corrosion Control F 3 credits

CORR210 Diagrams, Schematics, and Maps F 3 credits

Corr211 Troubleshooting and Problem Solving F 3 credits

CORR213 Metallurgy and Corrosion S 3 credits

CORR214 Atmospheric Corrosion S 3 credits

CORR215 Field Surveys S 4 credits

CORR216 Capstone Project S 4 credits

CORR298 Internship F 3 credits
Prerequisite: CORR101, CORR105, CAPP131, M111, CORR102.
_____________________________________________________________________________________________

Ceeative Writing

CRWR240 Intro to Creative Writing Workshop S 3 Credits – Core II, Category I
Prerequisite: WRIT101 or consent of instructor. This course enables students to explore their own capacities as creative writers through critical analysis of both the students’ own writings and the writings of others combined with readings and discussions of the processes of creative writing. Students’ writings are appraised by the tutorial method and group critique.


Criminal Justice
CJUS121 Introduction to Criminal Justice F 3 credits – Core III
This course provides an overview of the complete criminal justice system, including the establishment of criminal laws, law enforcement, courts, prosecution, defense, corrections, and juvenile justice. Relevant amendments to the U.S. Constitution and court decisions are reviewed, along with landmark cases influencing the criminal justice system.

CJUS194/294 Workshop F/S variable
This is a concentrated class session on a topic for which a particular need has been determined.

CJUS200 Principles of Criminal Law F 3 credits
Criminal Law is the study of the development of criminal liability. This class covers limitations of liability, the basic requirements of an act and intent, inchoate offenses, crimes against persons, crimes against property, and crimes against public order. Defenses to certain criminal acts will also be covered.

CJUS208 CJ Ethics and Leadership S 3 credits
Ethical leadership within criminal justice agencies is critical to the efficient and effective social control of our society. This course will address the subject of ethics and leadership and how these topics are integrated and interrelated for all criminal justice personnel. This class will help the student develop leadership capabilities and problem solving skills as well as understand the importance of making ethical decisions and the consequences of unethical choices.

CJUS215 CJ Community Relations S 3 credits
The various components of the criminal justice system, namely the police, the courts, and corrections, are interrelated and interdependent. All criminal justice practitioners face the challenge of developing and maintaining meaningful relationships with each other, and with the citizens they serve in an effort to control crime. While focusing primarily on law enforcement, this course will examine the relationship and attitudes among all components of the criminal justice system and the community. Those elements that influence how the community and the criminal justice system interact will be explored and issues affecting all entities will be examined along with factors which help develop mutual understanding and support between the justice system and the community.

CJUS220 Introduction to Corrections F 3 credits
This course covers an examination of the history and theory of corrections processes, plus current correctional practices in the administration of justice, parole, probation, prisons and other correctional institutions. Laws governing the sentencing process, parole and probation, and the conditional rights of prisoners are examined. Impact of case decisions on the administration of institutions will be discussed.

CJUS230 Police Organization F 3 credits
This course focuses on the principles of organization and management as applied to law enforcement agencies. An analysis of the major problems of police administration is included, along with coverage of personnel issues, legal liability, budgeting, organizing the police function, and personnel evaluation. Current issues facing law enforcement departments will also be addressed.

CJUS231 Criminal Evidence and Procedure S 3 credits
Criminal Evidence and Procedure covers the general rules of evidence, as well as the types of evidence, admissibility of evidence, and use of evidence. Emphasis will be placed on the concepts of Probable Cause–necessary for arrests, searches and seizures–and Reasonable Suspicion–necessary for stops and frisks.

CJUS234 Introduction to Victimology in Criminal Justice F/S 3 credits
This course introduces the student to the role the crime victim plays in the criminal justice system. The traditional response that a crime victim receives from the system will be studied and the psychological, emotional and financial impact these responses have on victimization will be studied.

CJUS236 Intro to Research Methods in Criminal Justice F/S 3 credits
This course introduces students to research methods for criminal justice, with an emphasis on the scientific method and the role of empirical inquiry into criminal justice and criminology. This course will include the study of methodologies of data collection and analysis, the logic of research, the role of theory, measurement, sampling and research design, professional norms and ethical research.

CJUS271 Intro to Judicial Function F/S 3 credits
This course examines the criminal process with an analysis of the major judicial decision-makers, i.e., prosecutors, defense attorneys, judges, and the discretionary aspects of adjudication. 

CJUS290 Undergraduate Research F/S variable
These courses are directed research or study on an individual basis. Requires the consent of the instructor.

CJUS291 Special Topics F/S variable
Courses not required in any curriculum, for which there is a particular need, or given on a trial basis to determine demand.

CJUS294 Seminar/Workshop F/S variable
Concentrated class sessions on a topic for which a particular need has been identified.


Criminal Justice/Law Enforcement
CJLE105 Police Patrol Procedures F 3 credits
Prerequisite: Law enforcement, criminal justice, or corrections officer majors or consent of instructor. This course will address the responsibilities, powers and duties of the uniformed officer. Topics will include patrol procedures, field interrogation, the mechanics of arrest, and patrol as the basic operation of the police function.

CJLE106 Basic Police Firearms Training I F 2 credits
Prerequisite: Law enforcement, criminal justice, or corrections officer majors or consent of instructor. This course covers familiarization with the handgun, state laws, and court decisions regarding the use of force and firearms safety. Lab work will consist of practical applications on a firearms range with participation in various firearms qualification courses. Students will use the college’s weapons and ammunition. Additional fee required.

CJLE108 Traffic Accident Investigation S 3 credits
Prerequisite: Law enforcement, criminal justice, or corrections officer majors or consent of instructor. This course presents a background of traffic accident investigation including, but not limited to, causes, conditions of road, vehicles and people, determination of speed, prosecution of violators. The course also includes instruction in Montana traffic law.

CJLE109 Police Report Writing F 3 credits
Prerequisite: Law enforcement, criminal justice, or corrections officer majors or consent of instructor. This course is a practical approach to the writing of police reports, field notes, documentation of investigations and applications of various reports used by law enforcement. An emphasis will be placed on proper writing and spelling.

CJLE110 Interviewing and Interrogation S 1 credit
Prerequisite: Law enforcement, criminal justice, or corrections officer major or consent of instructor. This is a course that will enable the student to conduct interviews and interrogations with confidence. Successful interviews and interrogations require confidence combined with the skills obtained only through training, education and experience. Human behavior is often predictable and helps to explain that “gut feeling” experienced when behavior is not consistent with what we have learned to expect. Students will learn several methods of conducting interviews and interrogations.

CJLE113 ASP Baton Tactics 1 credit
Prerequisite: Law enforcement, criminal justice, or corrections officer majors or consent of instructor. Students will learn the basic skills and knowledge needed to proficiently use the ASP Tactical Baton. They will also become familiar with Use of Force and Montana Code Annotated in regards to justified use of force. Method of instruction will include lecture, demonstration, class discussion, and progressive training and practical exercise. Offered in a shortened course format.

CJLE114 Basic Crime Scene Investigation 1 credit
Prerequisite: Law enforcement, criminal justice, or corrections officer major or consent of instructor. This course introduces students to the skills that are necessary to investigate crimes including the topics of criminalistics, police response, crime scene processing, collection and preservation of evidence, geographic location (GPS), and pathology. Offered in a shortened course format.

CJLE116 Basic Drug Investigation 1 credit
Prerequisite: Law enforcement, criminal justice, or corrections officer major or consent of instructor. This course is designed to educate the law enforcement student in the area of drug investigation and enforcement. Students will become familiar with laws regarding narcotics, learn how to recognize illegal narcotics and related paraphernalia, document a narcotics investigation, become aware of entrapment and liability issues, and realize the dangers involved in this field of enforcement. Offered in a shortened course format.

CJLE118 Basic Drug Surveillance 1 credit
Prerequisite: Law enforcement, criminal justice, or corrections officer major or consent of instructor and completion of CJLE116. This course is a continuation of CJLE116 Basic Drug Investigation and is designed to provide the law enforcement student with practical experience in the surveillance aspect of drug investigation and enforcement. Students will become familiar with the various types of equipment utilized in drug enforcement surveillance, become familiar with the various state and federal legal codes, and will conduct practical exercises in a mock drug buy. Offered in a shortened course format.

CJLE120 Officer Survival 1 credit
Prerequisite: Law enforcement, criminal justice, or corrections officer major or consent of instructor. This course is designed to heighten police officers awareness of the critical importance of mental preparation if they are to survive a potential life threatening situation. Topics covered may include levels of mental preparedness, officer threats of injury and death, rural officer threats, use of cover and concealment, deadly tunnel, and the deadly errors that officers commit. Offered in a shortened course format.

CJLE124 Domestic Violence 1 credit
Prerequisite: Law enforcement, criminal justice, or corrections officer major or consent of instructor. This course studies the change in role of law enforcement in domestic violence, safety and interviewing techniques, fundamentals of a domestic violence investigation, documentation of evidence and report writing and special issues in investigating domestic assault cases. Offered in a shortened course format.

CJLE125 Electronic Control Device Tactics .5 credit
Prerequisite: Law enforcement, criminal justice, or corrections officer majors or consent of instructor. The objective of this training course is to instruct the student in the safe use of the TASER©. This instruction shall include, but not be limited to, TASER© use and safety, and practical scenarios will be used to assist the student in gaining TASER© proficiency. Additional fee required.

CJLE127 Oleoresin Capsicum (OC) Training .5 credit
Prerequisite: Law enforcement, criminal justice, or corrections officer majors or consent of instructor. The objective of this training course is to instruct the student in the safe use of Oleoresin Capsicum (pepper spray). This instruction shall include but not be limited to use and decontamination. The course will stress safety and practical scenarios will be used to assist the student in gaining proficiency in the use of OC.

CJLE194/294 Workshop F/S variable
Prerequisite: Law enforcement, criminal justice, or corrections officer major or consent of instructor. These are concentrated class sessions on a topic for which a particular need has been identified.

CJLE195 Police Field Work F/S 1 credit
Prerequisite: Law enforcement, criminal justice, or corrections officer major or consent of instructor. This course offers experience with a law enforcement agency while regularly enrolled as a full-time student in the law enforcement curriculum. It is offered every semester in cooperation with local agencies. Students are required to attend classroom sessions to discuss their experiences with other field work students.

CJLE200 Reserve Officer Training F 5 credits
Prerequisite: Law enforcement, criminal justice, or corrections officer major or consent of instructor. This course will provide the student with the state mandated training as a reserve officer. This will allow individuals to function as a reserve officer representative of a law enforcement agency performing general law enforcement duties. Additional fees required for the First Aid and CPR and Firearms components of the course. Additional fee required.

CJLE206 Advanced Police Firearms Training S 2 credits
Prerequisites: Law enforcement, criminal justice, or corrections officer majors; successful completion CJLE106 or CJLE200 and consent of instructor. This course will expand upon the principles and skills acquired in the beginning Police Firearms course. Students will learn a variety of combat techniques and will be required to participate in multiple firearms qualification courses and scenarios. Officer survival techniques and handgun retention will be integrated into this course. The course will stress safety, and practical range exercises will be used to assist the student in gaining advanced proficiency with firearms. Students will use the college’s weapons and ammunition. Additional fee required.

CJLE209 Criminal Investigation S 3 credits
Prerequisite: Law enforcement, criminal justice, or corrections officer major or consent of instructor. This course will cover the fundamental principles and concepts of investigation. It will include a study of the methods of investigation and techniques used at the crime scene, along with collection and preservation of evidence.

CJLE212 Defensive Tactics PPCT S 2 credits
Prerequisite: Law enforcement, criminal justice, or corrections officer majors or consent of instructor. The PPCT Pressure Point Control Tactics course is a subject control system based on tactical, legal and medical research. The PPCT System teaches a simple use of force continuum which clarifies the appropriate force level for every level of resistance. The course focuses on two primary areas: controlling low-level resistance with fingertip touch pressure to nerve pressure points and controlling high-level resistance with defensive counter strikes and the baton, which produce motor dysfunctions and controlled stuns.

CJLE225 Introduction to Security and Loss Prevention F 3 credits
This course covers the concepts of security and loss prevention, including the historical and legal basis for private security and its role in modern society. General areas covered include contract and proprietary security and asset protection. Specific topics addressed will include perimeter protection, access control, retail security, terrorism, Homeland Security, risk analysis, workplace violence, crime, pilferage, cargo security, computer security, etc.

CJLE230 Retail Security F 2 credits
This course focuses on the operation of security departments including functions of mercantile establishments, employee theft, shoplifting, and other special crimes affecting retail merchants.

CJLE240 Security Administration S 3 credits
The organization and management of security programs in business, industry, and government is the primary focus of this course. Principles of personnel management, legal liability, budgeting, evaluation, and organizing the security function are among the specific topics addressed. Current issues facing security and loss prevention organizations are addressed along with the impact that terrorism and Homeland Security has had on the overall private security function.

CJLE245 Security Systems S 3 credits
Prerequisite: Law enforcement, criminal justice, or corrections officer major or consent of instructor. This course provides a general overview of basic security equipment and systems. An analysis is provided of various security hardware and technology including locks, lights, storage, and electronic alarm devices and alarm systems. The practical application and uses of the various basic security equipment and systems will be addressed.

CJLE292 Independent Study F/S variable
Prerequisite: Law enforcement, criminal justice, or corrections officer major or consent of instructor. This is directed research or study on an individual basis.

CJLE294 Seminar/Workshop F/S variable
Prerequisite: Law enforcement, criminal justice, or corrections officer major or consent of instructor. Courses not required in any curriculum, for which there is a particular need, or given on a trial basis to determine demand.

CJLE298 Cooperative Education/Internship F/S variable
Prerequisite: Law enforcement, criminal justice, or corrections officer major or consent of instructor. A maximum of 10 total credits may be earned for work experience with approved agencies. Students must be enrolled in the Criminal Justice Law Enforcement program and be actively working toward a degree. Students work under the supervision of an instructor who will determine the number of credits to be earned based on the number of working hours and work responsibility. The work experience program is directed by the college and the student’s work is controlled by the supervising instructor. Students may be required to attend an internship seminar for the purpose of coordinating and discussing the internship experience. In general, 45 hours of internship work, including the seminar, is equivalent to one credit.


Culinary Arts
CULA102 Intro to Culinary Arts F/S 3 credits
This course will introduce students to an overview of the variety of skills and crafts included in the culinary arts. Classes will expose students to kitchen sanitation principles, vocabulary, and usage of culinary tools, cooking, baking, preservation techniques and current food trends. Additional fee required.


Dance
DANC154 Ballroom/Country Dance F/S 1 credit
Instruction in various dance steps.


Drafting Design
DDSN113 Technical Drafting S 3 credits
This course provides an introduction to the basics of drafting. Topics covered in this course include an identification of drafting equipment and its use, lettering fundamentals, line-work used on engineering drawings, geometric constructions, theories of multi-view projections, sketching techniques, principles of orthographic projection using two- and three-view drawings, basic dimensioning techniques, basic isometric drawings, and a brief coverage of sectional views.

DDSN114 Introduction to CAD S 3 credits
Prerequisite: A basic drafting course or consent of instructor. This course is designed to provide the learner with an understanding of two-dimensional computer-aided drafting. The instruction will include the use of a computer-aided drafting system. Prior knowledge of computer systems is required.

DDSN194/294 Seminar/Workshop F/S variable
Concentrated class sessions on a topic for which a particular need has been identified.

DDSN291 Special Topics F/S/ variable
Courses not required in any curriculum, for which there is a particular need, or given on a trial basis to determine demand.

DDSN292 Independent Study F/S variable
These courses are directed research or study on an individual basis. Requires the consent of the instructor.


Early Childhood Education
EDEC105 Observation and Assessment F 1 credit
This course will explore the relationship between observation and assessment for young children. It will examine the benefits, limitations, and uses of assessment and different assessment instruments, programs, and strategies.

EDEC108 Introduction to Early Childhood Education F 2 credits
This course is an introductory course to early childhood education and the childcare profession including childcare programs and options. It will focus on personal attributes needed for the childcare provider. It will also take a close look at processes to obtain CDA, associate and bachelor degrees in Early Childhood Education, Montana career path and development, Best Beginnings Program benefits, etc.

EDEC130 Health, Safety, and Nutrition in Early Childhood S 3 credits
This course explores the importance of nutritional needs, principle health issues and safety considerations that help early childhood professionals provide an environment in which children can grow and develop to their full potential. Co-requisite: EDEC131.

EDEC131 Health, Safety, and Nutrition in Early Childhood Lab S 1 credit
The student will apply and practice knowledge that was taught in class, such as planning nutritious meals and snacks and implementing healthy and safe practices at a childcare facility. The student will complete 45 hours of supervised lab with a mentor at a licensed/registered childcare facility. Co-requisite: EDEC130.

EDEC191 Montana Preschool Teachers Education F/S, 4 credits
Use for CDA Credential.

EDEC194/294 Workshop F/S variable
These are concentrated class sessions on a topic for which a particular need has been identified. Workshops include, but are not limited to, Infant and Toddler Development, Montana Preschool Training, Early Childhood Mentor/Coach Training, and Shaping the Future Conferences.

EDEC198/298 Early Childhood Education Internship F/S variable
This course will provide students with the opportunity to observe, explore, and apply learning in a childcare setting. Students are required to attend a one-hour seminar for the purpose of coordinating and discussing the internship experience and other topics. Students are required to complete 45 hours of internship work per credit at a supervised, licensed childcare facility. Consent of instructor is required.

EDEC210 Meeting the Needs of Families F 2 credits
This course will explore the benefits, barriers, foundations, and techniques for encouraging parent-teacher partnerships. It will examine family structures and dynamics, cultural values, ethnicity, and community resources. Co-requisite: EDEC211.

EDEC211 Meeting the Needs of Families Lab F 1 credit
The student will apply and practice knowledge that was taught in EDEC210, such as how to communicate positively with family and community members. The student will complete 45 hours of supervised lab with a mentor at a licensed/registered childcare facility. Co-requisite: EDEC210.

EDEC220 Creating an Environment for Learning, EC F 3 credits
This course focuses on developmentally appropriate practices and its effect on the learner. Emphasis is placed on environmental design, floor plans, lessons plans, scheduling, transitions, bulletin boards, centers, projects, etc. Co-requisite: EDEC221.

EDEC221 Creating an Environment for Learning, EC Lab F 1 credit
The student will apply and practice knowledge that was taught in EDEC220, such as establishing developmentally appropriate practices and environment. The student will complete 45 hours of supervised lab with a mentor at a licensed/registered childcare facility. Co-requisite: EDEC220.

EDEC230 Positive Child Guidance S 2 credits
This course will focus on developing skills in using positive guidance techniques while enhancing children’s self-concept and developing children’s pro-social skills. Co-requisite: EDEC231.

EDEC231 Positive Child Guidance Lab S 1 credit
The student will apply and practice knowledge that was taught in EDEC230, such as creating a pro-social environment and establishing positive guidance techniques. The student will complete 45 hours of supervised lab with a mentor at a licensed/registered childcare facility. Co-requisite: EDEC230.

EDEC247 Child and Adolescent Development F 3 credits
Students will examine research theories and issues concerning social, emotional, physical, and cognitive child development stages from conception through the early childhood years. Co-requisite: EDEC248.

EDEC248 Child and Adolescent Development Lab F 1 credit
The student will apply and practice knowledge that was taught in EDEC247, such as how to enhance a young child’s social, emotional, physical, and cognitive skills and development. The student will complete 45 hours of supervised lab with a mentor at a licensed/registered childcare facility. Co-requisite: EDEC247.

EDEC249 Infant/Toddler Development and Group Care F/S 4 credit
This is a program for infant/toddler caregivers, which focuses on meeting the needs of infants and toddlers. Students will be learning from the following modules: social-emotional growth and socialization, group care, learning and development, and culture, family and providers. Use for CDA Credential. Student must be observed by an ECE trainer. 

EDEC265 Leadership and Professionalism in Early Childhood Ed S 2 credits
Prerequisite: first eight Early Childhood Education classes. This course will focus on the early childhood profession including awareness of value and ethical and legal issues, staff relations, NAEYC and advocating for the profession, and improving the quality of services for children and their families. Students will also complete their professional portfolio, parent handbook, plan a community event, attend a NAEYC or MTCCA Committee meeting, and resume.

EDEC281 EC Curriculum Design and Implementation S 3 credits
Focus will be on developmentally appropriate activities, curriculum content, and methods in an early childhood setting. Emphasis is placed on creating relevant and meaningful curriculum in science, math, literacy, language, social studies, physical activities, music and movement, and art. Co-requisite: EDEC282.

EDEC282 EC Curriculum Design and Implementation Lab S 1 credit
The student will apply and practice knowledge that was taught in EDEC281, such as how to create developmentally appropriate curriculum, content, and methods. The student will complete 45 hours of supervised lab with a coach at a licensed childcare facility, center, or Head Start. Co-requisite: EDEC281.

EDEC291 Special Topics in EC F/S variable
Courses not required in any curriculum, for which there is a particular need, or given on a trial basis to determine demand.

EDEC292 Independent Study F/S variable
These courses are directed research or study on an individual basis. Requires the consent of the instructor.


Economics
ECNS201 Principles of Microeconomics F 3 credits – Core III
The micro approach to economics provides a view of the internal workings of an economy in terms of the market structure, pricing and production decisions, resource allocation, and income distribution. This course and ECNS202 may be taken in any order.

ECNS202 Principles of Macroeconomics S 3 credits – Core III
The macro approach to economics provides a broad view of the entire economy in terms of various economic systems and markets, the role of government, and the interaction of the public and private sector. This course and ECNS201 may be taken in any order.

ECNS294 Workshop F/S variable
These are concentrated class sessions on topics for which a particular need has been determined.

ECNS291 Special Topics F/S variable
Courses not required in any curriculum, for which there is a particular need, or given on a trial basis to determine demand.

ECNS292 Independent Study F/S variable
These courses are directed research or study on an individual basis. Requires the consent of the instructor.


Education
EDU200 Introduction to Education F/S 2 credits
This course introduces the student to teaching as a profession. It includes the historical, philosophical, social, and psychological foundations of education. Emphasis is placed on the American public school with its breadth of social diversity and technological advancements. Discussion includes the purpose of education, trends and issues in education today and personal attributes required to be a teacher in today’s multicultural and changing world.

EDU202 Early Field Experience F/S 2 credits
Prerequisite: EDU200 with a grade of C or better. This course provides an opportunity for a student who is pursuing the field of education to experience teaching/learning situations. Students complete field experience through observation, aide work, individual tutoring and analysis of the teaching-learning experience in an elementary or secondary classroom. The student completes 45 hours of supervised volunteer field experience in a school setting and attends a one hour weekly seminar on campus.

EDU231 Literature and Literacy for Children F 3 credits – Core VI
This course is a survey of literature for preschool through middle school children. It covers the historical background, genres, literary characteristics, and evaluative criteria for selection of quality books for children. Instructional materials and activities to integrate children’s literature into the classroom will be demonstrated. Extensive reading and responding to quality children’s literature will be required.

EDU270 Instructional Technology (equivalent to EDU370) S 3 credits
Prerequisite: CAPP131 or consent of instructor. This course is intended as an introductory computer and multimedia course for students who want to become teachers, as well as for those already teaching who wish to increase their technology and multimedia skills in the classroom. Students will finish the course with a solid understanding of educational technology, including how to use computers and communications networks, integrating multimedia and educational software applications, how to access and evaluate information on the World Wide Web, security and ethical issues, and how to integrate computers and educational technology into classroom curriculum.

EDU291 Special Topics F/S variable
Courses not required in any curriculum, for which there is a particular need, or given on a trial basis to determine demand.

EDU292 Independent Study F/S variable
These courses are directed research or study on an individual basis. Requires the consent of the instructor.

EDU294 Workshop F/S variable
These are concentrated class sessions on a topic for which a particular need has been identified.


Education: Special (Special Education)
EDSP204 Intro to Teaching Exceptional Learners S 3 credits
This course provides students with an introduction to the study of persons who are handicapped by blindness, mental retardation, learning disabilities or other crippling conditions. The problems and methods by which the human services professional can assist them to live a full life are reviewed and discussed.


Emergency Care Provider
ECP100 First Aid and CPR F/S 1 credit
This is the Red Cross course in emergency treatment and care of injuries. Certificates will be earned. Additional fee required. 


Engineering: General
EGEN101 Introduction to Engineering Calculations and Problem Solving S 3 credits
An introduction to engineering calculations and problem solving using the computer. Students are taught how to solve and present engineering problems using computer applications such as spreadsheets, graphic programs, and database programs. In addition, an introduction to engineering design is presented and a small design project completed. Co-requisite: M121 or M141 or instructor permission. Additional fee required.

EGEN105 Intro to General Engineering F 1 credit
A survey of engineering disciplines, as well as skills and learning strategies needed to be successful in an engineering curriculum.

EGEN194/294 Workshop F/S variable
Concentrated class sessions on a topic for which a particular need has been identified.

EGEN201 Engineering Mechanics-Statics F 3 credits
Prerequisite: PH227. This course will develop basic engineering concepts used in analyzing rigid bodies, such as vectors, moments, couples, center of gravity, and center of pressure of stationary bodies.

EGEN202 Engineering Mechanics-Dynamics S 3 credits
Prerequisite: PH227 and EG231. This course will develop basic engineering concepts of moving bodies, including kinematics, and kinetics of particles and rigid bodies, including: position, velocity, acceleration, moving frames of reference, Newton’s laws, conservation of energy and momentum, impact, and an introduction to vibrations.

EGEN291 Special Topics F/S variable
Courses not required in any curriculum, for which there is a particular need, or given on a trial basis to determine demand.

EGEN292 Independent Study F/S variable
These courses are directed research or study on an individual basis. Requires the consent of the instructor.


Engineering Technology
ET100 Computer Applications in Technology and Science F 3 credits
Students will be introduced to the use of scientific calculators, and computer applications typically used in fields of science and engineering.

ET101 Tools, Measurement and Safety F 3 credits
This course will cover identification and proper use of both hand and power tools associated with the content of this program. While safety will be an important part of every course, the issue will be examined in greater depth within this course. Specific topics will include shop and field safety, equipment and tool safety, welding safety, personal safety devices, farm rescue, and associated topics.

ET103 Workplace Safety S 3 credits
An overview of general job site safety procedures including an overview of OSHA regulations. The student will also be introduced to regulatory reporting requirements for health and safety including the preparation of site safety plans.

ET104 Field Methods S 2 credits
Introduction to basic field equipment, how to make field notes and keep a field book. Students will also be introduced to basic field safety.

ET110 Electricity AC/DC F 3 credits
This course is designed to provide a fundamental knowledge of the theory, operation, and safety related to both industrial and low voltage applications. Students will learn about high voltage, high amperage power and low voltage current. Basic operating characteristics of motors, regulators, and controls found in agricultural machinery will also be covered. Study will cover farm power from voltage three phase down to 12 volt DC ag machinery.

ET123 Introduction to GPS F/S 1 credit
Students will learn how Global Positioning Systems work, applications for GPS in science, industry, recreation, and agriculture. Students will learn how to use a GPS to mark way-points, navigate, and locate.

ET124 Advanced GPS S 1 credit
Prerequisite: ET120 or consent of instructor. Students will learn how to interface a hand-held GPS receiver with a computer by downloading GPS information to commercially available software, and how to use computer maps to identify locations and then use a GPS to field locate those places.

ET130 Surveying I F 3 credits
Covers the basics of plane surveying. Linear measurement, errors, leveling, the use of transit, theodolite and total stations to make traverses, traverse adjustments, earthworks, and map construction. An introduction to GPS surveying.

ET131 Surveying II S 3 credits
Prerequisite: ET130. This class introduces students to the history, and principles of public land survey system, legal descriptions, easements, and conveyances. Students will learn the fundamentals of legal boundary location and the identification of property corners and their monumentation. Students will be working both in the classroom and numerous locations around the county.

ET189/289 Workshop F/S variable
Concentrated class sessions on a topic for which a particular need has been identified.

ET197/297 Engineering Technology Internship/Seminar On demand variable

ET198/298
Prerequisite: Completion of 20 credits towards an A.A.S. in engineering technology or consent of instructor. Students enrolled in the engineering technology program can earn up to ten credits for work experience with approved agencies. Students work under the supervision of an instructor who will determine the number of credits to be earned based on the number of working hours and work responsibility. Students may be required to attend an internship seminar for the purpose of coordinating and discussing the internship experience. In general, 45 hours of internship work, including the seminar, is equivalent to one credit hour.

ET200 Project Management F 3 credits
How to read and prepare contract documents, estimating, managing financial and human resources, and preparing legal and regulatory documents.

ET210 Electronics S 3 credits
Prerequisite: ET110. This course is designed to provide the student with a basic understanding of electronics in a wide range of applications. Circuit components and their function will be covered along with the interconnection of electronic components. Study will include power supply switches, relays, regulators, wiring, capacitors, resistors, and indicators. A major focus of the course will be on circuit logic, troubleshooting, and repair.

ET280 Special Topics F/S variable
Courses not required in any curriculum, for which there is a particular need, or given on a trial basis to determine demand.

ET290 Individual Problems F/S variable
These courses are directed research or study on an individual basis. Requires the consent of the instructor.


Environmental Sciences
ENSC105 Environmental Science S 3 credits – Core IV
This course is a study of the environment, its components, and how human activity relates to the environment. This course will provide students the knowledge to make a positive impact through skills in critical thinking, knowledge of the scientific basis of environmental issues, and the impacts of politics and economics on environmental issues. Students will be encouraged to develop habits of sustainable living in the modern world, and to become actively involved A special effort will be made to show how natural resources may be conserved. Included in the course are studies of energy, human populations, pollution, soils, water, range-land, forests, wildlife, air, wastes, and general ecological principles.


Equine Horsemanship
EQUH110 Western Equitation F/S 3 credits
This course involves gentling and starting a green horse, 2-3 years of age, halter breaking, leading at walk, trotting and backing, handling of feet and legs, feeding, reproduction, and selection practices. Students must have a horse and consent of the instructor. Additional fee required.

EQUH130 Hoof Care Science S 1 credit
This course covers the fundamentals of horseshoeing including proper trimming, corrective trimming and cold shoeing.

EQUH131 Hoof Care Science Lab S 1 credit

EQUH210 Intermediate Western Equitation F/S 3 credits
Prerequisite: EQUH110. A continuation of EQUH110. Starting the horse on a bit (snaffle or hackamore), driving, backing, lunging and ground work, advanced horse management practices, anatomy, physiology and training practices. Student must have a horse. Additional fee required.

EQUH230 Prof Hoof Care Provider I S 1 credit
This course covers horseshoeing and corrective shoeing techniques, including the development of corrective shoes.

EQUH231 Prof Hoof Care Provider I Lab S 1 credit

EQUH253 Starting Colts F/S 2 credits
Prerequisite: EQUH210. This is a class designed for both horse and rider. The rider must be significantly advanced to maintain a secure seat at a lope. There will be special emphasis on cueing the horse with hands, legs, weight, and voice. The student must have a horse. Additional fee required.

EQUH256 Developing the Young Horse F/S 2 credits
Prerequisite: EQUH253. This is a class designed for experienced students and horses. There will be special emphasis on advanced reining, collection, headset lead changes, side passes, pivots, and roll backs. The student must have a horse. Additional fee required.


Equine Science
EQUS150 Equine Production F 3 credits
A major objective of this course is the development of an understanding of the production and management techniques necessary for the successful operation of the horse enterprise. Management practices concerned with feeding, breeding, and health programs receive considerable attention. Age determination, breeding, health care, unsoundness, way of going, nutrient needs, parasite control, buildings, and equipment are among the many specific areas covered. Students will cover material related to preventative equine medicine and methods associate with such care.


Geoscience: Geography
GPHY111 Introduction to Physical Geography F 3 credits – Core IV
An introductory course in Physical Geography, the course will cover a study of the lithosphere, atmosphere, hydrosphere, and biosphere to develop an understanding how the earth is physically structured and how it got that way. Co-requisite: GPHY112.

GPHY112 Introduction to Physical Geography Laboratory F 1 credit – Core IV
The lab component of the course will be used to emphasize and demonstrate principles and concepts developed during the lecture. Co-requisite: GPHY111.

GPHY141 Geography of World Regions S 3 credits – Core III or Core VI
Prerequisite: College level writing skills on the COMPASS test or WRIT101. This is a course emphasizing the development of global awareness as it applies to the current events of the day. Students will be introduced to the various regions of the globe, with a focus on areas outside Anglo-America. Major writing projects are required.

GPHY180 Introduction to GIS F 3 credits
The student is introduced to the various software packages used in GIS. Applications of these packages include natural resources, marketing, and government.

GPHY194/294 Workshop F/S variable
These are concentrated class sessions on a topic for which a particular need has been identified.

GPHY291 Special Topics F/S variable
Courses not required in any curriculum, for which there is a particular need, or given on a trial basis to determine demand.

GPHY292 Independent Study F/S variable
These courses are directed research or study on an individual basis. Requires the consent of the instructor.


Geoscience: Geology
GEO101 Introduction to Physical Geology S 3 credits – Core IV
This is an introductory course in Physical Geology. The course will cover Plate tectonics, geologic structures, earthquakes, geologic history, the rock cycle, basic mineralogy, and geographic land-forms. Co-requisite: GEO102.

GEO102 Introduction to Physical Geology Laboratory S 1 credit – Core IV
The lab component of the course will be used to emphasize and demonstrate principles and concepts developed during the lecture. Co-requisite: GEO101.

GEO111 Dinosaurs 3 credits – Core IV
This course provides an introduction to dinosaur paleontology. Students will learn how hypotheses about extinct animals are formulated and tested, with comparisons to modern sedimentary environments and living animals. Recitation sections allow discussion of current research and hands-on experience with sedimentary rocks and fossils.

GEO125 Intro to Dinosaur Paleontology Sum 3 credits – Core IV
This class provides an introduction to dinosaur paleontology with an emphasis on field work. Students will perform real world dinosaur paleontology and look at fossil evidence for one of the most dramatic events in Earth history: the extinction event at the end of the time of the dinosaurs. Students will gain an understanding of regional geology, fossil animals, plants and sedimentary environments of eastern Montana. This class will consist of both a classroom and field component. Students will be involved in field excavation, fossil preparation and analysis, and the basics of field geology including stratigraphy and mapping. Extensive hiking and outdoor physical challenges require that students be physically fit. Co-requisite: GEO126

GEO126 Intro to Dinosaur Paleontology Sum 1 credit – Core IV
Lab component to accompany lecture. Co-requisite: GEO125.

GEO194/294 Workshop F/S variable
Concentrated class sessions on a topic for which a particular need has been identified.

GEO211 Earth History and Evolution On demand 3 credits
This is a general course in Geology that emphasizes the historical time-line of the geologic events in earth’s history, and the development of those theories. The course will cover the early evolution of the earth, plate tectonics and continent formation, the history of life on earth, and the geologic record. Co-requisite: GEO212.

GEO212 Earth History and Evolution Laboratory On demand 1 credit
The lab component of the course will be used to emphasize and demonstrate principles and concepts developed during the lecture. Co-requisite: GEO211.

GEO291 Special Topics F/S variable
Courses not required in any curriculum, for which there is a particular need, or given on a trial basis to determine demand.

GEO292 Independent Study F/S variable
These courses are directed research or study on an individual basis. Requires the consent of the instructor.


Graphic Design
GDSN200 Intro to Desktop Publishing F 3 credits
Prerequisite: CAPP131 or consent of instructor. This course introduces the use of page layout software and design principles to create effective business documents such as ads, business cards, brochures and newsletters.

GDSN231 Graphic Design Applications F 3 credits
Prerequisite: CAPP131 or CA125. This course introduces the use of imaging and drawing tools to create and modify graphics and photographic images used in desktop publishing and web page design.

GDSN250 Graphic Design I S 3 credits
Prerequisite: CA140 and CA141 or consent of instructor. This introductory production/lecture class focuses on developing design skills utilizing raster and vector graphic software tools. Graphic Design I examines the elements and principles of design, and explores the composition, components, and concepts critical to effective graphic design. Students will practice making informed decisions concerning the aesthetic application of these precepts with a comprehensive series of original graphic design projects.


Health Enhancement
HEE160 Basketball Techniques F 2 credits
This course involves analysis and instruction in individual and team play. It includes principles of training and conditioning, selection of individuals, and development of performance for each position. History, coaching philosophy, coaching methods and problems, fundamentals of offensive and defensive team play, comparison of systems, rules, and strategy are covered.

HEE220 Introduction to Physical Education S 3 credits
This course will provide the student an opportunity to gain a basic understanding of various fields of physical education. It will allow the student to understand career opportunities in the fields of physical education, health, recreation, and sports, while gaining knowledge of the history, trends, and objectives of physical education.


History: American
HSTA101 American History I F 3 credits – Core III
This course treats developments in American history from the earliest colonial beginnings through the period of Reconstruction. It follows the processes of colonial settlement, the growth of self-government in the English colonies, the which beset the British empire during the years 1763-1775, the American Revolution, the creation of a new government under a federal constitution, the growth of political parties, Westward expansion, hardened definitions of nationalism presented by the breakdown of the democratic process, and the Civil War and Reconstruction.

HSTA102 American History II S 3 credits – Core III
This course begins by emphasizing the problems after Reconstruction, the new industrialism, the last frontier, and agrarian discontent. Attention is focused next upon overseas expansion and the Progressive Era. Later topics include the approach to and participation in World War I, the problems of prosperity during the “normalcy” of the 1920s, the depression and the New Deal, the role of the United States in World War II, the Cold War at home and abroad, the politics and culture of reform in the postwar era, the Vietnam war, the conservative ascendancy of the 1970s and 1980s, and a view of America in the 1990s. The course covers the social, economic, and political developments within the United States as well as its diplomatic history in the period of its emergence as a leading world power.

HSTA111 American Civil Rights Movement F 1 credit
The civil rights movement is one of the most significant sources of social change in the United States during the 20th Century. This course analyzes the structure and dynamics of the civil rights movement from the viewpoints of history, sociology, and political science. Focus is placed on the roles of organizations, resources, leadership, recruitment, commitment, values, ideology, political culture, gender, and counter-movements.

HSTA160 Introduction to the American West S 3 credits – Core III
This course focuses on the growth and development of the American West as a culture, economy, and society.

HSTA194/294 Workshop F/S variable
These are concentrated class sessions on a topic for which a particular need has been identified.

HSTA215 Post World War II America F/S 3 credits
This lecture/discussion course examines and analyzes the development of the United States from 1945 to the present. Attention is given to the political, social, intellectual, cultural, and economic changes in American society. Included as areas of inquiry will be the impact of the Cold War on foreign and domestic policies and society; the effect of social protest movements on society; the interconnected influence of economic, demographic, and cultural changes on policy and society; the expansion and contraction of the social welfare state; the ways that the Vietnam conflict, emergence of multiculturalism, and the new environmentalism have shaped contemporary policy and attitudes, and the pervasive and lasting influence of mass culture, technology and media.

HSTA235 Civil War and Reconstruction S 3 credits
This course will trace the history of the American Civil War from the introduction of slavery into the colonies to the end of Reconstruction in 1876. Of special significance will be the institution of slavery in the North and South, and how the slaves lived in urban and rural areas. The emergence of sectionalism and the breakdown of the political consensus that led to war and the attempts to avoid war through several political compromises will also be addressed. The major military campaigns, leaders, and battles will be studied. Formerly HI210 American Civil War

HSTA250 Plains Indian History S 3 credits – Core VI
This course is a study of the Plains Indians from their earliest beginnings to the present. It details the rise and development of Plains Indian societies, nomadic and village dwellers; the contact and conflict with Euro-Americans; the challenges faced by the Plains Indians to their traditional way of life during the early reservation years; and the struggle by the Plains Indians to retain tribal sovereignty, politics and culture.

HSTA255 Montana History S 3 credits
An introductory and interpretive history from Lewis and Clark to present. The course emphasizes the activities of economic and political groups in a study of the land and people of Montana.

HSTA291 Special Topics F/S variable
This variable title course deals with broad historical topics that transcend and telescope traditional analytical, chronological, and geographical boundaries. Content will vary with the instructors teaching the course.

HSTA292 Individual Problems F/S variable
These courses are directed research or study on an individual basis. Requires the consent of the instructor.


History: Western and World
HSTR101 Western Civilization I F 3 credits – Core III
This is an introductory survey of the origins and characteristics of “western” cultures and societies, meaning those from the Mediterranean and spreading up to the Baltic Sea, to 1648. After a short introduction to the bronze and early iron ages, the course emphasizes the classical era when Greek and Roman cultures fanned out through the regions, through the Middle Ages, and finishes with the Early Modern period when new states, new religious sects, and developments in technology, learning, and trade transformed the medieval world.

HSTR102 Western Civilization II S 3 credits – Core III
This course is an introductory survey of the development of European societies in their global context since the 1648. It presents persons, events, ideas and institutions that have shaped the “Western World” from the 17th through the 20th centuries. In studying the interrelated histories of southern, eastern, northern, and western Europe, students learn the foundations of modern western identities that developed within and in juxtaposition to a world increasingly globalized via trade, religion, colonization, war, and social movements.

HSTR140 Modern Asia F/S 3 credits – Core VI
This course introduces Modern East Asian history through the voices of those who made it. As a broad survey of Asian history from 1600 to the present, it examines the major developments, institutions, and forces that shaped the identity of multiple Asian cultures. It explores topics including empire-building, economic expansion, nationalism, popular culture, and gender.

HSTR160 Modern World History S 3 credits – Core VI
This survey of world history since 1900 examines major historical events around the globe and explores general themes such as tradition and modernity, war and peace, political revolutions and socioeconomic change, the role of values and culture in historical development, and the complex relationship between the individual and society.

HSTR194/294 Workshop F/S variable
These are concentrated class sessions on a topic for which a particular need has been identified.

HSTR250 The Irish F/S 3 credits
This course is a comprehensive overview of Irish history from prehistoric period through the 20th century. It examines the coming of Christianity (and writing), the invasions of Vikings and Anglo-Normans, the final subjugation of Ireland in the early 17th century and domination of native Ireland by Britain, the Great Famine and its consequences, Home Rule, partition and “the Troubles.”

HSTR272 Terrorism: Violence in the Modern World F/S 3 credits – Core VI
This course examines the rise and spread of terrorism in the modern world, from the French Revolution to the present. It encompasses an examination of the origins and root causes of terrorism and the impact of terrorism on organized societies.

HSTR282 Darwinian Revolution F/S 3 credits
This course will focus on the conceptual developments leading to the establishment of the major unifying paradigm of biological science, the theory of evolution by natural selection.

HSTR286 World Religions and Society F 3 credits – Core VI
This course offers an investigation of world religions in their social, political, and cultural contexts. The course offers a comparative perspective on Western and non-Western religious beliefs and practices.

HSTR291 Special Topics F/S variable
Courses not required in any curriculum, for which there is a particular need, or given on a trial basis to determine demand.

HSTR292 Individual Problems F/S variable
These courses are directed research or study on an individual basis. Requires the consent of the instructor.


Human Services
HS194/294 Workshop F/S variable
These are concentrated class sessions on a topic for which a particular need has been identified. Formerly HS189/289. MUS Update Spring 2012

HS200 Motivational Interviewing S 3 credits
The art of interviewing is explored using Miller and Rollnick’s motivational interviewing. Communicating to raise motivational levels for change are examined.

HS291 Special Topics F/S variable
Courses not required in any curriculum, for which there is a particular need, or given on a trial basis to determine demand. Formerly HS280

HS290 Individual Problems F/S variable
These courses are directed research or study on an individual basis. Requires the consent of the instructor.


Interdisciplinary Studies
ID101 College Learning and Survival Skills (C.L.A.S.S) F/S 2 credits
This course is designed for students to identify their learning style – how they learn – and to develop their existing reading skills. It will emphasize college course study and college survival skills such as note taking, effective listening, test taking, and healthy living.

ID121/122 Self Esteem Group F/S variable
ID123/124
Prerequisite: consent of instructor. A self-improvement experience meant to increase the student’s awareness and acceptance of his/her personal strengths and limitations. The purpose of this course is to increase the student’s self-esteem through participation in structured and unstructured group activities.

ID131 Lifeskills F/S 3 credits
Information covered within the Lifeskills class includes seeing available choices and taking responsibility for the choices made. The many topics covered include education and college choices, personal finances (wants vs. needs), buying a home, investing, stock market, mutual funds, compounding interest, individual retirement accounts (specifically Roth), physical care regarding sleep, diet, exercise, and habits such as alcohol, drugs and tobacco. Social skills will be addressed based on Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs. Relationships and perspectives within relationships will be discussed and positive social activities will be learned. They include dancing and the card game called whist. Male vs. female perspectives regarding sex will be discussed. Career choices and entrepreneur options will be addressed from the perspective of talents and desires. Class members are required to journal and keep daily food and money diaries.

ID189/289 Workshop F/S variable
These are concentrated class sessions on a topic for which a particular need has been identified.

ID280 Special Topics F/S variable
Courses not required in any curriculum, for which there is a particular need, or given on a trial basis to determine demand.

ID290 Individual Problems F/S variable
These courses are directed research or study on an individual basis. Requires the consent of the instructor.


Journalism
JO105 Introduction to Journalism F/S 3 credits
Prerequisite: WRIT101 or consent of instructor. This course introduces the student to modern print journalism. This is instruction and practice in reporting and writing news articles.

JO115/215 Viewbook F/S variable
Hours are arranged with the instructor so that students enrolled in this course can complete an annual Viewbook funded by ASB. Training is offered in the use of computers and digital scanners. PageMaker software, photography and use of a digital camera, and page design and layout are studied. Though experience in these areas is desired, no experience is necessary to enroll.

JO189/289 Workshop F/S variable
Concentrated class sessions on a topic for which a particular need has been identified.

JO280 Special Topics F/S variable
Courses not required in any curriculum, for which there is a particular need, or given on a trial basis to determine demand.

JO290 Individual Problems F/S variable
These courses are directed research or study on an individual basis. Requires the consent of the instructor.


Liberal Studies and Humanities
LSH101 Introduction to Humanities-Contemporary F 3 credits – Core II, Category II
This course offers an examination of art, literature, philosophy, and music and their interrelationships in the Western world during the 19th and 20th centuries up to the present day.

LSH105 Introduction to Mideast Culture F/S 3 credits
This course is a thematic introduction to the Middle East through examination of its geography, ethnicities, nationalities, cultures, art, literature, architecture, religions, history, politics, and economy.

LSH151 Introduction to Biblical Humanities F/S 3 credits
this course is an introduction to the historical and anthropological contexts from which the biblical writings emerged and also to the internal structure of the Bible. Attention will be given to the emergence from ancient Hebrew writings of what we call “Judaism” and to the later appropriation of the Hebrew Scriptures by radicalized, Greek-speaking Jews, who called themselves “Christians.”  Themes of the course include the invention of the concept of God, the invention of the related concept of history, the invention of the concept of the city (or rather, of two cities, that of the devil and that of God), and the three-way struggle between Judaism, Christianity and Islam. The principal aim of the course is to read through the Bible, learning its principal divisions, its organizing images, its chief characters and stories, and its ideas about history, sin, faith, salvation, uncleanness, the fall of kingdoms and the end of the world.

LSH161 Introduction to Asian Humanities F/S 3 credits
Examines dominant ideas and arts in South and East Asian cultures expressed in philosophy, literature, art, architecture, and music. It covers the period from the earliest civilization to present.

LSH194/294 Workshop F/S variable
Concentrated class sessions on a topic for which a particular need has been identified.

LSH291 Special Topics F/S variable
Courses not required in any curriculum, for which there is a particular need, or given on a trial basis to determine demand.

LSH292 Independent Study F/S variable
These courses are directed research or study on an individual basis. Requires the consent of the instructor.


Literature
LIT110 Introduction to Lit F/S 3 credits – Core II, Category II
This course is designed for students who wish to improve their understanding of “basic” literature. A multi-genre course, the class consists of considerations of short fiction, poetry, and drama by surveying their histories and developments. Students will read appropriate examples of each type. College-level reading and writing skills are required.

LIT210 American Lit I F 3 credits – Core II, Category II
This course surveys the major literary works by authors from the earliest period of American history through the Transcendentalists and up to the emergence of modern American literature. College-level reading and writing skills are required.

LIT211 American Lit II S 3 credits – Core II, Category II
This course surveys major literary works by American authors from the emergence of modern American literature, including the Realists and Regionalists, to the present. College-level reading and writing skills are required.

LIT223 British Lit I F 3 credits – Core II, Category II
This course surveys selected works by major British writers through Pre-Romanticism. The emphasis is placed on major periods and trends – the Anglo-Saxon Period, the Middle Ages, Renaissance, Neoclassicism, and Pre-Romanticism. College-level reading and writing skills are required.

LIT224 British Lit II S 3 credits – Core II, Category II
This course continues that begun in LIT223. Students study selected major 19th and 20th century writers from the Romantics and Victorians to the present. College-level reading and writing skills are required.

LIT285 Mythologies S 3 credits – Core II, Category II or Core VI
This course is a study of the cultural implications of myth. Readings will include selections from various cultures and time periods. Students will examine several myths as literary epics and as illustrations of value systems.

LIT291 Special Topics F/S variable
Courses not required in any curriculum, for which there is a particular need, or given on a trial basis to determine demand.

LIT292 Independent Study F/S variable
These courses are directed research or study on an individual basis. Requires the consent of the instructor.


Mathematics
M090 Introductory Algebra F/S 3 credits
Prerequisite: Math Placement Test, or consent of instructor. This course is designed for those students needing preparation for Intermediate Algebra or Math for Liberal Arts. The material to be presented includes a review of arithmetic, the real number system, algebraic expressions and equations, problem solving, graphing, exponents, and polynomials, factoring, rational expressions and equations, and radical expressions and equations.

M095 Intermediate Algebra F/S 3 credits
Prerequisites: “C-” or better in M90, Math Placement Test, or consent of instructor. This course is a continuation of the material covered in Introductory Algebra (M90). Topics to be covered include graphing and the Cartesian Coordinate system, rational expressions, radicals and rational exponents, quadratic equations, quadratic inequalities, functions, and exponential/logarithmic equations and functions.

M108 Business Mathematics F 3 credits
This course is an applied mathematics course for Business students. Topics covered include payroll, mathematics of buying and selling, simple and compound interest calculations, annuities, business and consumer loan calculations, and other problems common in business. A special emphasis is placed on time value of money concepts.

M111 Technical Mathematics F/S 3 credits
Prerequisite: “C-” or better in M90 or equivalent. Introduction to applied mathematics in technical fields. This course will show how basic arithmetic processes using whole numbers, fractions, decimals, and percentages are used to make and convert measurements in different units and notations and solve simple mathematical relationships. Students will also be shown how to calculate geometric quantities, and utilize graphs and charts to record and summarize data.

M114 Extended Technical Mathematics F/S 2 credits
Prerequisite: “C-” or better in M95 or M111 or consent of instructor. This course is a continuation of M111 and will introduce more advanced topics in applied math. This course will introduce how to organize and interpret data generated by exponential and logarithmic functions, estimating area and volume of complex geometrical objects, calculations using trigonometric functions, polar coordinates, and basic statistical concepts.

M121 College Algebra F/S 4 credits – Core V
Prerequisite: “C-” or better in M95, Math Placement Test, advanced high school algebra, or consent of instructor. This is a continuation of the material presented in Intermediate Algebra. The material will also include conics, functions, logarithms, complex numbers, inverse functions, exponents, induction, sequences and series.

M130 Mathematics for Elementary Teachers I F 4 credits – Core V
Prerequisite: “C-” or better in M95 or equivalent, Math Placement Test, or consent of instructor. This sequence gives an understanding of math for teaching elementary grades today. It includes problem solving, sets, functions, numeration systems, and number theory.

M131 Math for Elementary Teachers II S 4 credits – Core V
Prerequisite: “C-” or better in M95 or equivalent, Math Placement Test, or consent of instructor. The second course in the sequence gives an understanding of math for teaching elementary grades today and includes probability, statistics, and an intuitive approach to geometry.

M145 Mathematics for the Liberal Arts F/S 3 credits – Core V
Prerequisite: “C-” or better in M95, Math Placement Test or consent of instructor. This course applies mathematics to a variety of disciplines. It is designed for non-math/science majors. It includes matrices and applications to systems of linear equations; applications to the natural sciences, social sciences, and games. There is an introduction to financial mathematics, sets, counting theorems, elementary probability, and statistics.

M151 Precalculus S 4 credits – Core V
Prerequisite: “C-” or better in M95, 3-4 years of college preparatory math, Math Placement Test, or consent of instructor. This course is an in-depth examination of functions and inverse functions including algebraic and trigonometric functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, rational functions, and conic sections. This course is designed for those students who have had college preparatory classes in high school and whose placement test indicates a need to improve on those skills that are necessary to be successful in a calculus class.

M171 Calculus I F 5 credits – Core V
Prerequisite: “C-” or better in MA121 or M151, Math Placement Test, or consent of instructor. This is the first semester of a two-semester sequence. The course will cover functions, limits and properties of limits, derivatives and applications of derivatives, and an introduction to integration.

M172 Calculus II S 5 credits – Core V
Prerequisite: “C-” or better in M171, or consent of instructor. This is the second semester of a two-semester sequence. The course will cover integration techniques, logarithmic, exponential, and other transcendental functions, infinite series, conic sections, plane curves, parametric equations, and polar coordinates.

M194/294 Workshop F/S variable
These are concentrated class session on topic for which a particular need has been determined.

M273 Multivariable Calculus F/demand variable
Prerequisite: “C-” or better in M172, or consent of instructor. This course includes the study of topics in two and three dimensional geometry. The study of vectors and vector-valued functions, functions of several variables, partial derivatives, double and triple integrals, and vector calculus.

M291 Special Topics F/S variable
Courses not required in any curriculum, for which there is a particular need, or given on a trial basis to determine demand.

M292 Independent Study F/S variable
These courses are directed research or study on an individual basis. Requires the consent of the instructor.


Music
Group performance courses may be repeated. Private lessons are individually designed for the student, beginning with the 100 level and building on each individual’s skills through the 200 level. The student must meet course competencies to progress to the next level.

MUSI101 Enjoyment of Music S 3 credits – Core II, Category II or Core VI
This course is designed to develop informed, perceptive listening and musical understanding, examination of language and forms of music, styles, and genres of the Middle Ages, Renaissance, Baroque, Classical, Romantic, and Contemporary Age. Non-western cultures covered include, but are not limited to: African, African American, Chinese, Japanese, Jewish, Native American, Balinese, Latin American, Middle Eastern, and East Indian.

MUSI103 Fundamentals of Musical Creation F 3 credits – Core II, Category I or Category II or Core VI
This course is designed to develop music reading and performance skills, including rhythm, melody, harmony, form, pitch, tempo, dynamics, phrasing, expression, and timbre. Focus includes, but is not limited to, that of Western culture.

MUSI105 Music Theory I S 3 credits
Prerequisite: MUSI103 or consent of instructor. This course involves study of harmony in common practice, musical notation and interaction of the elements of music in harmony and counterpoint including, but not limited to, that of Western culture. Students will have the opportunity to gain hands-on experience in using Finale and digital recording equipment in the arrangement and composition processes.

MUSI106 Music Theory II F 3 credits – Core II, Category II
Prerequisite: MUSI105 or consent of instructor. This course involves a study of harmony in common practice, musical notation and interaction of the elements of music in harmony and counterpoint including, but not limited to, that of Western culture. Students will have the opportunity to gain hands-on experience in using Finale and digital recording equipment in the arrangement and composition processes.

MUSI112 Choir: Dawson F/S 1 credit – Core II, Category I
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Performance training in vocal literature. Vocal ensembles of various genres with performance at community and college events. May be repeated. Additional fee required.

MUSI114 Band: Dawson F 1 credit – Core II, Category I
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Instrumental ensembles of various genres with performance at community, sporting and college events. May be repeated.

MUSI115 Drumline I F 1 credit – Core II, Category I
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Instrumental ensembles of various genres with performance at community, sporting and college events. May be repeated.

MUSI135 Keyboard Skills I F 1 credit – Core II, Category I
Study of keyboard theory and technique, chords, scales, sight reading, and piano repertoire. May be repeated. Additional fee required.

MUSI136 Keyboard Skills II S 1 credit – Core II, Category I
Study of keyboard theory and technique, chords, scales, sight reading, and piano repertoire. Continuation of MUSI135. May be repeated. Additional fee required.

MUSI140 Aural Perception I S 2 credits
Prerequisite: MUSI103 or consent of instructor. This course is designed for students interested in the development of ear training skills. The student will gain a good understanding of the basic practices of sight-reading and melodic and harmonic dictation. The student will gain the confidence needed to mentally hear the music previously unknown to him or her. These skills will improve their performance skills, both instrumentally and vocally. This class is required of music majors and minors, and may be required of students in a music option. Students should check the catalog of their transferring institution.

MUSI141 Aural Perception II F 2 credits
Prerequisite: MUSI140 or consent of instructor. This course involves study in ear training and sight singing to develop aural perception of tonal and temporal relationships.

MUSI147 Choral Ensemble: Dawson S 1 credit – Core II, Category I
Prerequisite: Successful Audition. Performance in small instrumental and/or vocal ensembles. May be repeated.

MUSI150 Beginning Voice F 1 credit – Core II, Category I
Basic singing technique: tone production, interpretation, introduction to song literature, and solo and ensemble performance. May be repeated. Additional fee required.

MUSI151 Beginning Voice II S 1 credit – Core II, Category I
Basic singing technique: tone production, interpretation, introduction to song literature, and solo and ensemble performance. Continuation of MUSI150. May be repeated. Additional fee required.

MUSI160 Beginning Guitar F 1 credit – Core II, Category I
Basic instruction in techniques of chord and music reading, classical guitar, tablature, and solo and ensemble performance. May be repeated. Additional fee required.

MUSI194 Seminar/Workshop F/S variable
These are concentrated class sessions on a topic for which a particular need has been identified.

MUSI195 Applied Music I F/S 1/1 credit – Core II, Category I
Individualized lessons. Additional fee required.

MUSI203 American Popular Music F 3 credits – Core II, Category II or Core VI
This course provides an introductory examination of popular music’s roots, history, and its social and political relationships. The context of the class will increase the awareness of the heritage of pop music and appreciation of its diversity, and develop a perception of the underlying kinship of its many styles. Students should check the catalog for transferability at their transferring institution.

MUSI205 Music Theory III S 3 credits
Prerequisite: MUSI106 or consent of instructor. This course involves study of harmony in common practice, musical notation and interaction of the elements of music in harmony and counterpoint, musical analysis, and composition, including, but not limited to, Western culture. Students will have the opportunity to gain hands-on experience in using Finale and digital recording equipment in the arrangement and composition processes.

MUSI206 Music Theory IV F 3 credits
Prerequisite: MUSI205 or consent of instructor. This course involves study of harmony in common practice, musical notation and interaction of the elements of music in harmony and counterpoint, musical analysis, and composition, including, but not limited to, Western culture. Students will have the opportunity to gain hands-on experience in using Finale and digital recording equipment in the arrangement and composition processes.

MUSI212 Choir II: Dawson Choir F/S 1 credit – Core II, Category I
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Performance training in vocal literature. Vocal ensembles of various genres with performance at community and college events.

MUSI214 Band: Dawson S 1 credit – Core II, Category I
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Instrumental ensembles of various genres with performance at community, sporting and college events. May be repeated.

MUSI215 Drumline II S 1 credit – Core II, Category I
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Instrumental ensembles of various genres with performance at community, sporting and college events. May be repeated.

MUSI235 Keyboard Skills III F 1 credit – Core II, Category I
Study of keyboard theory and technique, chords, scales, sight reading, and piano repertoire. Continuation of MUSI136. May be repeated. Additional fee required.

MUSI236 Keyboard Skills IV S 1 credit – Core II, Category I
Study of keyboard theory and technique, chords, scales, sight reading, and piano repertoire. Continuation of MUSI235. May be repeated. Additional fee required.

MUSI240 Aural Perception III S 2 credits
Prerequisite: MUSI141 or consent of instructor. This course involves study in ear training and sight singing to develop aural perception of tonal and temporal relationships.

MUSI241 Aural Perception IV F 2 credits
Prerequisite: MUSI240 or consent of instructor. This course involves study in ear training and sight singing to develop aural perception of tonal and temporal relationships.

MUSI250 Beginning Voice III F 1 credit – Core II, Category I
Basic singing technique: tone production, interpretation, introduction to song literature, and solo and ensemble performance. Continuation of MUSI151. May be repeated. Additional fee required.

MUSI251 Beginning Voice IV S 1 credit – Core II, Category I
Basic singing technique: tone production, interpretation, introduction to song literature, and solo and ensemble performance. Continuation of MUSI250. May be repeated. Additional fee required.

MUSI260 Intermediate Guitar
Lessons in Guitar. Additional fee required.

MUSI262 Chamber Ensembles II: Dawson F 1 credit – Core II, Category I
Prerequisite: Successful Audition. Performance in small instrumental and/or vocal ensembles. May be repeated.

MUSI291 Special Topics/Experimental Courses F/S variable
Courses not required in any curriculum, for which there is a particular need, or given on a trial basis to determine demand.

MUSI292 Independent Study F/S variable
These courses are directed research or study on an individual basis. Requires the consent of the instructor.

MUSI294 Seminar/Workshop F/S variable
These are concentrated class sessions on a topic for which a particular need has been identified.

MUSI295 Applied Music II F/S 1 credit – Core II, Category I
Individualized lessons. Additional fee required.


Music: Education
MUSE220 Intro to Comp App Music Ed F 2 credits
This course examines computer notation software, sound boards, microphone, cables, speakers, and the understanding of how sound is produced. This class will include lecture and hands-on skill development using sound hardware, recording, editing, and notation software.

MUSE 239 Beginning Conducting S 1 credit (Lab)
Prerequisite: MUSI 240 and MUSI 205 and MUSI 235 Co-requisite: MUSI 241 and MUSI 206 and MUSI 236. This course will introduce students to the aural and technical skills necessary to conduct an ensemble. It provides an introduction to practice strategies, issues related to movement and sound and basic conducting technique.


Music: Technology
MUST118 MIDI Sequencing and Notation S 3 credits
Prerequisite: MUST215. The language of MIDI is designed specifically for conveying information about musical performances in a way that a synthesizer receiving them can reconstruct the performance with accuracy. This course develops technical skills to implement MIDI in music performance, composition, audio editing and production.

MUST120 Introduction to Studio Recording S 3 credits
Prerequisite: MUSE220. This course is an introduction to music production, including hands-on studio recording and live performances, editing, and notation.

MUST215 Studio Recording F 3 credits
Prerequisite: MUST120. This course will advance the student’s skills in recording and sound media. Students will also record live performances, advance their knowledge of waveforms and frequencies, develop their own recording style through ear training and a deeper knowledge of the recording process.

MUST291 Special Topics/Experimental Courses F/S variable
Courses not required in any curriculum, for which there is a particular need, or given on a trial basis to determine demand.

MUST292 Independent Study F/S variable
These courses are directed research or study on an individual basis. Requires the consent of the instructor

MUST299 Capstone Project S 3 credits
Students will develop a portfolio of student work encompassing work within their plan of study.


Native American Studies
NASX105 Introduction to Native American Studies F 3 credits – Core III or Core VI
This course presents a general overview of Native American history from the prehistoric period through the 20th century. The course emphasizes socio-cultural, religious, environmental and gender themes as well as important political and economic forces that shape American Indian life.

NASX194/294 Workshop F/S 1-4 credits
These are concentrated class sessions on a topic for which a particular need has been identified.

NASX291 Special Topics F/S variable
Courses not required in any curriculum, for which there is a particular need, or given on a trial basis to determine demand.

NASX292 Independent Study F/S variable
These courses are directed research or study on an individual basis. Requires the consent of the instructor.


Natural Resources Science and Management
NRSM101  Natural Resource Conservation F 3 credits
This course is an overview of soils, water, rangelands and wildlife conservation from the global to the local level. Impacts of human population growth, economics, ethics and agriculture on the sustainability of natural resources will be examined using basic principles of ecology. The application of ecological principles to agriculture and rangeland management will be included. Co-requisite: NRSM102.

NRSM102 Montana Range Plants F 1 credit
The laboratory exercises are designed to relate to the concepts from NRSM101 to rangeland management. Rangeland inventory and classification methods will be reviewed. Sixty common native and introduced plants will be identified in the field and in the classroom.  Co-requisite: NRSM101.


Nutrition

NUTR221 Basic Human Nutrition F/S 3 credits
This course will cover the basic concepts of human nutrition: digestion, absorption and metabolism of basic nutrients and application of these concepts as they relate to various stages of the life cycle.


Outdoor Recreation
REC115 Outdoor Recreational Activities F/S 3 credits
This course is designed to introduce the student to outdoor activities that can be performed and enjoyed by people of all ages and abilities. The course will cover many activities and will work in conjunction with the resources available in the region including Makoshika State Park, the Yellowstone River and Hollecker Lake.


Philosophy
PHL101 Introduction to Philosophy F 3 credits – Core II, Category II
This course introduces significant human questions and emphasizes understanding the meaning and methods of philosophy. It includes the human condition, knowledge, freedom, history, ethics, the future, and religion.

PHL110 Introduction to Ethics S 3 credits – Core II, Category II
Prerequisite: WRIT101. This course examines human life, experience, and thought in order to discover and develop the principles and values for pursuing a more fulfilled existence. Theories designed to justify ethical judgments are applied to a selection of contemporary personal and social issues.

PHL194/294 Workshop F/S variable
Concentrated class sessions on a topic for which a particular need has been identified.

PHL291 Special Topics F/S variable
Courses not required in any curriculum, for which there is a particular need, or given on a trial basis to determine demand.

PHL292 Independent Study F/S variable
These courses are directed research or study on an individual basis. Requires the consent of the instructor.


Photography
PHOT154 Exploring Digital Photography F/S 3 credits – Core II, Category I
Introduces technical and aesthetic ways of creating digital photographic images as artworks. Emphasis is on the production of photographic images, from acquiring them with the digital camera to manipulating them using computer software, such as Adobe Photoshop. Instructor and peer critique of student work is an integral part of the course.
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Physics
PHSX105 Fundamentals of Physical Science F/S 3 credits – Core IV
Prerequisite M095
. This introductory course in physical science covers the fundamental concepts of Earth Science, Chemistry, and Physics. Included are the societal impacts of the physical sciences and their importance to our understanding of the natural world. Though the coverage of topics will emphasize conceptual understanding, basic algebra skills are required. Co-requisite: PHSX106

PHSX106 Fundamentals of Physical Science Laboratory F/S 1 credit – Core IV
Laboratory exercises and experiments to support the topics of PHSX 105. Measurement and gathering of empirical data will be emphasized. Co-requisite: PHSX105

PHSX194/294 Seminar/Workshop F/S variable
These are concentrated class sessions on a topic for which a particular need has been identified.

PHSX205 College Physics I S 3 credits
Prerequisite: M151 or consent of instructor. Introduction to principles of physics. Topics covered include mechanics (such as motion, Newton’s Laws, conservation laws, rotation, material properties, and fluids.

PHSX206 College Physics I Lab S 1 credit
Hands on applications of principles presented in PH200. Emphasis will be on using physical principles to solve problems.

PHSX220 Physics I (w/Calculus) S 3 credits – Core IV
This is the first semester of a calculus-based physics sequence for students of engineering, chemistry, geology, and similar fields of the physical sciences. It includes topics in mechanics (such as motion, Newton’s Laws, conservation laws, and rotation), material properties, and fluids. Co-requisite: M171 and PHSX221.

PHSX221 Physics I Laboratory S 1 credit – Core IV
This is a series of laboratory experiences illustrating and supporting concepts studied in PHSX220. Co-requisite: PHSX220.

PHSX222 Physics II F 3 credits – Core IV
Prerequisite: M171. This is the second semester of a calculus-based physics sequence for students of engineering and the physical sciences. It includes topics in heat, mechanical waves, sound, light, and optics. There are four hours of lecture, two hours of lab per week. Co-requisite: PHSX223.

PHSX223 Physics II Laboratory F 1 credit – Core IV
This is a series of laboratory experiences illustrating and supporting concepts studied in PHSX222. Co-requisite: PHSX222.

PHSX291 Special Topics F/S variable
Courses not required in any curriculum, for which there is a particular need, or given on a trial basis to determine demand.

PHSX292 Independent Study F/S variable
These courses are directed research or study on an individual basis. Requires the consent of the instructor.


Political Science
PSCI194/294 Workshop F/S variable
These are concentrated class sessions on a topic for which a particular need has been identified.

PSCI195 Practicum – Student Government Practicum F/S variable
This course offers practical experience in student body government. The student may obtain a total of four credits. This course does not fulfill the Core III requirements.

PSCI210 Introduction to American Government F 3 credits – Core III
Politics affect all of our lives on a daily basis. Concepts such as “government,” “politics,” “power,” and “democracy” may seem familiar to us but are in fact very complex and multifaceted subjects. The purpose of this course is to provide the student with an overview of the American government at the national level. Topics such as the structure of government and the U.S. Constitution, civil liberties and civil rights, political parties and voting behavior, public opinion and interest groups will be examined and explored in this course.

PSCI260 Introduction to State and Local Government S 3 credits – Core III
During the nineteenth century and the first decade of this century, state governments dominated American government. In the mid-1900’s, the role of the federal government in public policy making expanded to a great extent while the role of state governments diminished. Now, as we are well into the twenty-first century, state and local governments are working once again in a new partnership with the federal government. This course will survey the structure, function, operation, policies and problems of American state and local governments and will provide students with an understanding of the way in which state and local governments function and the place of the states within the American political system.

PSCI291 Special Topics F/S variable
Courses not required in any curriculum, for which there is a particular need, or given on a trial basis to determine demand.

PSCI292 Independent Study F/S variable
These courses are directed research or study on an individual basis. Requires the consent of the instructor.


Psychology
PSYX100 Intro to Psychology F/S 3 credits – Core III
This course is an introduction to the methods of study in psychology, cognitive science, and neuroscience, including an overview of physiological aspects of behavior, sensation, perception, research methodology, statistics, learning principles, motivation, intelligence, cognition, abnormal behavior, personality, therapy, and social psychology.

PSYX182 Stress Management F/S 2 credits
This course provides the student with an overview of the causes and consequences of stress. The emphasis of the course is on management of stress in everyday life. Students will be encouraged to implement the course content on a personal level.

PSYX194/294 Workshop F/S variable
These are concentrated class sessions on a topic for which a particular need has been identified.

PSYX211 Personality and Adjustment S 3 credits
This course examines the stress of change, centering around the concepts of stimuli/stressor like appraisal, emotion and coping. It is designed to give students an accurate overview of the field of psycho-neuroimmunology allowing them the opportunity to gain mastery and control over stress levels in their lives. This course also explores research on successful coping techniques and personality traits that can be developed in pursuit of self-mastery. Students do a project to identify typical stressors in their lives and come up with an implementable plan to cope with them.

PSYX230 Developmental Psychology S 3 credits – Core III
This course is an introduction to the study of physiological and psychological factors of human growth and development from conception through adolescence.

PSYX240 Fundamentals of Abnormal Psychology S/Alt Yr 3 credits
This course examines the disorders (as per the DSM-IV-TR) that commonly occur with the Substance Use Disorders.

PSYX260 Fund of Social Psychology F 3 credits
This course explores social behavior of the individual in the group, linguistic behavior, social perception, motivation and learning. Emphasis is given to the symbolic inter-actionist perspective and the relationship between culture and cognitive processes. Topics include how thoughts, feelings, and behavior of individuals are influenced by the actual, implied, or imagined presence of others.

PSYX272 Educational Psychology F 3 credits – Core III
Prerequisite: PSYX100 or consent of instructor. This course focuses on the educational application of psychology to instruction and classroom management. It covers such topics as the principles, concepts and implications of learning from classical, operant, social learning and cognitive learning theories. It also focuses on cognitive development, structuring knowledge and instructional management, motivation, discipline and the evaluation of learning.

PSYX291 Special Topics F/S variable
Courses not required in any curriculum, for which there is a particular need, or given on a trial basis to determine demand.

PSYX292 Independent Study F/S variable
These courses are directed research or study on an individual basis. Requires the consent of the instructor.


Sign Language
SIGN120 Sign Language I S 3 credits – Core VI
Sign Language I is designed for beginning signers who want to increase communication skills, interact with deaf and hard of hearing children and adults with an English mode, and demonstrate knowledge and skill in expressive and receptive signing. Signers learn the aspects of a sign and are exposed to American Sign Language idioms. Students in this class receive instruction on communicating with deaf/hard of hearing individuals using sign language, facial features, fingerspelling, gestures, and pantomime. Students acquire a vocabulary of over 1000 words utilizing a variety of resources. Signers learn to respect and appreciate people who are deaf or hard of hearing and assimilate the manual communication.

SIGN121 Simple Language F 1 credit
Simple Sign Language is designed for beginning signers interested in Deaf Culture and Sign Language. This short and intensive course is for those with limited signing experience. A vocabulary of just over 500 words is acquired by playing games, repetition, and practice in a ‘real world’ setting by providing communication opportunities with other signers or d/Deaf individuals.


Sociology
SOCI101 Introduction to Sociology F/S 3 credits – Core III
Sociology is the study of individuals and society and their impact upon each other. This course will provide an overview of the principles, concepts, and methods of sociology. Focuses will include socialization, social groups, stratification, social institutions, society and culture. A global perspective is included in conjunction with examining U.S. society, and current events will be incorporated into the course to allow students the ability to understand social phenomena as it applies to the real world.

SOCI194/294 Seminar/Workshop F/S variable
These are concentrated class sessions on a topic for which a particular need has been identified.

SOCI201 Social Problems S 3 credits – Core III
This is a survey and analysis of sociological perspectives in the study of social problems. Major U.S. and global problems are examined from the perspective of cultural values and social structure. Possible solutions to the problems will be explored.

SOCI206 Deviant Behavior S 3 credits
This is a sociological examination of the theoretical perspectives on deviance and crime. Topics may include organized crime, substance abuse, mental disorders and sexual deviance.

SOCI211 Introduction to Criminology F 3 credits
Criminology may be defined as the study of crime, its causes, and its controls. In addition to examining the various causes of crime, this course will overview various categories of crimes, criminals, and controls that have been established in an attempt to provide the student with an understanding of the impact, causes, and prevention of crime in our society.

SOCI215 Introduction to Sociology of the Family S 3 credits
This is an historical, cross-cultural and analytical examination of the family as a social institution. Focuses include ideology, social change, social structures, and role expectations for family members.

SOCI236 Introduction to Race and Ethnic Relations S 3 credits – Core VI
This course focuses on the socio-historical and structural analysis of race and ethnic relations among groups in the U.S. and other global settings. Emphasis is placed on theories of oppression and other arrangements for integrating economic, political, and cultural factors involved in the emergence and perpetuation of inequality among peoples who are located in multicultural environments.

SOCI241 Introduction to Social Psychology F 3 credits
This course explores social behavior of the individual in the group, linguistic behavior, social perception, motivation and learning. Emphasis is given to the symbolic interactionist perspective and the relationship between culture and cognitive processes. Topics include how thoughts, feelings, and behavior of individuals are influenced by the actual, implied, or imagined presence of others.

SOCI246 Introduction to Rural Sociology F 3 credits
This course deals with human interaction, social relationships, and social organization in rural life. Rural communities, rural problems, and the relationships between rural and urban areas in such fields as political control will be explored. Special emphasis will be placed on Montana and the Great Plains.

SOCI260 Introduction to Juvenile Delinquency F 3 credits
This course will examine the legal and social meanings of the concept of juvenile delinquency. Areas of emphasis will include the characteristics of delinquent behavior and delinquents, theories of delinquent behavior and their policy implications, causation and control of delinquency, the impact of the police, family, community, peers, drugs, and school on delinquency, and the juvenile justice system as an institution.

SOCI291 Special Topics F/S variable
Courses not required in any curriculum, for which there is a particular need, or given on a trial basis to determine demand.

SOCI292 Independent Study F/S variable
These courses are directed research or study on an individual basis. Requires the consent of the instructor.


Spanish
SPNS100 Conversational Spanish F 2 credits
This is an audio-lingual course in everyday conversational Spanish for beginners. Emphasis is on ear training and oral practices. It introduces useful vocabulary related to daily activities, travel and economics. It establishes proficiency in simple spoken and written Spanish. This course is not designed to meet foreign language requirements at transfer institutions.

SPNS101 Elementary Spanish I F 4 credits – Core VI

Elementary Spanish I is a beginning Spanish course designed for students to learn the fundamentals of Spanish and achieve meaningful communication through a communication-based approach which addresses the four language skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. These four skills are integrated into the instruction. Students will need to be listening, reading and speaking in every class, as well as doing written assignments.

SPNS102 Elementary Spanish II S 4 credits – Core VI
Prerequisite: SPNS101, demonstrated proficiency, or consent of instructor. Elementary Spanish II is a continuation of Elementary Spanish I. Students will continue to learn the fundamentals of Spanish and develop meaningful communication through a communication-based approach which addresses the four language skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Students will increase their knowledge of vocabulary, verbs, structure, and general Spanish communication. Students will need to be listening, reading and speaking in every class, as well as doing written assignments.

SPNS201 Intermediate Spanish I F 3 credits
Prerequisite: SPNS102, demonstrated proficiency, or consent of instructor. The second-year sequence builds on the basic language skills and grammar learned in SPNS101 and SPNS102 but with more emphasis on conversational skills. Grammar will be introduced and reviewed through discussions, readings, and short compositions conducted in Spanish.

SPNS202 Intermediate Spanish II S 3 credits
Prerequisite: SPNS201, demonstrated proficiency, or consent of instructor. The second-year sequence builds on the basic language skills and grammar learned in SPNS101 and SPNS102 but with more emphasis on conversational skills. Grammar will be introduced and reviewed through discussions, readings, and short compositions conducted in Spanish.

SPNS194/294 Workshop F/S variable
These are concentrated class sessions on a topic for which a particular need has been identified.

SPNS291 Special Topics F/S variable
Courses not required in any curriculum, for which there is a particular need, or given on a trial basis to determine demand.

SPNS292 Independent Study F/S variable
These courses are directed research or study on an individual basis. Requires the consent of the instructor.


Statistics
STAT216 Introduction to Statistics S 4 credits – Core V
Prerequisite: M95 or equivalent, Math Placement Test, or consent of instructor. This course introduces the concepts and procedures used in statistical reasoning and analysis. Topics in descriptive statistics include the presentation of data, the measures of location, central tendency and variability and relationships between variables. Topics in inferential statistics include probability, sampling distributions and the use of confidence intervals and hypothesis testing.


Surveying
SRVY130 Basic GPS I F/S 1 credit
Students will learn how Global Positioning Systems work, applications for GPS in science, industry, recreation, and agriculture. Students will learn how to use a GPS to mark way-points, navigate, and locate.

SRVY131 Basic GPS II S 1 credit
Prerequisite: SRVY130 or consent of instructor. Students will learn how to interface a hand-held GPS receiver with a computer by downloading GPS information to commercially available software, and how to use computer maps to identify locations and then use a GPS to field locate those places.

SRVY230 Intro to Surveying for Engineers F 3 credits
Covers the basics of plane surveying. Linear measurement, errors, leveling, the use of transit, theodolite and total stations to make traverses, traverse adjustments, earthworks, and map construction. An introduction to GPS surveying.

SRVY262 Public Land Survey Systems S 3 credits
Prerequisite: SRVY230. This class introduces students to the history, and principles of public land survey system, legal descriptions, easements, and conveyances. Students will learn the fundamentals of legal boundary location and the identification of property corners and their monumentation. Students will be working both in the classroom and numerous locations around the county.


Theater Arts
THTR101 Introduction to Theater F/Alt Yr 3 credits – Core II, Category II or Core VI
This class is a survey of the world of theater. Students will be introduced to the art of theater by examining the actor, the playwright, the designer, the director, the dramatic structure, and the history of theater.

THTR106 Theater Production I: Run Crew F/S 1 credit
This course is for those who involve themselves in the costuming, make-up, properties, advertising, and box office work of an actual stage production of a full-length play. Credits given are based upon the individual student’s involvement in the processes. It may be repeated for a maximum of four credits.

THTR108 Theater Experience F/S 1 credit – Core II, Category I
This course is designed to provide students with a combination of acting, stagecraft, and dramatic lab experiences while involved in a theater production. Three credits of this course may be applied to the Core III performing arts requirement.

THTR124 Acting Laboratory F/S 1 credit
This course is for those who, through the use of scripted material, wish to explore the basic concepts of the art of acting by their participation in an actual stage performance. It may be repeated for a maximum of four credits.

THTR194/294 Seminar/Workshop F/S 1credit
This course focuses on technical work, including set design, lighting, and production. Students are expected to work “backstage” for a bona fide, full-length stage play or musical. Credits given are based upon the individual student’s involvement in the processes. It may be repeated for a maximum of four credits.

THTR291 Special Topics F/S variable
Courses not required in any curriculum, for which there is a particular need, or given on a trial basis to determine demand.

THTR292 Independent Study F/S variable
These courses are directed research or study on an individual basis. Requires instructor consent.


Welding Technology
WLDG105 Shop Safety (lecture based course) F 1 credit
Students will be introduced to a basic understanding of Personal Protective Equipment (PPE), Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS), and inspection of automated shop equipment. This course is designed to teach students safe shop practices prior to using any tooling in the welding lab. Successful completion of this course is a required prerequisite for all offered welding courses that are lab based. Additional fee required.

WLDG106 Metal Fabrication Methods S 4 credits
This course will focus on welding in the horizontal, vertical, and overhead positions. Students will practice making heads and joints with shielded Metal Arc Welding using various rods. Positioning and safety considerations will be highlighted. Welds will be tested for strength and defects. Additional fee required.

WLDG110 Welding Theory I (lecture based course) F 1 credit
This course is intended to teach the theory that accompanies the practical application of welding. Students will gain an understanding of the “why” that will impact their ability of the “how”. All welding and cutting processes are explained through lecture and instructor led demonstrations.

WLDG112 Cutting Processes (lecture (1)/lab (1) based course) F 2 credits
All fabrication begins with raw materials, which are shaped and fitted using a variety of cutting processes. This course is designed to demonstrate and familiarize the student with multiple torch cutting equipment and form an understanding of how to use each in a way to minimize waste and clean-up time. Additional fee required.

WLDG117 Blueprint Reading and Welding Symbols (lecture based course) S 2 credits
This course focuses on the graphic representations of fabricated products, as shown by engineer designed drawings. Students will be exposed to multiple views, material specifications, and weld symbols.

WLDG133 Gas Metal Arc Welding (lecture (1)/lab (2) based course) S 3 credits
Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW) is the most common welding process used in fabrication shops. This course is designed to introduce students to the proper start-up and usage of various brands of GMAW welding equipment that are used throughout the fabrication industry. Flat, vertical, and overhead welding will be taught and student welds will be subjected to bend testing for familiarization purposes. Additional fee required.

WLDG140 Intro to GTAW – Integrated Lab (lecture (1)/lab (2) based course) S 3 Credits
Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) is a specialized sector of welding used in automotive and alloy fabrication. Students will be instructed in a variety of ferrous and non-ferrous metal welding using the GTAW process, including spool-gun techniques using industry-standard equipment. Flat, vertical, and overhead positions will be taught. Student welds will be subjected to tensile testing for familiarization purposes. Additional fee required.

WLDG150 Layout Practices (lecture (1)/lab (1) based course) F 2 credits
Provides layout and fitting skills applicable to an industrial welding and fabrication shop. Tasks include reading prints, estimating, and ordering materials. Employs simple layout, parallel line development, radial line development, triangulation for pattern development and applied math concepts. Additional fee required.

WLDG180 Shielded Metal Arc Welding(lecture (1)/lab (3) based course) F 4 credits
Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW) is the most common welding process used for pipe welding and outdoor fabrications. Students will gain an understanding of electrode selection, machine set-up and amperage selection. Flat, vertical, and overhead positions will be practices. Student welds will be subjected to bend testing and familiarization. Additional fee required.

WLDG186 Welding Quality Test Preparation (lecture (1)/lab (1) based course) F 2 credits
This course allows students to practice all welding processes in all positions with the intention of successful completion of American Welding Society certification testing. Practice welds will be subjected to the same testing and inspection procedures as the final examination. This is designed to allow the student to lead their practice focus and tailor it to the specific certifications they are seeking. Additional fee required.

WLDG187 Flux Core Arc Welding (lecture (1)/lab (1) based course) F 2 credits
Flux Core Arc Welding (FCAW) is a wire-feed welding process that does not require a shielding gas. It has fabrication and repair applications for outdoor uses when SMAW is not practical. Students will become familiar with machine set-up procedures, process applications, and dual-shield techniques. Flat, vertical, and overhead positions will be taught and practiced. Completed welds will be bend-tested for familiarization purposes. Additional fee required.

WLDG201 Welding, Measurement, and Trade Tools (lecture based course) F 2 credits
This course will give the student an understanding of the tools they will use and encounter during their career as a welder. The course will highlight and discuss the many hand and power tools the student will need to have experience with in order to perform their job in the highest standard of quality. 

WLDG205 Applied Metallurgy (lecture based course) F 2 credits
Students will learn about metal properties, the effects of heat and cold, and tempering of metals and alloys. Wood and gas forging techniques will be practiced along with mold making poured castings. Weldability of metals and filler metals will be taught, including physical and mechanical properties of each. Additional fee required.

WLDG210 Pipe Welding (lecture (2)/lab (2) based course) F 4 credits
Provides an introduction to pipe layout, fitting, and welding. Instructs students in piping information, basic pipe layout practices, use of pipe layout tools, and basic pipe welding techniques. Safety, quality, and proper welding techniques standards are stressed.

WLDG212 Pipe Welding – Layout (lecture (1)/lab (3) based course) S 4 credits
This course provides the student with a thorough technical understanding of preparation and fit-up for welding pipe. Students acquire the necessary skills to perform satisfactory welds on different materials of pipe, in all positions and situations, using SMAW welding process. The student develops the skills necessary to produce quality pipe fitting and welds needed in today’s workforce. Additional fee required.

WLDG235 Oxy-Acetylene Welding (lab based course) F 2 credits
Oxygen-acetylene welding (OAW) is a process that has applications in thin material fabrication and repair. Specialty OAW is also used in alloy welding. Students will become familiar with a variety of OAW applications on ferrous and non-ferrous materials. Flat and vertical positions will be practiced. Welds will be subjected to tensile testing for familiarization.

WLDG237 Aluminum Welding Processes (lecture (1)/lab (3) based course) F 4 credits
Students will experience a hands on approach to the various applications of joining aluminum using arc welding. Students will train using GMAW-P, GMAW, GTAW, and GTAW-P welding. This course will cover the joining of aluminum exclusively. 

WLDG241 Metal Fabrication I (lecture (2)/lab (2) based course) F 4 credits
Students will study the basic skills needed to fabricate various projects. Focus of this course is how to ensure plumb, level, and square are achieved as well as prevention practices for metal warp and part movement during welding. Multiple cutting, grinding, drilling, and welding processes will be practiced. Additional fee required.

WLDG242 Metal Fabrication II (lecture (1)/lab (3) based course) S 4 credits
Further expansion of the skills learned in WLDG241 including structural and vehicle fabrication will be taught. In-depth projects will include the ability to accurately use flame and plasma torches, making assembly jigs, and fabrication of moving parts.

WLDG191/291 Special Topics F/S variable
Courses not required in any curriculum, for which there is a particular need, or given on a trial basis to determine demand.

WLD192/292 Independent Study F/S variable
These courses are directed research or study on an individual basis. Requires the consent of the instructor. Additional fee required.

WLDG194/294 Workshop F/S variable
Concentrated class sessions on a topic for which a particular need has been identified. Additional fee required.

WLDG298 Coop Education/Internship F/S variable
Provides credit for a sophomore work experience in the area of Welding and Metal Fabrication Technology. Supervised by faculty.


Writing
WRIT095 Developmental Writing F/S 2 credits
This is a non-transferable, non-core course designed to prepare students for college-level writing courses. This course emphasizes paragraph development and organization, sentence structure, word choice, transitions, punctuation, grammar, word economy, and level of usage. Students scoring 61 or below on the COMPASS Placement Exam or 42 or below on the ASSET Placement Exam are required to take this course as a prerequisite to WRIT101.

WRIT101 College Writing I F/S 3 credits – Core I (required)
Prerequisite: Successful completion of WRIT095, a score of 62 or above on the COMPASS Placement Exam, or consent of instructor. College Writing I is a course in college-level writing. Students will learn basic research skills, including information retrieval and documentation. Short essays will demonstrate critical thinking as a basis for clear, concise writing. A final research project will provide students with a model that may be used in academic and vocational settings.

WRIT121 Intro to Technical Writing S 3 credits
Prerequisite: WRIT101. This course covers the principles of creating and developing professional documents such as descriptions, instructions, reports, and proposals. Correct sentence structure, grammar, and usage are reviewed.

WRIT122 Introduction to Business Writing F 3 credits
Prerequisite: WRIT095 or WRIT101. Course content includes composing effective communications through letters and memos in a clear, complete, concise manner. Report writing and speaking to groups is also covered. Special emphasis is placed on job hunting and resume writing.

WRIT194/294 F/S Workshop F/S variable
Concentrated class sessions on a topic for which a particular need has been identified.

WRIT201 College Writing II F/S 3 credits – Core I
Prerequisite: Grade “C-” or better in WRIT101 or consent of instructor. A continuation of the study of the modes of composition introduced in WRIT101, this course emphasizes research-based argumentation and research writing involving research methods, the avoidance of plagiarism, and formal documentation in the APA format. This course also emphasizes further development of structure, clarity, style, diction, and the maturation of ideas. Students will be expected to write without major faults in grammar or usage and will write up to four argumentative essays and a significant research paper, accompanied by a thorough bibliography.

WRIT202 College Writing III F/S 3 credits – Core I
Prerequisite: WRIT101. This course is designed for students who wish to attain a higher level in their expository writing skills. Various rhetorical devices are explored in class readings. Emphasis is on thinking and writing skills and the translation of such skills into clear, well-organized prose.


Personnel

Administration

(Year in parenthesis indicates first year of service at Dawson Community College)

President
Mickelsen, Scott (2016)
Ph.D., Iowa State University
M.S., Utah State University
B.S., Utah State University
A.A.S., Ricks College (BYU-I)
A.S., Ricks College (BYU-I)
Office: 123
Phone: 377.9406
e-mail: [email protected]

Vice-President of Academic Affairs
Vacant

Vice-President of Student Affairs
Bole, John (2014)
M.Ed., Wright State University
B.A., Cedarville University
Office: 131A
Phone: 377.9416
email: [email protected]

Vice-President of Administration
Zander, Zander (2013)
B.S., Dickinson State University
Office: 120
Phone: 377.9403
e-mail: [email protected]

Full-time Faculty

Dershem-Bruce, Holly (1991)
Law Enforcement, Political Science, Sociology, Criminal Justice, Private Security
M.A., Washington State University
B.S., Lewis-Clark State College
Office: L117
Phone: 377.9432
e-mail: [email protected]

Di Gangi, Christina (2015)
English, Writing, Literature
Ph.D., University of Notre Dame
B.A., University of Ottawa
Office: L118
Phone: 377.9415
e-mail: [email protected]

Drivdahl, Joseph (2000)
English, Computer Applications
M.B.A., Capella University
B.S., University of Montana-Western
Office: L115
Phone: 377.9444
e-mail: [email protected]

Hunter, Michael (1992)
Mathematics
M.S., Montana State University
B.S., Montana State University
Office: 133A
Phone: 377.9433
e-mail: [email protected]

Ingram, Christopher (2014)
Welding
Certified
Office: UC015
Phone: 377.9478
e-mail: [email protected]

Lewis, Chris (2016)
Leadership; Head Coach Men’s Baseball
M.A., Campbellsville University
B.S., Eastern Oregon University
Office: TC111
Phone: 377.9492
e-mail: [email protected]

Reeves, Thomas (1992)
Chemistry, Science
M.S., North Dakota State University
B.S., Dickinson State University
Office: 113/142
Phone: 377.9438
e-mail: [email protected]du

Shipstead, Jerusha (2016)
Library Director
M.L.S., Emporia State University
B.A., Montana State University-Billings
Office: L121
Phone: 377.9414
e-mail: [email protected]

Stockert, Brenda (1992)
Early Childhood Education
M.Ed., Montana State University-Billings
B.S., Dickinson State University
Office: UC125
Phone: 377.9463
e-mail: [email protected]

Temple, Jennifer (2012)
Biology
M.S., Montana State University-Bozeman
B.S., Dickinson State University
Office: 113
Phone: 377.9431
e-mail: [email protected]

Wheeler, Jennifer (2016)
Art
M.FA., Western Connecticut State University
B.FA.,, Western Connecticut State University
Office: UC127
Phone: 377.9474
e-mail: [email protected]

Half-time Faculty

Diegel, Kortney (2010)
Head Rodeo Coach (2012)
B.S., University of Montana – Western
A.A., Dawson Community College
Office: TC112
Phone: 377.9417
e-mail: [email protected]

Lagmay, Romeo (2014)
Head Coach Women’s Basketball
M.A., Slippery Rock University
B.A., California State University-Dominquez Hills
A.A., Feather River Community College
Office: TC106
Phone: 377.9450
e-mail: [email protected]

LeProwse, Jim (2010)
Head Coach Women’s Softball
B.S., University of Montana, Western
Office: TC107
Phone: 377.9466
e-mail: [email protected]

Peterson, Joe (2015)
Head Coach Men’s Basketball
M.Ed., Northwest State University
B.S., Rocky Mountain College
A.S., Dawson Community College
Office: TC113
Phone: 377.9459
email: [email protected]

Classified Staff

Boysun, Virginia (2010)
Registrar
B.S., Montana State University, Billings
Office: 101A
Phone: 377.9404
e-mail: [email protected]

Cela, Suela (2013)
Enrollment Management Coordinator
B.S., B.A., University of Nebraska
Office: 119
Phone: 377.9419
e-mail: [email protected]

Diegel, Kortney (2010)
Student Advocate
B.S., University of Montana – Western
A.A., Dawson Community College
Office: 127
Phone: 377.9465
e-mail: [email protected]

Dinges, Danielle (2016)
Financial Aid Director
B.S., Northern Arizona University
Office: 104
Phone: 377.9410
email: [email protected]

Dutton, Marilyn (1988)
Instructional Services Administrative Assistant
A.A., Compton Junior College
Office: L105
Phone: 377.9405
e-mail: [email protected]

Egan, Tiffaney (2016)
Enrollment Management Online Specialist
Office: 101
Phone: 377.9411
email: [email protected]

Johnson, Tami (2015)
Student Advocate
Assistant Softball Coach, Head J.V. Softball Coach
B.S., Talladega College
Office: 127
Phone: 377.9465
e-mail: [email protected]

Keaster, Doyle (2016)
I.T. Specialist
Office: 148
Phone: 377.9421
email: [email protected]

Kuehn, Glenn (2014)
Maintenance Technician
Office: 130
Phone: 377.9451
e-mail: [email protected]

Lagmay, Romeo (2014)
Sports Information Director
M.A., Slippery Rock University
B.A., California State University-Dominquez Hills
A.A., Feather River Community College
Office: TC106
Phone: 377.9450
e-mail: [email protected]

Legato, Troy (1999)
Maintenance Technician
A.A., Dawson Community College
Office: 130
Phone: 377.9451
e-mail: [email protected]

LeProwse, Jim (2010)
Physical Plant Director
B.S., University of Montana, Western
Office: 024
Phone: 377.9451
e-mail: [email protected]

Lewis, Stephanie (2016)
Residential Ed and Housing Director
B.A., Campbellsville University
Office: N/A
Phone: 377.7806
email: [email protected]

Malkuch, Casey (2007)
Head Maintenance Engineer
Office: 130
Phone: 377.9451
e-mail: [email protected]

Masau, Traci (2015)
Workforce Education Coordinator
M.S., University Northern Florida
B.S., University of South Dakota
Office: L110
Phone: 377.9418
e-mail: [email protected]

Nolker, Daniel (2016)
Foundation Director, PR/Marketing
B.A., University of North Carolina at Greensboro
Office: 113
Phone: 377.9425
e-mail: [email protected]

Peterson, Bruce (2014)
Math Tutor and Skillshop Facilitator, Student Support Services
B.S.Ed, University of Montana
Office: L109
Phone: 377.9424
email: [email protected]

Peterson, Joe (2015)
Athletic Director
M.Ed., Northwest State University
B.S., Rocky Mountain College
A.S., Dawson Community College
Office: TC113
Phone: 377.9459
email: [email protected]

Powell, Kristi (1992)
Campus Store Manager
A.S., Western Montana College
A.A.S., Dawson Community College
Office: TC110
Phone: 377.9457
e-mail: [email protected]

Reed, Tammy (2008)
Administrative Services Assistant/Accounts Payable Technician
Office: 106
Phone: 377.9402
e-mail: [email protected]

Rojas, Frank (2016)
I.T. Director
M.A., Hunter College
Office: 149
Phone: 377.9422
e-mail: [email protected]

Sina, Rezart (2016)
Controller
B.S., University of Mary
A.S., Miles Community College
Office: 105C
Phone: 377.9458
e-mail: [email protected]

Vashus, Todd (2006)
Head Maintenance Technician
Office: 130
Phone: 377.9451
e-mail: [email protected]

Weldon, Leslie (2016)
Interim Director Human Resources
M.A., Gonzaga University
B.A., University of Montana
Office: 112
Phone: 377.9412
e-mail: [email protected]

Wynne, Jane (2006)
ABE Director
B.S.VICOED,/Teaching Certification, Western Washington University
Office: L115
Phone: 377.9420
e-mail: [email protected]